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Publication numberUS2716259 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 30, 1955
Filing dateDec 19, 1951
Priority dateDec 19, 1951
Publication numberUS 2716259 A, US 2716259A, US-A-2716259, US2716259 A, US2716259A
InventorsMott Carl W
Original AssigneeKendall & Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of making fabric sacks, especially for surgical sponges or the like
US 2716259 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

C. W. MOTT OD OF MAKING FABRIC SACKS, ESPECIALLY FOR SURGICAL SPONGES OR THE LIKE Aug. 30, 1955 BJEETH Original Filed July 31, 1948 M/qfi O 1/\).\JQ 5 k" Z 5 m u I w M- 2/ n B m um 60 I m B! W! m w E 2 E 1 I w 5' I ma A N mu 7, V HWWWU m UN 1 il I v S w. w & m Q Q 5 v. w w 7 United States Patent IVZETHDD 0F lWAKING FABRIC SACKS, ESPECIAL- LY FOR SURGICAL SPQNGES OR THE LIKE Carl W. Melt, Lake Gzark, Mm, assignor, by mesne assignments, to The Kendall Company, Boston, Mass and Chicago, 111., a corporation of Massachusetts {Iontinuation of abandoned application Serial No. 41,798, July 31, 1948, which is a division of application Serial No. 721,410, January 10, 1947. This application December 19, 1951, Serial No. 262,352

16 Claims. 01. 19 144.s

This invention relates to the method of making sacks or tubular fabric articles for absorbent elements known in the art as surgical sponges or tampons and used for the purpose of controlling hemorrhage or absorbing other fluids encountered by surgeons in the performance of surgical operations. The invention pertains particularly to the method of making such sponges or tampons, and this application is a continuation of my copending application Serial No. 41,798, filed July 31, 1948, now abandoned, which in turn is a division of my copending application, Serial No. 721,410, filed January 10, 1947, now abandoned, which covers the sponge itself. A continuation of Serial No. 721,410 is filed herewith.

Surgical sponges of the type heretofore known were characterized by a construction that provides a sack or jacket of gauze or the like filled with a wad of surgical cotton or similar material which may be absorbent or nonabsorbent as desired. In one known instance such sponges were manufactured by a method which included the forming of jackets, the filling of the jackets and the sewing together of the open end of each jacket. Although a sponge made in this manner was generally satisfactory in that it could be produced inexpensively in quantity and was adaptable for most purposes, it is found highly objectionable for use in abdominal operations, because such sponge in its completed form included a seam having projecting ends.

According to the present invention it is proposed to provide a surgical sponge or the like made by a method in which the finished product is preferably substantially spherical in shape, has no projecting or ragged end portions and which is surgically acceptable in all instances in which surgical sponges are used. The method provided according to the present invention is further characterized by simplicity of construction and economy in manufacture.

It is an important object of the invention to provide a method of forming a sack or equivalent tubular conduit of fabric or other suitable material and to close at least one end thereof by turning portions inwardly and securing the same in place by an annular constricting band preferably elastic and wholly concealed by the turned-in portions.

Further objects and features of the invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art as the disclosure is more fully made. In the following description reference will be made to construction of a surgical sponge or tampon, and the method of making the same will be similarly described. It should be understood, of course, that the expressions are used merely for the purpose of description and the disclosure should be taken as illustrative and not limiting, since the principles of the invention have wide application.

In the drawing, Figs. 1 to 4 illustrate successive steps in the making of the sponge; Fig. 5 is an enlarged view of the completed sponge; Fig. 6 is a transverse sectional view through a sponge comprising a jacket Patented Aug. 30, 1955 or sack filled with surgical cotton; and Fig. 7 is a transverse sectional view through a similar sponge in which the filling material comprises portions of the sack itself.

In Figs. 1 to 4 the reference character 10 designates a guide plate provided with an opening 11 therein. A piece of surgical gauze or like material, designated diagrammatically at 12, is fed into position so that it lies along the guide plate 10. The gauze is preferably square; although, it may be circular or rectangular or any other suitable shape. A tube 13 is placed in the position shown in Fig. 1, with its axis on the axis of the opening 11 in the plate 10. The tube 13 and the other tubular members to be presently described are preferably cylindrical in cross section but may be supplanted with elements of other shapes and sizes. A second tube 14 is mounted on the tube 13 and is axially slidable thereon. For the purposes of the present disclosure the tube 13 will be described as being held stationary while the tube 14 is movable thereon. It will be understood, of course, that the tube 14 may be held and the tube 13 moved. Similar reversals of motion will be obvious in connection with other steps in the method to be set forth.

The tube 14 is provided at its front end with a counterbore 15, the purpose of which will presently appear.

A third tube 16 is mounted in axial alinement with and at the opposite side of the plate 10 from the tubes 13 and 14. The tube 16 is capable of movement toward the tube 13 and its inside diameter is of such size that it has a loose telescopic fit over the tube 13. The tube 16 carries a collar 17 and the relationship between the tube 16 and collar 17 is such that the latter is axially slidable on the former.

In a preferred form of the method for making the sponges or tampons there may be provided a filling element or rammer 18 (Figs. 3 and 4).

In the initial position of the elements as shown in Fig. 1 the gauze 12 is placed as aforesaid. An annular element such as an elastic band 19 having an inner and outer periphery is stretched over the tube 16 and is placed somewhere near the'end thereof. The gauze 12 and the tube 13 are moved relative to each other so that the gauze is placed over the end of the tube 13. This movement may be accomplished by moving the guide plate 10 toward the tube 13 or by moving the tube 13 toward the plate 10. In the drawing the plate 10 is assumed to be mounted for movement toward and away from the tube 13 and in Figs. 2, 3 and 4 will be assumed to have been moved toward and away from the tube so that the gauze is placed in position over the end of the tube 13 to form a sack or tubular structure.

Since the area of the gauze 12 is considerably greater than the area of the circle comprising the outside diameter of the tube 13, substantially large portions of the gauze will be caused to lie along the outside of the tube 13 as sidewall elements shown at 20 in Fig. 2.

After the gauze has been positioned on the tube 13 as just described, the tube 16 and collar 17, together with the elastic band 19, are moved through the open ing 11 in the plate 10 and over the gauze-encased end of the tube 13 until the end of the tube 16 is spaced an appreciable distance from the end of the tube 13. The collar 17 is then moved toward the end of the tube 16 so that the elastic band 19 is dislodged therefrom.

The band 19 will, of course, snap into place aboutthe gauze on the tube 13 so that the inner periphery thereof will be in contactwith the gauze (Fig. 2). The tube 16 and collar 17 may now be returned to starting posi- .tion.

The tube 14 is now moved toward the end of the tube 13,'the counterbore 15 accommodating the elastic band 19. The forward marginal edge of the counterbore 15 will engage the extending portions 20 of the gauze in such manner as to fold these portions back over the band 19 and toward the end of the tube 13. The tube 14 is moved on the tube 13 to the position shown in Fig. 3, wherein it will be seen that the elastic band is enfolded by and secures the gauze 12 temporarily to the end of the tube 13. When the gauze and band have been moved to this position, the heretofore relatively small portion of the gauze that was stretched across the open end of the tube is augmented by portions of the gauze that were initially disposed between the end of the tube and the band 19, so that the gauze will now billow out to form a sack or bag and the band-enfolding portions of the gauze lie inside or are encircled by the band. In a preferred form of the invention vacuum is applied to the right-hand end of the tube 13 so that the sack formed in the gauze is immediately drawn into the tube 13, as shown in Fig. 3. Similarly the free end or edge portions 20 of the gauze will be drawn Within the sack, these portions having been moved toward the end of the tube 13 as aforesaid by the marginal edge of the counterbore 15.

Figs. 3 and 4 illustrate the method as including the step of filling the sack with a wad of surgical cotton or equivalent material. The wad is herein indicated by the numeral 21 and is fed into the sack by means of the rammer 18. It will be noted that the band 19 is enclosed by the inturned portions 20 and that the cotton 21 is inserted into the sack so that it engages these portions 20 and presses them outwardly against the outer Wall portions of the sack, thus confining the band 19 to the double wall structure provided at the mouth of the sack. As shown in Fig. 4, the wad 21 is maintained under compression by the rammer 18 so that it cannot escape from the sack. The tube 14 is moved still further beyond the end of the tube 13 to an extent sufficient to dislodge the gauze-encased band 19 from the end of the tube 13. As an alternative, the band may be caused to snap into place by moving the rammer 18 sufliciently far to the right to dislodge the band from the tube 13. In either case, the band snaps to the position shown in Fig. 4. Although the almost complete sack is now momentarily held on the rammer 18 by the band 19, the sack may be, stripped 01f the rammer by hand or by any suitable mechanism, after which the band will contract, closing the mouth of the sack and confining the cotton 21 there-within.

Fig. 5 illustrates the completed sponge or tampon. The band 19, being encased within the double wall StI'lJC1 ture at the mouth of the sack, completes the sponge in such manner that there are no edges projecting beyond the circumference or periphery of the generally spherical sponge. The band is of such size and construction that, although it is easily stretched for positioning on the tube 16, it is readily contractible to such an extent that it draws the mouth of the sack relatively tightly shut. The size of the opening remaining at the mouth of the! sack will, of course, vary according to the characteristics of the elastic band.

The sectional view of the sponge illustrated in Fig. 6 shows more clearly the relationship between the outer wall of-the sack, the now in-turned portions 20 and the encased cotton wad 21.

As a variation in the method and construction just described, the cotton wad 21 may be omitted. In this type of sponge, a sectional view of which is shown in Fig. 7, it is preferable that a larger piece of gauze'lz be used so that theprojecting or extending portions 20 70 'will be of increased length. Then, when these portions are folded and turned inside the sack in a manner corresponding to the illustration in Fig. 3, the portions themselves will serve to fill the sack and will accommodate the band .19 just as well in the double wall structure 5 a novel surgical sponge or tampon is provided and that method of accomplishing this construction is simple and inexpensive. Since these sponges are used in quantity, easy manufacture thereof is important. Since they are expendible, economical production thereof is desirable.

The sponge constructions and the methods disclosed herein are those that have been found preferable from the standpoint of accomplishing the features and objects of the invention. It will be understood, however, that various modifications and alterations maybe made in both the sponge construction and the method of making the same on the basis of the general principles set forth, all of which may be efiected without departing from the spirit and scope .of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.

What is claimed is: v

1. The method .of making an article of the class described, comprising the steps of: placing apiece of gauze or the like over the end of a tube to cover said end, with 25 relatively large portions of the gauze lying back a substantial-distance along the outside of the tube; temporarily securing said portions of the gauze to the tube by stretching an elastic band thereover at a position'spaced an appreciable distance from the end of the tube and leaving portions of the gauze extending generally axially of the tube and beyond the band; moving the gauze and band toward the end of the tube so that the gauze across the end of the tube is loose enough to form a sack; reversing the sack by moving same into the tube; folding the aforesaid axially extending portions over the band and within the sack to enclose the band; and moving-the enclosed band off the end of the tube to close the mouth of the sack.

2. The method of making an article of the class described, comprising the steps of: placing a piece of gauze or the like over the end of a tube to cover said end, with portions of the gauze lying back a substantial distance along the outside of the tube; temporarily securing said portions of the gauze to the tube by stretching an elastic band thereover at a position spaced an appreciable distance from the end of the tube and leaving portions of the gauze extending generally axially of TX the tube and beyond the band; moving the gauze and """band toward the end of the tube so that the gauze across the .end of the tube is loose enough to form a sack; reversing the sack by moving same into the tube; folding the aforesaid axially extendingportions over the band 4 and within the sack to enclose the band; filling the sack with absorbent material; and moving the enclosed band off the end of the tube to close the mouth of the sack.

3. The method of making an article of the class described, comprising the steps of: placing a piece of gauze or the like over the end of a tube to cover said end, with relatively large portions of the gauze lying back 0 a substantial distance along the outside of the tube;

tomporarily securing said portions of the gauze to the tube by stretching an elastic band thereover at a position spaced an appreciable distance from the end of the "tube and leaving portions of the gauze extending generally axially of the tube and beyond the band; moving the gauze and band towardthe end of the tube so that the gauze across the end of the tube is loose enough to form a sack; reversing the sack by moving same into the tube; folding the aforesaid axially extending portions back over the band to enclose the band; filling the sack with said folded-back portions; and moving the enclosed band off the end of the tube to close the mouth of the sack. 4. The method of making an article of the class described, comprising the steps of: placing a piece of gauze or the like across the end of a tube, the tube having a diameter substantially less than the edge-to-edge dimensions of the gauze, so that the end of the tube is covered by the gauze and so that portions of the gauze extend radially beyond the outside diameter of the tube; stretching an elastic band around a second tube that is capable of a loose telescopic fit over the first tube, telescoping the second tube over the first whereby to push the aforesaid extending portions of the gauze back along the outside of the first tube with the end of the tube remaining covered by the gauze, moving the elastic band off the second tube and thus around the extending portions of the gauze on the first tube at a position thereon an appreciable distance from the end of the first tube and leaving portions of the gauze extending generally axially of the tube beyond the band; withdrawing the second tube from the first tube; moving the band and gauze toward the end of the first tube, so that the gauze is loose enough to form a sack; moving the sack within the end of the first tube; folding the aforesaid axially extending portions of the gauze back toward the end of the tube and over the band to enclose the band; filling the sack with said folded-back portions; and moving the enclosed band ofi the end of the first tube to close the mouth of the sack.

5. The method of making an article of the class described, comprising the steps of: placing a piece of gauze or the like across the end of a tube, the tube having a diameter substantially less than the edge-to-edge dimensions of the gauze, so that the end of the tube is covered by the gauze and so that portions of the gauze extend radially beyond the outside diameter of the tube; stretching an elastic band around a second tube that is capable of a loose telescopic fit over the first tube, telescoping the second tube over the first whereby to push the aforesaid extending portions of the gauze back along the outside of the first tube with the end of the tube remaining covered by the gauze; moving the elastic band off the second tube and thus around the extending portions of the gauze on the first tube at a position thereon an appreciable distance from the end of the first tube and leaving portions of the gauze extending generally axially of the tube beyond the band; withdrawing the second tube from the first tube; moving the band and gauze toward the end of the first tube, so that the gauze is loose enough to form a sack; moving the sack within the end of the first tube; folding the aforesaid axially extending portions of the gauze back over the band and into the first tube to enclose the band; filling the sack with filling material; and moving the enclosed band off the end of the first tube to close the mouth of the sack.

6. The method of making an article of the class described, comprising the steps of: placing a piece of gauze or the like across the end of a tube, the tube having a diameter substantially less than the edge-to-edge dimensions of the gauze, so that the end of the tube is covered by the gauze and so that portions of the gauze extend radially beyond the outside diameter of the tube; stretching an elastic band around a second tube that is capable of a loose telescopic fit over the first tube; telescoping the second tube over the first whereby to push the aforesaid extending portions of the gauze back along the outside of the first tube with the end of the tube remaining covered by the gauze; moving the elastic band off the second tube and thus around the extending portions of the gauze on the first tube at a position thereon an appreciable distance from the end of the first tube and leaving portions of the gauze extending generally axially of the tube beyond the band; withdrawing the second tube from the first tube; moving the band and gauze toward the end of the first tube, so that the gauze is loose enough to form a sack; moving the sack within the end of the first tube; folding the aforesaid axially extending portions of the gauze back over the band and into the first tube to enclose the band; and moving the enclosed band off the end of the first tube to close the mouth of the sack.

7. The method of making an article of the class described, comprising the steps of: forming a piece of gauze or like material into a sack having relatively long sidewall elements; stretching an elastic band to a temporarily fixed dimension over the sidewall elements at a position thereon intermediate the closed end and the mouth of the bag so that substantial portions of said elements extend beyond the band; folding said extending portions back over the stretched band and along the sidewall elements to encase the band therein; retaining the band unexpanded beyond said fixed dimension; turning the sack, while the band remains unexpanded beyond said fixed dimension, inside out so that the aforesaid extending portions are inside the sack; filling the sack with filling material; and releasing the band to close the mouth of the sack.

8. The method of making an article of the class described, comprising the steps of: forming a piece of gauze or like material into a sack having relatively long sidewall elements; stretching an elastic band to a temporarily fixed dimension over the sidewall elements at a position thereon intermediate the closed end and the mouth of the bag so that substantial portions of said elements extend beyond the band; folding said extending portions back over the stretched band and along the sidewall elements to encase the band therein; retaining the band unexpanded beyond said fixed dimension; turning the sack, while the band remains unexpanded beyond said fixed dimension, inside out so that the aforesaid extending portions are inside the sack; filling the sack with filling material; temporarily pressing the filling material within the sack; and, while temporarily maintaining pressure on the absorbent material, releasing the band so that it will close the mouth of the sack and confine the filling material there-within.

9. The method of making an article of the class described, comprising the steps of: placing a piece of gauze or the like over the end of a tube to cover said end, with portions of the gauze lying back a substantial distance along the outside of the tube; temporarily securing said portions of the gauze to the tube by stretching an elastic band thereover at a position spaced an appreciable distance from the end of the tube and leaving portions of the gauze extending generally axially of the tube and beyond the band; moving the gauze and band toward the end of the tube so that the gauze across the end of the tube is loose enough to form a sack; reversing the sack by moving same into the tube; folding the aforesaid axially extending portions over the band and within the sack to enclose the band; filling the sack with filling material; applying a compressing element to the filling material through the open mouth of the sack to apply temporary pressure to said material; moving the enclosed band off the end of the tube so that it contracts about the compressing element; and stripping the sack, formed as above, from the compressing element, so that the band contracts still further and closes the mouth of the sack.

10. The method of making an article of the class described, comprising the steps of: placing a piece of gauze or the like over one end of a tube to cover said end, with relatively large portions of the gauze lying back a substantial distance along the outside of the tube; stretching an elastic band to surround the gauze portions and tube at a position spaced an appreciable distance from said end of the tube and leaving portions of the gauze extending generally toward the other end of the tube and beyond the band; moving the gauze and band toward said one end of the tube so that the gauze across said one end of the tube is loose enough to form a sack; reversing the sack by moving same into said end of the tube and folding the aforesaid axially extending portions over the band and within the sack to enclose the band; and moving the enclosed band off said one end of the ,tube to close the m h f the sac q 1 1. The method of making an article of the class described, comprising the steps of: forming a piece of gauze or like material into a sack having relatively long sidewall elements; encircling the sidewall elements by a band of temporarily fixed dimension at a position thereon intermediate the closed end and the mouth of the bag so that portions of said elements extend beyond the band; folding said extending portions back over the band and alon the sidewall elements to encase the band therein;

retaining ,the band unexpanded beyond said fixed dimension and turning the sack, while the band remains unexpanded beyond said fixed dimension, inside out so that the aforesaid extending portions are inside the sack and causing the band to close the mouth of the sack;

12. The method of making an article of the class .described, comprising the steps of: forming a piece of gauze or like material into a tubular structure having opposite ends, at least one of which is open; and constricting said open end by positioning and stretching an elastic band to a temporarily fixed expanded dimension disposed coaxially of and intermediate the ends of said structure, retaining the band unexpanded beyond said fixed dimension; and, while the'band remains unexpanded beyond said fixed dimension, enveloping the band by foldingportions of the sack back over the band and interiorly of the structure sothat said portions are surrounded by the band, and causing the 'band'to contract about said surrounded portions.

13. The method of making an article of the class described, comprising the steps of: forming a piece of gauze or like material into a sack body having relatively long sidewall elements and an open mouth; stretching an elastic band to a temporarily fixed expanded dimension disposed over the sidewall elements at a position thereon intermediate the closed end and the mouth of the body so that substantial portions of said elements extend mouthwardly beyond the band; folding said extending portions back'over the band and toward the closed end of the body to enfold the band therein; retaining the band unexpanded beyond said fixed dimension, reversing said extending portions, While the band remains unexpanded beyond saidfixed dimension, so as to lie inside the sack body and be encircled by the band; and causing the band to contract to close the sack.

' 14. The method of making an article of the class described, comprising the stepsof: accumulating a quantity of flexible material into the form of a sack-like structure having an .open mouth; arranging at said mouth a substantially annular, restricting element that has inner and outer peripheries of temporarily fixed dimension and that is capable of being substantially reduced in circumference; retaining the element unexpanded beyond said fixed dimension, folding mouth-proximate portions of the material, while the element remains unexpanded beyond said fixed dimension about the element so as to lie within the structure and the inner periphery of said element; and causing a reduction in the circumference of the element to gather said mouth-proximate portions into a closure for the sack and to confine said mouth-proximate portions so as to retain the sack-like form vof said structure.

15, The method of making a surgical sponge constituted of a fastened sack of gauze substantially filled with its own marginal portions comprising gathering marginal fastening element having an opening therethrough of temporarily fixed dimension less than that of said sheet material, and, while retaining said opening unexpanded beyond said fixed dimension, infolding said portions back through said opening and with the remaining portions of the gauze forming a sack containing said infolded portions and constricting the fastening element to closely gather said infolded portions inside of the sack adjacent the mouth thereof with free ends of the infolded portions extending inwardly of the sack beyond the constricted fastening element, to substantially fill the sack, said fastening element retaining the folds formed at the juncture between the infolded portions and the sack-forming portion.

16. The method of making a surgical sponge and the like comprising gathering marginal portions of sheet material around the outside of a fastening element having an opening therethrough of temporarily fixed dimension less than that of said sheet material, and, while retaining said opening unexpanded beyond said fixed dimension,

. infolding the said marginal portions back through the said opening with the remaining portions of said sheet material forming a sack containing the said infolded portions, and constricting the fastening element to reduce'said opening and closely gather the said infolded portions inside of the sack adjacent the mouth thereof with free ends of the said infolded portions extending inwardly of the sack beyond .the constricted fastening element, said fastening element retaining thefolds formed at the juncture between said infolded portions and the sack-forming portions.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,350,357 Kelman June 6, 1944' FOREIGN PATENTS 508,610 Great Britain July 4, 1939

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2350357 *Apr 3, 1941Jun 6, 1944Kelman David JScouring device and method for making the same
GB508610A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3580303 *Apr 16, 1969May 25, 1971Roberge Robert AInflatable toy dispenser
US3733677 *Sep 29, 1970May 22, 1973Johns ManvilleApparatus and method to produce cylindrical articles
US4651505 *Jun 17, 1985Mar 24, 1987George GropperApparatus and method of making cleaning pads
US20100306577 *May 28, 2009Dec 2, 2010Lsi CorporationSystems and Methods for Managing End of Life in a Solid State Drive
Classifications
U.S. Classification28/121, 15/209.1, 53/235, 493/386, 141/314, 141/114
International ClassificationA61F13/20
Cooperative ClassificationA61F13/2082
European ClassificationA61F13/20M