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Publication numberUS2716447 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 30, 1955
Filing dateSep 24, 1949
Priority dateSep 24, 1949
Publication numberUS 2716447 A, US 2716447A, US-A-2716447, US2716447 A, US2716447A
InventorsPaul L Adams, Wayne A Norman, Charles K Sitterly
Original AssigneeCarr Adams & Collier Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Casement unit
US 2716447 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 30, 1955 P. L. ADAMS ET AL 2,716,447

CASEMENT UNIT Filed Sept. 24, 194 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.

Paul L. d ams u gne a. horman Charles A. Sitterly Aug. 30, 1955 P. ADAMS ET AL 2,716,447

CASEMENT UNIT Filed Sept. 24, 1949 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 r INVENTORS Paul L. Gdams Wayne a, Norman Charles K. 81 tter'ly Aug. 30, 1955 P. ADAMS ET AL CASEMENT UNIT 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Sept. 24, 1949 INVENTOR. Paul L. adams Wayne array-man Charles K. Sit

terly United States Patent CASEMENT UNIT Paul L. Adams, Wayne A. Norman, and Charles K. Sitterly, Dubuque, Iowa, assignors to Carr, Adams & Collier Company, Dubuque, Iowa, a corporation of Iowa Application September 24, 1949, Serial No. 117,666

10 Claims. (Cl. 160-40) This invention relates to a casement unit designed for installation in building structures. It is concerned especially with a window casement which comprises two adjacent sashes mounted for independent swinging movement outwardly so that, by proper manipulation, opposite faces of the glass in each sash may be brought into accessible position from the inside of the window.

This invention also incorporates numerous details of improvement whereby the glass in each sash is supported in a gasket which may act also as a Weatherstrip; with a novel construction of frames for the casement unit and for the two sashes that are mounted therein for independent swinging movement; with the means by which the frame for the two sashes may be hung for swinging from the right or the left side, without requiring separate or different frames for this purpose; with a return which may be adjusted to walls of different thickness when extended outwardly from a point flush with the plaster face on the inside to an insulating strip which is secured adjacent the frame for the casement unit; with a lock by which the two sashes are secured along their free edges so as to be secured releasably together for swinging movement in unison or independently of each other; and with a lock whereby the two sashes as a unit may be secured immovably to their supporting frame, thereby preventing opening of the window from the outside.

These and various other features of construction as will hereinafter appear constitute our invention a suggestive embodiment whereof is illustrated in the accompanying drawings wherein:

Figure 1 is a vertical section through the casement unit and also the adjacent parts of an associated building structure, taken on line 11 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 2 is a detail in section, taken on line 22 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a horizontal section, taken on line 3-3 of Fig. l;

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary elevation of the outside of the casement window, the view being substantially confined to its bottom rail and the window portion adjacent thereto;

Fig. 5 is a horizontal section, taken on line 5-5 of Fig.

Fig. 6 is a semi-diagrammatic view in transverse section, showing the two sashes of the casement unit in closed position;

Fig. 7 which is a similar view, shows the two sashes, as a unit, swung outwardly to a partially open position;

Fig. 8, which is a view similar to Fig. 7, shows the main supporting frame swung outwardly and the two sashes swung inwardly to a position wherein the outside face of the outer sash is accessible to a person within the window;

Fig. 9, which is a view similar to Fig. 8, shows the supporting frame, together with its inner sash, swung outwardly of the casement frame to position the inner face of the outer sash and the outside face of the inner sash accessibly to a person within the window;

Patented Aug. 30, 1955 Fig. 10 is an outside elevational view of the window unit; 1

Fig. 11 is a fragmentary detail showing in horizontal section a window unit having a modified supporting means 5 for the inner and outersash frames, the plane of the section being approximately on line 11.11 of Fig. 10;

Fig. 12 is a fragmentary perspective view showing a sliding type of lock for the free swinging edges of the two sashes;

Fig. 13 is a detail in section, taken on line 13-13 of Fig. 12;

Fig. 14 is adetail in section,itaken on line 14-14 of Fig. 15, the latter being a fragmentary perspective view showing a rotary type of lock applied to the swinging 15 edges of the two sashes; v

Fig. 16 which is a detail in section, taken on line 16-16 of Fig. 17, shows the lock operated to secure the outer sash while freeing the inner sash;

Fig. 17 is a fragmentary perspective view thereof;

Fig. 18 which is a detail in section, taken on line 1818 of Fig. 19, shows the lock operated to secure both sashes to the frame wherein the casement unit is mounted; and

Fig. 19 is a fragmentary perspective view thereof.

The present casement unit is adapted for installation in a window opening of appropriate size in a wall structure certain details of which appear in Figs. 1 and 3.

These include the building frame which surrounds the window opening-the studs 20, head 21 and sill 22.

Sheathing 23 may also be aflixed to the outside of the wall structure in the usual way.

Into a window opening of this general description is fitted the frame F of our improved casement unit, made preferably of some such material as aluminum which may be die cast or extruded to the required form. As

shown, this frame is rectangular to provide along the sides (see Fig. 3) jambs 25 which are extended the full width of the sheathing and outwardly therefrom to a point just past the siding 26 to serve as a brick mold therefor; at its top and bottom the frame provides a lintel 27 and sill 28, respectively (see Fig. 1) and rising from the lintel is a flange forming a head 30, while depending'from the sill is another flange constituting a base 31., The entire frame on all four of its sides may be outset in a medial plane so that its portion to the outside defines an area {,5 slightly greater than the frame portion to the inside. At

the point of this outset a continuous shoulder 33 is provided. Along the inner margin of the frame an inturned flange 35 is formed. 7 i To the outside of each jamb outset is extended in- 3 wardly a rib 36 defining with the inset portion of the frame a cove for receiving and, holding a bead 38 which is offset along one edge of a flashing 39 which extends away from the frame to be fastened to the sheathing 23, preferably over building paper which is secured thereto. The frame is set into the window opening for'the correct distance when its head 30 and base 31 engage the sheathing. When so positioned certain tabs 40 which outstand from the frame jamb (see Fig. 10) are also engaged with the sheathing. As by nails or screws which are inserted through openingsin the head, base and tabs, to be anjchored into the sheathing, the frame F may be fixedly secured within the window opening. ,In case the building wall be constructed of brick or masonry, appropriate timbers embedded therein may receive the fastening elements used to secure the frame in place.

To the inside. of the frame F, when made and installed pursuantto the foregoing description, there is a considerable space owing to the wall thickness which is. usually substantial. Within this space is positioned a setof insulating strips 44, of wood or composition material, made into a frame of about the samesize asthe window frame F against which is fitted and towhich it is secured as by screws 45 which are entered through the flanges 35. Sheet returns 46 of aluminum or the like are extended inwardly from the strips 44 between return bends 48 and 49 to overlie boards 50, desirably of insulating composition material, whose opposite edges are disposed interiorly of, the bends 48 and 49 to provide reinforcement therefor. The outer edge portion of each return-board assembly may be accommodated alongside the window frame F in case the wall be of lesser thickness.(see Fig. 3, the dot and dash showing to the right) whereas in case of greater thickness there need be no such overlap. Should the wall be of still greater thickness, the return-board assembly may be positioned as shown by the dot and dash lines to the left in .Fig. 3. Screws 51 which are entered through the return-board assembly for anchorage in the strips 44 maintain these several parts pre-assembled in unitary relation. The inner return bend 48 is formed into a bead and then continues obliquely back toward the window frame stud 20 to present thereto a marginal flange 52 through which attaching screws 53 may be entered. The bead 48 may constitute a corner for a plaster coat 54 applied interiorly to the building wall to extend just to the edge of the finished window opening; transversely of that opening the sheet return does away with the need of any plaster, wood return, and trim at that point. This is a very advantageous feature of our invention, and it permits the sheet return to be continuous from one frame jamb 25, through the still 28 (and possibly across the head) to the other jamb.

Each of the strips 44 may be rabbeted to provide an inwardly facing seat for a screen panel which comprises a frame which may advantageously be produced from extruded aluminum to provide rectangular tubular bars 60 each having its outer wall projected outwardly at 61 (see Fig. 3) to provide a spacer. Inwardly of the four walls 61 is positioned a frame 63 of wire or the like which carries amesh fabric that is continuous thereacross. The wire frame is adapted to be centered and held between the four walls 61 as by means of a rectangular frame 62 of metal, plastic or the like when positioned upon the outer face of the tubular bar frame 60 in closely spaced relation to its walls 61. The gap at the opening between the frame 62 and the walls 61 is desirably constricted, as shown. The frame provides any Weatherstripping that is needed at this point. Any appropriate fastening means may be employed to secure the tubular bar frame to its mounting frame which is constituted by the strips 44.

The description up to this point has been concerned with the window frame F and various details of its construction and of its fixed installationwithin a typical window opening. We advance now to a consideration of the sash unit itself that is pivotally mounted in the frame, and of the various novel and improved features that are embodied in its construction.

The sash unit herein disclosed comprises a main frame S desirably produced from die cast aluminum, and made up of top and bottom rails 65 and 66 interconnected by stiles 67. Across, and to the outside of, the frame thus provided, we extend a system of bars 68 which simulate muntins (see Fig. 10). The bar system 68 is omitted from the remaining figures of the drawings in the interest of clarity. In cross section the rails and stiles are substantially alike, each comprising a front plate which is slightly offset inwardly at 70 where the bar system joins therewith and, at about the same point, an inwardly extending flange 71 (see Fig. 5). Extending outwardly from the top and bottom rails adjacent one of the stiles 67 are ears 72 which lie proximate to the lintel Z7 and sill 28 of the window frame F. Each ear is centrally apertured to receive a pivot pin 74 which is extended also into a coaxial bushing 75. The bushing at the top is fitted into the'aperture of the proximate ear (see Fig. l) and the pivot pin is extended upwardly through the frame linte127 with the head 76 of the pin rested upon its upper side; the pivot pin at the bottom is carried directly by the proximate sash frame car 72 and extended downwardly into the associated bushing which is fitted into a coaxial aperture in the frame sill 28. In practice two holes for the bushings are desirably formed in the lintel and sill of the frame, one near each end thereof, and then filled with dummy inserts 78 of stainless steel or the like (see Figs. 4 and 5). This is done during the process of manufacture at the factory. When shipped out to the job site, one set of inserts, either right or left, can then be knocked out to permit installation in the window frame F of the main sash frame S that is to be accommodated therein. The main sash frame is reversible in that it may be inverted to position its cars 72 at the rightor the left side of the window frame F. Only the dummy inserts which are to be replaced by pivot pins 74 need be removed; the others which remain will continue to serve as permanent closures for the holes that are not needed. Any conventional means for operating and for locking the main sash frame in closed position may be provided.

The main sash frame mounts inner and outer sashes equipped with panes of glass or the like. Each pane is supported in its own frame, the inner frame in its entirety being designated as I and the outer frame as O. Carried by the top flange of the main sash frame is a depending pivot pin 79 which enters a socket at the top of the inner sash frame I near the side thereof that is remote from the axis of pivotal movement of the main sash frame S (see Figs. 1 and 3); and a trunnion pin80, coaxial therewith, is depended from the bottom of the inner sash frame I to enter a hole that is formed in the bottom flange 71 of the main sash frame (see Figs. 1 and 3). By means such as this we provide a hinged mounting, top and bottom, whereby the inner sash frame I is free to swing inwardly within the main sash frame S to an open position. The outer sash frame. 0, when closed, is rested upon a plurality of lugs 82 upstanding from the bottom flange 71 to lie within slots 83 which are formed in the bottom rail 84 of the inner sash frame I (see Figs. 1 and 2).

Since the two sashes I and O are independently operable (except When connected to operate together, as. will be hereinafter explained), they may be swung into closed position Within the supporting main sash, frame (Fig. 6); the main sash frame, while retaining the two sash frames I and O in closed position, may be swung outwardly of the window frame P (Fig. 7); both sash frames I and 0, while the main sash frame is swung outwardly, may be swung inwardly together to some such position as is shown in Fig. 8; or just the outer sash frame 0, while the main sash frame is swung outwardly, may be swung inwardly to leave the inner sash frame I in its closed position within the main sash frame S (Fig. 9). These are just a few of the many possible positions to which the two sash frames I and O, and also, their supporting main sash frame S, may be adjusted in the use of the present casement unit. It will be manifest that to a person at the inside of the. casement unit there is full accessibility as regards both faces of the two panes carried by the sash frames and 0, provided that proper manipulations of q the main sash frame 5 and itssupported sashes be made.

The outer sash frame 0 may take the form of a surround produced from metal fashioned to the desired'channel form by the extrusion process or otherwise. Such a surround may extend around all four sides of the pane 0, or only along-two oppositesides thereof, or be applied thereto in the-form of corner angles. As best shownin Figs. 1, 3 and 5, each surround is adapted to partly enclose a gasket 85.which' is channeled to receive the edge portions of the supported sash pane o of glass or the like. The surround edges are, shown asinturned slightly to exert a line compression upon opposite, sides of the gasket whereby to assure a permanent retention of the panegasket-surround assembly inv unitary relation.

The inner sash frame. I also may consist of a. surround having any of the forms suggested above for the surround fea of the outer sash frame.v As shown, the inner frame surround is channeled to partly enclose a gasket 87 having a channel to receive the edge portions of the supported sash pane i of glass or the like. In addition, this gasket is formed with a hollow bead 88 extending inwardly of the sash frame in position to engage the inside flange of the window frame F. The air chamber provided within the gasket bead enhances its yieldability so as to establish an effective seal with the frame F when engaged therewith in consequence of closing of the main sash frame S. The surround of the inner sash frame I also isextended outwardly to provide a. slotted hollow spacer 89 with which the surround of the outer sash frame 0 may engage when both inner and outer sash frames are in closed position within the main sash frame S. In this construction both panes i and 0 are bedded in gaskets of rubber or suitable composition material having a high insulating value, and the surrounds for these panes are also insulated from metal-to-metal contact with the supporting main sash frame S, except where it is pivotally connected to the frame F, so that moisture condensation on the interior surfaces of the two sash panes is minimized.

Referring now to Fig. 5, we provide a lock L (hereinafter to be described in detail) which may be operated to secure the free swinging side of the inner sash frame I to the proximate side frame of the outer sash frame 0. The two sash frame sides thus held together are the ones proximate to the axis of pivotal movement of the main sash frame S. Between the opposite sides of the inner and outer sash frames we provide a hinge connection ,j:

which may take the form of clips C of spring metal, each bent to provide along one edge portion a channel 91 for gripping engagement with the surround of the outer sash frame 0, a pair of return leaves which are joined through a head 92, and a head 93 adapted to be locked 7 Figure 11 illustrates a modification in the mountings of the inner and outer sashes within the main sash. frame S. Here the outer sash-frame O is provided at top and bottom adjacent one side with inwardly extending ears 95, each of which is apertured to receive pivot pins 96 which may be anchored in the top and bottom flanges 71 of the main sash frame, the same as already described in connection with Fig. 1. These pivot pins also enter sockets in the top and bottom surrounds of the inner sash frame I to provide therefora pivotal mounting which is coaxial with that afforded tothe outer sash frame through the medium of the ears 95. To the left of Fig. 11 is shown in elevation a pair of clips 97 and 98 closely embracing the surrounds of the inner and outer sashes I and 0 respectively. These clips may be applied to the corners of the sash frames to join the surrounds at those points.

A simple form of releasable retainer R for the free edges of the inner andouter sash frames is indicated toward the right side of Fig. 11. As shown, this com.- prises a sheet metal spring clip 99 applied tightly to the outer sash frame, preferably in its medial region vertically thereof, and doubled back on-itself to provide a latching strap 100 which extends inwardly in overlapping relation to a striker clip 101-that is applied tightly to the inner sash frame. The free end of the latching strap is formed into a hook 102 for releasable engagement with the rounded inner end of the striker clip 101 upon the inner sash frame. ,When so engaged, the inner and'outer sash frames are retained together so-as to swing inwardly or outwardly in unison upon' their coaxial hinge mount- 6 ings. -By proper manipulation, the spring latch strap 10 may be disengaged from its associated striker clip 101 to free the two sashes for movement independently of each other.

A lock in the form of a heavy wire with one end 103 turned laterally to engage a slot 104 within. the flange 71 of the main sash frame S is rotatably carried in a bracket that is affixed to the striker clip 101. In the position shown in Fig. 11 this lock secures both sashes in closed position within the main sash frame S, but when rotated through or so to a position of disengagement the two sashes will be freed for independent movement. The description up to this point has been concerned with the frame F, with the main sash frame S mounted to swing outwardly therefrom, and with the two sashes I and O which are mounted within the main sash frame to swing therewith, or inwardly therefrom, either independently or in unison. We advance now to a consideration of the means by which the two sashes may be locked to each other and to the main sash frame, or just to each other, or not at all.

' In Figs. 12 and 13 we have shown a sliding type of lock L applied to the free edges of the inner and outer sash frames. Such a lock may comprise a plate 105 having an elongated vertical slot 106 to receive a pair of vertically spaced pins 107 and 108 which are anchored to the outer sash O. Adjacent the slot 106 at a point medially of the two panes 0 and i is a third pin 110 anchored to the inner sash I, this pin being disposed within a vertical slot 111 which is positioned in the lower region of the locking plate 105 to open out upon the bottom edge thereof. The slot 111 is crimped'at 112 to provide a rounded shoulder 113 which protrudes laterally the'reinto at a point medially of its length. In the vertical sliding movements of the plate which is guided by the pins 107 and 108 within the slot 106, the shoulder 113 engages the pin 110 with each ascending movement of the plate, but the clearance, while narrow, is nevertheless sufficient to permit the plate to continue its movement therebeyond.

The locking plate 105 is vertically oflset at a point opposite the inner sash I (see Fig. 13) where a fourth pin 115 is entered within a vertical slot 116 that is extended upwardly from the bottom edge of the plate. This latter pin is anchored fixedly in the inwardly extending flange 71 of the main sash frame S. In the down position of the plate shown in Fig. 12 the pin 115 is engaged with the slot 116. Since the pins 107 and 108 remain continuously engaged with the slot 106, there is thus provided a locking connection between the main sash frame S and the inner and outer sashes I and 0 when the plate 105 is in the down position.

.The plate carries a flange 120 extending outwardly to lie in the space between the flange 71 of the main sash frame S and the window frame F. At its top and bottom the flange is provided with laterally extended fingers 121 which enter into the same space. These fingers serve as convenient gripping means for the operator to apply pressure to the locking plate 105 to produce either an upward or downward movement thereof.

Opposite to and aligned with the slot 116 which opens upon the bottom edge of the plate is a slot 122 opening out upon the top edge of the plate and in line with a pin 123 which is anchored to the flange 71 of the main sash frame S. When the locking plate is advanced upwardly to the point of the pin 115 disengaging from the bottom slot 116, the inner and outer sashes will be unlocked from the main sash frame S. This position is reached when the shoulder 113 has just passed the pin 110 and remains engaged therewith to hold the locking plate at this point. This shoulder thus serves as a stop for supporting the locking plate in the intermediate position where it is disengaged from both the pins 115 and ,123. When so positioned the inner sash I will remain connected with the outer sash 0, but both sashes may be swung in unison out .of the main sash frame S and then, by a further upward adjustment of the locking plate 105, be freed from each other. In the uppermost position where the locking plate is engaged with the pin 123 the inner sash I is freed whereas the outer sash remains locked .to the main sash frame.

An alternative form of lock L for the two sashes is shown in Figs. 14l9. This lock involves rotary rather than sliding movements of the parts, and comprises a pillow block 125 afiixed to the free edge of the outer sash 0 and a shaft 126 which is rotatably supported therein. Carried fixedly by the shaft at its outer end is a locking disc 127 which may be of generally semi-circular contour having its periphery extending through slightly more than 180. At the opposite end of the shaft is fixed an operating handle 12% in the form of an elongated bar which is rotatively disposed transversely of the chord edge 129 of the disc 127. The length of the shaft is such that the disc lies slightly to the outside of the outer sash O and the handle 128 lies about opposite the inner edge of the inner sash I so as to be engageable therewith. The inner faces of the handle at opposite ends may be rounded through a curve as at 130 to facilitate movement into and out of engaging position.

The main sash frame in this construction is provided with an inwardly extending keeper 132 wherein is a slot 133 extending downwardly from its upper edge. This slot is opposite the disc 127 which is positioned to engage therein in response to rotation of the shaft 126.

Three positions of the disc are indicated in the several figures of the drawing. In the first (see Figs. 1415) the disc is disengaged from the keeper 132,. but the handle 128 is engaged with the inner face of the inner sash I. Since the shaft 126 is carried by the pillow block .1125 which is afiixed to the outer sash 0 there is in this adjustment of the parts an interconnection between the two sashes so that they are locked together but free for concurrent swinging movement out of the main sash frame S after which, by a further adjustment of the shaft.126,they may be freed from each other.

A second position of the lock is shown in Figs. 16-17. Here the shaft has been rotated through 90 to position the disc 127 within the slot 133 of the keeper. Obviously the outer sash O is locked to the main sash frame S when the parts are thus positioned. The handle, however, is vertically disposed so as to be free of engagement with the inner sash I whereby the latter is free to move independently of the outer sash O. In Figs. l8l9 a third position is illustrated, the shaft here being moved through .a further distance of 90 wherein the disc 127 still remains engaged with the keeper 132. However, in this position the elongated handle 12.8 has moved through 180 from the position of Figs. 14-15 so that its opposite end is now in engagement with the inner face of the inner sash I, thus locking the two sashes to each other and also to the main sash frame S.

By means such as are illustrated in Figs. 12 and 13 wherein a lock of the sliding type is indicated, or as illustrated in Figs. 14-l9 wherein a lock of the rotary type is indicated, we provide a simple and effective means for (a) locking the inner and outer sashes I and 0 together but not to the supporting sash frame S, (b) for unlocking the inner and outer sashes I and 0 so that either or both may be moved independently of each other relative to the main sash frame S, or (c) locking the inner and outer sashes I and 0 together and also to the main sash frame "S whereby neither sash can be opened. Such a lock is desirably positioned substantially at the vertical center of .the twosashes so that it will be positioned at thesame Y 'height convenient for operation whether ornot these sashes be mounted to swing from the right sideor 'be inverted to swing from the left side in the manner hereinbefore explained.

The-casement unit of our invention presents numerous sulating strip and fastening at another 'point. wchan'gecan be made without any modification or addition 8 features offiadvantage. The rn'etallicparts are insulated from contact with the interior surfaces, the two sashes I andO "by gaskets o'f rubberiorthe'like and the window frame F'by low conductivity strips 44 of wood or the like. The attaching screws for the sheet return 46 are insulated'by the strips 44 wherein they 'are anchored.

Owing to the capacity of the two sashes to swing inwardly from the free edge of the main sash framewhen thelattet is swung outwardly, all glass surfaces are easy and accessible "for cleaning from the inside. The two sashes are pivoted on themain sash frame at a pointoppositeits axis of movement so as to swing clear of the main sash frame when the "latter is swung outwardly to its open position. Under such conditions, when only the inside sash is swung inwardly the two normally unexposed glass surfaces will'be'rnade available for cleaning. If both sashes The swung inwardly together, then both exteriorglass' surfaces become accessible. In these operations the main sash frame should, of course, be opened toapproximately'90.

'In a single unit comprising onewindow frame F the main sash frame S can be hinged to swing in either direction without any modification, simply by inverting the main sash "frame in the window frame. This is possible because the window frames F are cast and drilled to receive hinge pins fromthe main sash frame on all four corners. Inserts of [stainless steel or the like occupy the hinge 'h'oles'not'in use, and this is a'feature of advantage to the jobber or dealer since it obviates the need of carrying a double stock to cover both right-hand and left-hand swinging sash.

The double purpose 'fl'ex'ible gasket wherein the inside glass .pane i isibedded acts also as a Weatherstrip which seals the glass to the window frame F. 'The flexibility of this gasket allows the inner sash to seat itself resiliently against the outer sash whose gasket is pressed against the main sash frame S, thereby making an additional weather seal. The firstiseal is direct from the window frame tolthe pane instead "of fromthe frame to the sash as in conventional construction, and because of this fact it minimizes the possibility ofv leakage.

The glazing operation is simplified considerably. Single large panes of double strength glass may be bedded in a flexible gasket produced by extrusion or otherwiseywith aluminum .or stainless'steel surroundapplied thereto "andremovable for 'reglazing. Class divisions, if desired, are provided preferably on the outside 'of the sash, and the cleaning feature with the glass swinging awayfrom the sash prevents accumulations of dirt between the "glass and the divisions of the muntin bar system. Broken panes'm'a'ybe replaced'by removing the bedding gaskets and inserting new glass.

The "exterior trim, and interior return and trim, are also reduced'to a'minimum'. The frame design provides for integral exterior projecting flanges which are adequate to cover the siding or to serve as a brick mold. On "the interior the sheet metal return eliminates the need forplaster or a wood return and trim. The combination of the corner bead 'onthe metallic return is a unique featureof advantage. It allows the trim to be continuous from jamb to sill to jamb, and possibly across "the head as well. *Qther'types 'of metal return not using "the corner-bead would necessitate an objectionable break onthe interiorface of the return. Also thereturn of 'sheet metal is adjustable for various wall widths by sliding thesheet return along the wood or composition in This of partspan'd is=a vfeatur'eof advantage-for jobbers'wh'o would otherwise have tostock-parts forseveral wall widths.

The window frame is installed in the wall-by inserting itduto -'a presized-open'ing in the'frame or brick veneer 'wal-l, nailing through-the tabs on the ja-mb and flange or 'the headandsill-into the-sheathing. These jamb attachment tabs can be removed by bending back for assembly of multiple units, making possible a thin mull of perhaps no greater width than 2". This is very desirable for narrow line insulation, allowing maximum glass area for any opening size. No additional attachment tabs are necessary in a frame or brick veneer construction. On solid masonry buildings, single strap anchors fastened to the integral jamb attachment tabs are desirably used.

The head and sill are flashed integrally by the flange on the window frame F without additional parts. End jambs are flashed by inserting thin rolled metal jamb flashing strips behind the attaching tabs before insertion into the wall. This separate flashing is held to the frame by the bead or spline 38 that is forced into the cove a the back of the window frame.

From the manufacturing and installation standpoints the present window unit is advantageous in the various respects we have noted in detail. The various features described are desirably combined into a single casement unit, but this does not preclude use of certain of the features separately or independently where the conditions will so permit.

We claim:

1. In a casement unit, a window frame, a main sash frame mounted in the window frame to swing about a vertical axis adjacent one stile thereof, inner and outer sashes carried by the main sash frame and each mounted to swing independently or together about a vertical axis adjacent the free stile of the main sash frame, each sash comprising a surround, a thermal insulating gasket extended within the surround, and a pane of glass or the like bedded within the gasket and protected thereby from contact with the surround of the associated sash, the gasket within one surround being extended exteriorly thereof toward the adjacent window frame for engagement therewith and constituting substantially the sole point of contact therebetween.

2. A casement unit according to claim 1 in which the window frame and main sash frame are both produce from metal and wherein the exteriorly extended gasket is extended toward the window frame for engagement therewith to constitute substantially the sole point of contact therebetween, and wherein the gasket within the other surround is extended exteriorly thereof toward the main sash frame for engagement therewith to constitute substantially the sole point of contact therebetween.

3. A casement unit according to claim 1 in which the main sash frame is produced from metal and wherein the gasket exteriorly extended from one of the surrounds is extended toward the main sash frame for engagement therewith to constitute substantially the sole point of contact therebetween.

4. In a casement unit, a window frame, a main sash frame mounted in the window frame to swing about a vertical axis adjacent one stile thereof, a sash carried by the main sash frame and mounted to swing about a vertical axis adjacent the free stile of the main sash frame, the sash comprising a surround, a thermal insulat ing gasket extended within the surround, and a pane of glass or the like bedded within the gasket and protected thereby from contact therewith, the gasket being 10 extended exteriorly of the surround toward the adjacent main sash frame for engagement therewith and conlstituting substantially the sole point of contact therewit 5. A casement unit comprising a main sash frame for reception within the window frame of a building structure and mounted at one edge for movement about an axis, inner and outer confronting sashes carried by the main sash frame and mounted to swing independently of each other about axes parallel to said first axis and located proximate to the free stile of the main sash frame, locking means carried by the window frame in cooperative relation with the main sash frame to secure the same in closed position, and other locking means for securing the two sashes to each other and to the main sash frame to prevent opening movement of either sash.

6. In a casement unit, a main sash frame mounted to swing about an axis, inner and outer sashes carried by the main sash frame and each mounted to individually swing about an axis parallel to said first axis adjacent the free stile of the main sash frame, and means for selectively releasably retaining said inner and outer sashes in fixed relation to each other and to the main sash frame.

7. A casement unit according to claim 6 wherein said means includes a slotted plate slidably carried by one of said sashes, headed pins on each of the other sashes and engaged in slots of said plate for successive disengagement therefrom.

8. A casement unit according to claim 6 wherein said means includes a slotted plate slidably and non-removably carried by one of said sashes, headed pins on each of the other sashes and engaged in slots of said plate for successive disengagement therefrom.

9. A casement unit according to claim 6 wherein the vertical swing axes of the inner and outer sashes are coincidental.

10. A casement unit according to claim 6 wherein a bar system simulating muntins is carried bythemainsash frame adjacent the exterior of the outer sash and independently thereof to permit free swinging movement of the inner and outer sashes inwardly and away from the bar system.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 853,902 Schweinler May 14, 1907 1,263,248 Hope Apr. 16, 1918 1,688,235 Hope Oct. 16, 1928 1,935,037 Madsen Nov. 14, 1933 2,004,651 Cook June 11, 1935 2,094,294 Garritsen Sept. 28, 1937 2,162,463 Schunk June 13, 1939 2,184,553 Johnson et a1. Dec. 26, 1939 2,191,660 Hirschey Feb. 27, 1940 2,269,506 Anderson Jan. 13, 1942 2,326,549 Miller Aug. 10, 1943 2,524,105 Hacker Oct. 3, 1950 FOREIGN PATENTS 23,985 Great Britain Oct. 19, 1909 13,218 Great Britain May 31, 1910 617,598 Germany Aug. 22, 1935 62,125 Norway Dec. 2, 1940

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2889900 *May 3, 1956Jun 9, 1959Woodlin Metal ProductsWindow and storm sash assembly
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Classifications
U.S. Classification160/40, 49/490.1, 160/218, 160/183, 49/67, 49/65, 49/382
International ClassificationE06B3/26, E06B3/04
Cooperative ClassificationE06B3/2605, E06B2003/2615
European ClassificationE06B3/26C