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Publication numberUS2717383 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 13, 1955
Filing dateMay 2, 1955
Priority dateMay 2, 1955
Publication numberUS 2717383 A, US 2717383A, US-A-2717383, US2717383 A, US2717383A
InventorsStobb Anton R
Original AssigneeWestern Printing & Lithographi
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotary type stitching machine
US 2717383 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 1-3, 1955 A. R. STOBB 2,717,333

ROTARY TYPE STITCHING MACHINE Filed May 2, 1955 Tmum Mi ANTON R. STOBB 5 fla ATTORNEY Sept. 13, 1955 A. R. STOBB 2,717,383

ROTARY TYPE STITCHING MACHINE Filed May 2, 1955 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 0 u; .n hl- -4|| /Nl EN7'OR: ANTON R. STOBB ATTORNEY Sept. 13, 1955 A. R. STOBB ROTARY TYPE STITCHING MACHINE 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed May 2, 1955 //Vl E/V7 OR.' ANTON R. STOBB ATTORNEV United States Patent 2,717,383 ROTARY TYPE STITCHING MACHINE Anton R. Stobb, Racine, Wis., assignor to Western Printing & Lithographing Co., Racine, Wis., a corporation of Wisconsin Application May 2, 1955, Serial No. 505,385 16 Claims. (Cl. 17)

This invention pertains to stitching or stapling machines, and, more particularly, it pertains to a rotary type stitching machine.

It is intended that the stitching machine of this invention be employed to staple signatures and covers together to form books, and thus the following description will be directed accordingly. Stitching machines of a type which comprises a pair of rotating members in substantially rolling contact with a stapler on one member and an anvil on the other member are known. This type of machine has been employed to continuously rotate while signatures are passed between the two members to be stapled into books.

However, it is commonly accepted that rotary staplers of the known type are not preferred since the staples can not be accurately and securely positioned into the signatures. One objectionable function of the known type of rotary stitcher is that the rotating member continuously supports the staple in a position which is radial to the center of rotation of the member and at an angle to the signature. Also, the anvil is not aligned with the staple as the anvil too is radial with respect to the center of rotation of its supporting member. This arrangement is known to result in inferior stitching or stapling and it will not achieve the speed of modern day requirements.

Therefore, it is an object of this invention to provide a rotary type stitching machine wherein the staples and the anvil or clincher plate are maintained aligned through the stitching process phase of rotation and thereby improve operation.

Another object of this invention is to provide a stitching machine of the rotary type wherein the staple is applied substantially transverse to the paper throughout the stitching operation.

Another object is to provide a rotary type stitching machine wherein the stapler head and the anvil or clincher plate are radially movable during the stitching process to effect improved operation.

Still another and general object of this invention is to provide a stitching or stapling machine which is efficient, fast, and accurate in operation.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent upon reading the following description in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein,

Fig. 1 is a side perspective view of a fragment of a pre: ferred embodiment of this invention.

Fig. 2 is a sectional view taken along the line 22 of Fig. 1 with certain parts broken away, additional parts added, and with parts in a different rotated position.

Figs. 3, 4, and 5 are sectional views similar to the view of Fig. 2 but with parts broken away and with parts in progressively different positions.

Fig. 6 is an exploded perspective view of certain parts shown in the previous views.

Fig. 7 is a sectional view taken along the line 77 of Fig. 4.

Similar reference numerals refer to the same parts throughout the views.

Fig. 1 shows a fragment of a rotatable stapler or stitcher section 10 and a fragment of a rotatable anvil or clincher section 11 with the two sections rotatable, in the direction of the arrows shown, to be in approximate rolling contact. Only one-half of. each of the sections 10 and 11 is shown as the sections actually include a left hand side which is not shown but which, with the right hand side shown, permits the positioning of two staples with each rotation of the sections. The section 10 consists of a rotatable shaft 12 suitably mounted in a bearing 13 on a frame 14. Similarly, the section 11 consists of a rotatable shaft 16 which is mounted in a bearing 17 in the frame 14. Mounted onto the shaft 12 is a pair of side plates 18 and 19 which rotate with the shaft 12 to convey the stitching mechanism 21 disposed between the plates. The mechanism 21 is described later.

Wire feed mechanism 22 is mounted stationarily above the section 10 to pass wire 23 to the section 10 through straighteners and feeders shown at 24. Since the mechanism 22 is of a conventional construction employed in feeding wire into a rotary stitcher, no further explanation of the mechanism will be given. Also, the usual forming shoe 26 is stationarily mounted adjacent the mechanism 22 to form the staple, as described later. Thus, upon rotation of the stitcher section 10, a staple blank is picked up by the stitching mechanism 21 and is formed into a staple with each rotation of the section as'the staple blank is conveyed downwardly along the shoe to the bottom of the section 10 and the end of the shoe as seen in the Fig. 3 position. A guide or shelf 27 is stationarily disposed tangentially to the lower edge of the section 10 to support signatures or sheets of paper 28 or the like. The latter are thus fed between the sections 10 and 11 to be stapled together in two places, as desired.

To accomplish this, it is preferred that the section 11 be provided with a gripper 29 to hold the paper to the section 11 by pivoting the gripper and clamping the paper to a bar 31 forming a part of the circumference of the section 11. The latter is shown to include a circular end plate 32 non-rotatable with respect to the shaft 16, to which the bar can be bolted to extend across the section 11 to the opposite end plate (not shown) on the omitted left hand half of the section 11. The gripper 29 is suitably attached to a rock shaft 33 extended through the end plate 32 to engage one end of a link 34 with the other end of the latter attached to a cam follower 36. A cam 37 is mounted in any conventional manner to be stationary and guide the follower during rotation of the section 11 to rock the shaft 33, see Fig. 2. A spring 38 is shown attached between the follower end of the link 34 and the shaft 16 to maintain the follower in contact with the cam. Thus, the paper 28 is fed off the shelf 27 and under the end of the gripper 29 which is then spaced from the bar 31 by the cam action as the gripper is positioned adjacent the end of the shelf. The paper signature is then carried around with the rotation of the section 11, as shown in Fig. 2, and is stapled usually along its center line which is the fold line in the book. The section 11 is shown formed cylindrically with a rim 39 suitably bolted to the end plate 32 and with a cylinder 41 boltedto the rim 39 to extend across the width of the section 11.

Also attached to the section 11 is a clincher plate or anvil 42, shown best in Figs. 3, 4, 5, and 7, which will be described later. For present, it is noted that the anvil 42 is disposed on the section 11 to align with the stitching mechanism 21 of the section 10 and mate therewith during the stapling phase of rotation.

Referring again to the stitching mechanism 21, Figs. 1 through 6 show the mechanism in its various positions in the stitching cycle. In Fig. 1, the mechanism is in a rotated position prior to picking up a staple blank and just after applying the previous staple. The section 10 continues to rotate from the Fig. 1 position to the Fig. 2 position where the wire 23 is fed across the path of the mechanism 21 for a wire cutter and outside former member 43 to shear the wire, in the well-known manner of co-action with the wire mechanism'22, upon passing the wire at the Fig. 2 position. The straight, cut end of the wire is then nested in a notch 44, located on opposite sides 46 of the member 43, as the wire extends across thelatter. The sides 46 are subsequently snugly disposed one on each side of a rail 47 of the shoe 26 which guides the staple blank against the member 43 as the rotation of the section 10 continues. Fig. 2 shows the shoe eccentric to the section 10 and the staple blank is, therefore, progressively bent over the rail 47 to form the usual U- shaped staple with the ends of the staple disposed on each side of the rail 47. The member 43 is also provided witha pair of grooves 48, disposed with one groove in each side 46, along which the legs of the staple are guided as the staple is formed. The member 43 is, therefore, a staple supporting means which receives the staple blank or wire and holds the staple. A formed staple 45, in its relative position, is shown in Fig. 6. Since the foregoing, regarding the cutting and form ng of a staple, is conventional, no further description thereof is deemed to be necessary.

To effect the rotation of the mechanism 21 with the shaft 12, it is shown that a rock shaft 49 is offset and parallel to the shaft 12 to extend through the plates 18 and 19 with the shaft 49 supported by an arm 50. nonrotatably attached to the shaft 12 but providing abushing for the shaft 49. A lever or arm 51 is keyed at one end thereof to the shaft 49 and between the plates with the arm opposite end extended to the member 43 where the arm is bifurcated to rotatably attach to a plunger 52 through a pin 53. The plunger 52 is snugly disposed between the sides 46 of the member 43 to be slidable therewithin upon movement of the arm 51 caused by rocking of the shaft 49. The rocking motion is effected by a cam follower 54, shown in Figs. 1 and 2, which is attached offset to the shaft 49 through an arm 56 to be non-rotatable with respect to the shaft 49. A cam 57 is disposed in a piece 60 attached to the frame 14 to receive the cam follower 54 and, of course, cause the follower to rock the arm 56 and, consequently, the shaft 49 during rotation of the section 10.

It should thus be understood that upon rotation of the section 10, the plates 18 and 19 and the shaft 49 are likewise rotated. Then, when the cam follower 54 reaches a rise in the cam 57, such as in the Fig. 3 position, the shaft 49 is rocked to rotate the arm 51 about the shaft 49 and slide the plunger 52 within the member 43. Since the plunger is snugly disposed between the sides 46 of the member 43, a staple disposed in the grooves 48 of the member 43 will be pushed from the member 43 as the plunger moves downwardly. The staple is thus inserted into the paper 28 as the plunger continues to move downwardly to the Fig. 5 position. Of course, at this position the section 10 has been rotated to where the plunger 52 is beyond the end of the forming shoe 26.

It will be observed that another important movement of the plunger 52 and the member 43 takes place as they are progressively repositioned during the stapling phase of rotation of section 10 to have the plunger and the grooves 48 in the member 43, and, consequently, the staple itself, radial to the center of the section 11. The desirableness of radially positioning the staple with respect to the section 11 is to cause the staple to be aligned with the anvil 42 during the stapling phase of rotation. To accomplish this, the plates 18 and 19 are provided with a pair of arcuate grooves 58 which receive arcuate projections or guides 59 disposed on opposite sides 61 of a member 62. The latter, as best shown in Fig. 6, is hollow to receive the member 43 and the plunger 52 while cross pieces 63 and 64 connect the sides 61 of the member 62 with the plunger abutting the pieces 63 and 64. As shown, the manner of relating the member 43 to the member 62 is through a dovetail with two projections 66 slidably received in two guide slots 67. With this arrangement, the rotative movement described with respect to the lever 51 is transferred through the plunger 52 to the member 62 as the sectionli) rotates to the Fig.

5 position. The member 62 is constrained to slide in the grooves 58. The cam, the lever arm, and the grooves 58 are so arranged that the motions described cause the plunger 52 to remain radial to the section 11.

It should also be noted that the member 43 is adjustably connected to the member 62 through an elongated slot 68 and a pin 69. The latter is snugly received in holes 71 in the member 62 while the member 43 contains upper and lower threaded holes 72 into which bolts 73 are disposed to abut the pin 69 as desired to adjustably position the member 43 with the member 62. Of course, when the section 10 moves from the Fig. 5 position to the Fig. 2 position, the cam causes the lever 51 to push, through the plunger 52, against cross piece 74 of the member 43 and therethrough to the member 62 which is thus re-positioned in the grooves 58.

The section 11 includes the anvil or clincher member 42 which is shown radially disposed and flanked by bars 76 and 77 which are suitably bolted at their ends 'to the end plate 32, as shown in Fig. 1. Figs. 3, 4, and 7 best show the mechanism 42 and the'attachment thereof to the section 11. The bar 76 is preferably recessed at 78 to receive a projection on a bar 79 which is extended below the bar 76 and attached to it by bolts 81 as shown in full in Fig. 1. The bar 79 supports a guide plate 82 attached to the bar 79 by screws 83 with the plate 82 radially disposed on the section 11 and nested in an opening 84 in the bar 76. The plate 82 contains a center groove 86 to slidably receive a pusher S7 with the latter supported on all four sides by the plate 82 and limited in upward sliding movement by a cross piece 88 on the radial outer end of the plate 82. The pusher 87 is shown to include a cut-out 89 into which hooked ends 91 of a pair of clinchers 92 are secured while the clinchers 92.are

pivoted about pins 93. The latter are secured between opposite sides of the guide plate 82 which is hollowed to receive the clinchers 92, as shown in Fig. 3. This arrangement is such that sliding motion of the pusher 87 in the guide plate82 causes the clinchers 92 to pivot and thus move their ends 94 radially of the section 11 as the latter rotates through the positions of Figs. 3 .toS.

It should be understood that the .clinchers 92 are each aligned with an end of the staple applied by the stitcher. In the Fig. 3 position, the clincher ends 94 are below the pins 93, as the pusher is down, and the top edges of the ends 94, therefore, form inclines down which the staple ends slide to be turned inwardly toward each other as in the well-known bending of. staples. Continued operation causes the pusher to rise to ,the Fig. 4 position, which is the Fig. 7 position also, to where the clincher ends 94 are level with the pins 93 and the staple ends have then been turned inwardly and upwardly to start clamping the paper. In the Fig. 5 position, the clincher ends 94 are disposed upwardly to where the ends of the staple are finally imbedded into the paper.

To cause the pusher 87 to slide within the plate 82, it is preferred that the lower or radially inward end 96 of the pusher 87 be received in a bifurcated end 97 of a lever98. The latter is fulcrumed at a pin 99 connecting the center of the lever and a piece 181 which is attached by a bolt 102 to the bar 79. The opposite end of the lever 98 is shown projected through an opening in the end plate to transversely abut a rod 103 slidably disposed in a bracket 104 attached by a bolt 106 to the outside of the end plate. Thus, depressing of the rod 103 causes the lever 98 to pivot about the pin 99 and raise the end 97 of the lever to actuate the pusher 87. A compression spring 107 is disposed below the lever 98 to be supported on the shaft 16 of the section 11 and engage a rod 108 which abuts the lever 98 to transmit the force of the spring to the lever and maintain the latter urged yieldingly upwardly at its outer end.

Fig. 1 shows the section 10 is provided with a projecting .bolt 10!) attached to an :arm 111 non-rotatably secured to the shaft '12. Thebolt 109 is disposed'to abut the rod 103, upon rotation of the sections, and the rod is then depressed for the action described.

It is further preferred that an endless guide belt 112 be disposed over rollers 113 located to guide the belt and thus the paper over the section 11. The rollers 113 are shown mounted on shafts 114 which are attached to the frame 14. With this construction, the paper 28 is guided off the shelf 27 and partly around the circumference of the section 11 to be disposed between the clincher 42 and the stapler head or stitcher head 21, and the paper 1 is thus under complete control of the stitcher machine.

Thus, there is provided a rotary type of stitcher wherein the stitcher head is movable in a manner to remain aligned with the clincher to permit the staple to penetrate the paper perpendicularly thereto. The staple can then be more accurately located and a better stitch results. Also, as seen in Figs. 2 to 5, the head is disposed at a reclining angle, with respect to the forming shoe 26, and the staple, therefore, is also at that angle, and this efiects an improvement in the forming of the staple. The staple 45, disposed in the grooves 48, is somewhat pushed across the shoe 26 rather than dragged or pulled thereacross due to the reclined angle as contrasted to a right angle between the staple and the shoe. There is less resistance from the shoe on the wire and the staple is already at the desired angle when the stitching is commenced.

While a specific embodiment of this invention has been shown and described, it should be obvious that certain changes could be made within the scope of this invention, which should, therefore, be limited only by the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In a rotary stitcher, the combination comprising a first member rotatably mounted, a second member rotatably mounted eccentric to said first member to be substantially in rolling contact therewith through a stitching phase of rotation, a stitcher head movably mounted onto said first member, a stitcher anvil disposed on the circumference of said second member to be adjacent said head through said stitching phase of rotation, means on said first member engaged with said head for actuating the latter to maintain said head on a radial line with respect to said second member and to move said head along said radial line through said stitching phase of rotation.

2. In a rotary stitcher, the combination comprising a rotatable member, a stitcher head movably mounted onto said member adjacent the periphery thereof for supporting a staple in a position radial of a point eccentric to said member and during a stitching phase of rotation, means on said member for moving said head with respect to said member in response to rotation of said member for maintaining said staple radial and for moving said staple along the radial line during said phase of rotation of said member whereby said staple is passed into paper supported adjacent said member.

3. In a rotary stitcher for securing a signature in a book form, the combination comprising a rotatable member, a stapler head movably mounted onto said member adjacent the periphery thereof, a staple blank feeder for positioning a staple onto said head, means operable in response to rotation of said member and during a stitching phase of rotation of said member for moving said head with respect to said member to maintain said head radially disposed to a point eccentric to said member whereby said staple is stitched into said signature transverse thereto.

4. In a rotary stitcher for securing a signature into book form, the combination comprising a first member rotatably mounted, a second member rotatably mounted eccentric to said first member to be in synchronized and substantially rolling contact therewith through a phase of rotation, means on said second member for gripping said signature to the circumference of said second member during rotation thereof, a stitcher head mounted onto said first member to be disposed on the circumference thereof for movement with respect thereto in an arcuate path about a point on said circumference and for movement radial to said second member for stitching said signature with a staple, an anvil disposed on the circumference of said second member adjacent said signature to be adjacent said head through said phase of rotation for receiving said staple and fastening it to said signature, means on said first member engaged with said head for moving the latter in said arcuate path in response to rotation of said first member for maintaining said head radially disposed with respect to said second member through said phase of rotation whereby said staple is stitched into said signature at an angle transverse thereto.

5. A rotary stitcher comprising in combination a rotatable member, a stapler head mounted on said member to be disposed adjacent the periphery thereof for movement with respect thereto in the plane transverse to the axis of said member, a cam mounted to the side of said member, a cam follower connected to said head and mounted on said member for engagement with said cam to actuate said head in response to'rotation of said member and during a phase of rotation for moving a part of said head on said member and in said plane along a line radial to a point outside of said member and in said plane and for rotating all of said head to be radially disposed with respect to said point through said phase of rotation of said member.

6. In a rotary stitcher, the combination comprising a first member rotatably mounted, a second member rotatably mounted eccentric to said first member to be in substantial rolling contact therewith through a stitching phase of rotation, a staplerplunger mounted onto said first member for movement in a plane transverse to the axis of rotation of said member, an anvil disposed on the circumference of said second member to be adjacent said plunger through said stitching phase of rotation, cam means engaged with said plunger for actuating the latter in said plane during said stitching phase of rotation to maintain said plunger in a position radial with respect to said second member through said stitching phase of rotation.

7. A rotary stitcher for stapling papers together, the combination comprising a first rotatable member, a stitcher plunger mounted on said member movement with respect to said member in a plane transverse to the axis of rotation of said member for pushing a staple into said papers, a second rotatable member disposed adjacent said first rotatable member to be substantially in rolling contact therewith during the stapling phase of rotation, a stitcher anvil disposed on said second rotatable member to be juxtaposed to said stitcher'plunger through said stapling phase of rotation, a paper gripper attached to said second rotatable member to carry said papers therewith upon rotation of said second rotatable member to dispose said papers between said stitcher plunger and said stitcher anvil, means on said first rotatable member and connected to said stitcher plunger for activating the latter in said plane in response to rotation of said first rotatable member and during said stapling phase of rotation for maintaining said stitcher plunger in alignment with respect to said stitcher anvil and for moving said stitcher plunger toward said anvil to push a staple into said papers.

8. In a rotary stitcher for stapling papers together, the combination comprising a first rotatable member,

stitcher mechanism mounted on said member to be movable with respect to said member and in a plane transverse to the aXis of rotation of said member for pushing a staple into said papers, means on said mechanism for receiving a staple and maintaining it thereon during a phase of rotation, a second rotatable member disposed adjacent said first rotatable member to be in rolling contact therewith during the stapling phase of rotation whereby said papers can be passed between said members, a stitcher anvil disposed on said second rotatable member to be juxtaposed to said stitcher mechanism through said stapling phase of rotation, actuating means on. said first rotatable member and connected for said: stitcher mechanism to moving the latter in said plane in response. to rota.- tion of said first rotatable member and during said stapling phase of rotation for disposing said stitcher mechanism in a position wherein said staple is aligned with respect to said stitcher anvil and for moving said stitcher mechanism toward said anvil to push said staple transversely intosaid papers.

9. In rotary stitcher, the combination comprising a first section rotatably mounted, a second section rotatably mounted eccentric to said first section to be in synchronized rolling contact therewith through a stitching phase of rotation whereby material to be stitched can be passed between said sections, a stitcher mechanism mounted onto said first section to be disposed thereon for movement with respect thereto in an arcuate path about a point radially outwardly of said mechanism and for movement radial to said second section for stitching said material with a staple, an anvil disposed on said second section to be adjacent said mechanism through said stitching phase of rotation for receiving said staple and fastening it to said material, means on said first section engaged with said mechanism for moving the latter in said arcuate path in response to rotation of said first section for maintaining said mechanism radially disposed with respect to said second section through said stitching phase of rotation whereby said staple is stitched into said material at an angle transverse thereto.

10. A rotary stitcher comprising in combination a rotatable shaft, a stapler head connected to said shaft for rotation therewith and for movement with respect thereto in the plane transverse to the axis of said shaft, said head including a member rotatable with respect to said shaft about a point located radially away from said shaft beyond said member with said point being rotatable with said head and said head also including a plunger disposed Within said member to be slidably guided by said member, cam means attached to said plunger for actuating said head in response to rotation of said member and during the stitching phase of rotation thereof for movement of said plunger in said plane along a line radial to said point beyond said member and for rotation of said head for radially disposing the latter with respect to said point through said stitching phase of rotation of said member.

11. In a rotary stitcher for securing a signature in a book form, the combination comprising a rotatable member, a stapler head mounted onto said member for rotation therewith and movement with respect thereto, staple supporting means on said head, a wire feeder adjacent the path of rotation of said head for positioning a wire onto said staple supporting means, a forming shoe arcuately disposed adjacent the path of rotation of said head to extend in the direction of rotation of said member from said feeder to the point of stapling for co-acting with said head for forming said Wire into a staple during rotation of said head, means operable in response to rotation of said member for moving said head with respect to said member for maintaining said head in a position for said staple to be disposed at a reclined angle to said shoe with respect to the direction of rotation of said member as said staple is moved along the arcuate path of said shoe.

12. In a rotary stitcher, the combination comprising a first shaft rotatably mounted, a second shaft mounted parallel and eccentric to said first shaft and attached thereto be rotatable therewith and rockable with respect thereto, a stapler plunger attached to said second shaft for movement in a plane transverse to the axis of rotation of each said shaft, and means for imparting rocking movement to said second shaft for maintaining saidplunger in a position radial with respect to a point eccentric to each said shaft and for moving said plunger on the imaginary line between said plunger and said pair of allochirally disposed clinchers secured. to the. radially outer end of said plate for pivotal movement in a plane radial to said shaft, a rod attached to said section to be radially disposed thereon and movable with respect thereto, means connecting said rod and said clinchers for transmitting the movement of said rod to said clinchers, a stitcher section rotatably mounted eccentric to said anvil section, means on said=stitcher sec:

tion for contacting said rod upon rotation. of. each said section whereby said clinchers. are pivoted radially to said anvil section.

14-. in a rotary stitcher for passing a staple into a signature of papers, the combination comprising an anvil section including a rotatable shaft, a clincher attached to said shaft to rotate therewith and bedisposed thereon.

in a radial plane and movable with respect to said shaft and in said radial plane, a stitchersection rotatably mounted eccentric to said anvilv section, means operable between said anvil section and saidstitcher section upon 3 rotation thereof for actuating said clincher into movement in said radial plane.

15. In a rotary stitcher for passing astaple into a signature of papers, the combination comprising an anvil section including a rotatable shaft, a pair of allochirally disposed clinchers pivotally attached to said sectionv to rotate therewith and be disposed thereon in a radial plane and movable with respect to said shaft and in said radial plane, a stitcher section: rotatably mounted eccentric to said anvil section whereby said signature can be passed between said sections, means on said. stitcher section for supporting a U-shaped' staple in :1

position with the legs of said staple aligned with said clinchers during the stapling phase of stitcher rotation and said means being forthe passing of said staple into said signature when the latter is passed between said sections, means operable between said anvil section and said stitcher section upon rotation thereof for pivoting said clinchers in said radial plane with said clinchers pivoted radially inwardly at the start of said stapling; phase of rotation for bending the legs of said' staple toward each other. upon abutting engagement with said clinchers and with said clinchers pivoted radially outwardly at the end of said stapling phase of rotation for continued bending of said legs of said staple into a clinched position on said signature;

16. in a rotary stitcher for passing: a. staple into papers. or the like, the combination of an anvil section including: a rotatable shaft, a pair of allochirally disposed clinchers attached to said section to: rotate therewith. and; be movable with respect to said shaft, astitcher section rosections, means for moving saidclinchers forbending the legs of said staple toward each other and into a clinched position on said papersduring the stapling phase of stitcher rotation.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 510,844 Crowell Dec. 1 2', 1893 1,343,231 Sheldon Iune- F5; 1920 2,026,135 Meyer Dec; 3 1, 1935 2,104,452 Crafts Jan; 4 1938 2,207,413 Quick J'uly- 9, 1 940

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3762622 *Mar 31, 1971Oct 2, 1973Tolerans AbApparatus for stitching a continuously running web
US4478398 *Jul 16, 1982Oct 23, 1984Stobb, Inc.System for routing a signature for stitching using a lift finger
US4650174 *Mar 5, 1984Mar 17, 1987Stobb Inc.Method and system for routing a signature for stitching
US5098002 *May 23, 1990Mar 24, 1992Ferag AgMulti-sheet print products
US5464199 *Dec 23, 1993Nov 7, 1995Ferag AgGathering stapler for printed products comprising folded printed sheets
US5772097 *May 20, 1996Jun 30, 1998Koenig & Bauer-Albert AktiengesellschaftFor binding signatures in a folding apparatus of a rotary printing press
US5848745 *May 13, 1996Dec 15, 1998Koenig & Bauer-Albert AktiengesellschaftStitching device
US7041005 *Sep 15, 2004May 9, 2006Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Method for manufacturing and golf club head
US7704164Oct 16, 2008Apr 27, 2010Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Method for manufacturing and golf club head
US7854364Jul 9, 2007Dec 21, 2010Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club head having a composite crown
US8096896Dec 21, 2010Jan 17, 2012Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club head having a composite crown
US8287402Jan 12, 2012Oct 16, 2012Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club head having a composite crown
US8568248Oct 16, 2012Oct 29, 2013Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club head having a composite crown
US8579726Mar 23, 2010Nov 12, 2013Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Method for manufacturing and golf club head
DE3325173A1 *Jul 8, 1983Jan 26, 1984Stobb IncVerfahren und vorrichtung zur handhabung von aus gefalzten bogen bestehenden signaturen zum zwecke der heftung
EP0744287A2 *May 14, 1996Nov 27, 1996KOENIG & BAUER-ALBERT AKTIENGESELLSCHAFTStapling device
WO1996036492A1 *May 13, 1996Nov 21, 1996Hillebrand Bernd AntonStitching device
Classifications
U.S. Classification227/81
International ClassificationB42B4/00, B42B4/02
Cooperative ClassificationB42B4/02
European ClassificationB42B4/02