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Publication numberUS2718892 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 27, 1955
Filing dateOct 29, 1949
Priority dateOct 29, 1949
Publication numberUS 2718892 A, US 2718892A, US-A-2718892, US2718892 A, US2718892A
InventorsHolderman Jim D
Original AssigneeHolderman Jim D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tobacco pipe
US 2718892 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

, United States PatentOfiice 2,718,892 Patented Sept. 27, 1955 TOBACCO PIPE Jim D. Holderman, Hoquiam, Wash.

Application October 29, 1949, Serial No. 124,359

2 Claims. (Cl. 131-196) This invention relates to improvements in tobacco pipes of the type with a spaced inner bowl, special smoke passages and a liner for the stem.

One of the primary objects of this invention is to pro vide the user with a choice of temperatures of smoke and to provide means whereby the smoker may adjust the smoke temperature as the pipe increases in temperature during use.

Another object is to provide a mellow, sweet-tasting pipe and to reduce the moisture and impurities usually passing through the pipe stem to the users mouth.

A further object is to provide a simple, inexpensive pipe, easily cleaned and sanitary.

p The object of adjustable temperatures is met by the use of a rotatable inner bowl so constructed that smoke from the inner bowl must travel a variable portion of the circumference of the inner bowl, thereby condensing moisture and cooling the smoke. The user may set the inner bowl outlet near the stern passageway when he first lights the pipe, to obtain the dry, moderately temperatured smoke characteristic of a freshly lit pipe. The inner bowl may be rotated as moisture accumulates and the pipe temperature increases, so that the smoke must travel around the circumference of the inner bowl, a distance of approximately the entire circumference.

The dual objectives of obtaining the fresh smoke directly when first using the pipe and of later providing a condensing and cooling chamber when the pipe becomes moist and hot are believed to be new to the art. It should be noted that some pipes with condensing and cooling chambers are not as simple and inexpensive as my invention or as easy to clean. The appearance of the pipe is favorable compared to some pipes with condensing chambers because the condensing space is not cumbersome and the conventional pipe shape is maintained.

A briar inner bowl and a briar tube in the stem provide a mellow, sweet-tasting pipe, after the products of combustion have permeated the briar, a characteristic quality of briar pipes. My invention has advantages over the usual briar pipe because stickiness and odor are reduced and sanitation is improved by having an outer stem and outer bowl made of material impervious to the products of combustion.

Much moisture and impurities are collected in the chambers and passageways, thereby not passing to the smokers mouth.

The means whereby these and other objects are accomplished in my invention will best be understood, however, from the following description of specific embodiments, when read in connection with the accompanying drawings:

Figure 1 is a view of a longitudinal vertical section of a pipe constructed according to my invention;

Figure 2 is an end view, with certain portions broken away and shown in section;

Figure 3 is a horizontal sectional view taken along line 3--3 of Figure 2;

Figure 4 is a view of a partial vertical section through a pipe of an alternative form of construction;

Figure 5 is a perspective view of the detachable bowl of the pipe shown in Figure 4.

Referring to the details of the drawings, attention is called to the stem 10 and the outer bowl 14. These may be made of material impervious to the products of combustion. Stickiness and odor are reduced by the use of such material and sanitation is improved. This material may be transparent so that the briar tube 16 and briar inner bowl 12 may be seen, adding to the attractiveness of the pipe.

The inner briar tube 16 extends from adjacent the bowl to adjacent the mouthpiece end of stem 10 and has a smoke passageway 15.

The briar tube 16 and briar inner bowl 12 are permeated by the products of combustion after the pipe has been smoked for a period of time. The pipe then affords the smoker a mellow, sweet-tasting smoke.

The removable, rotatable inner bowl 12 is positioned in an upwardly-open recess or cavity of the outer bowl 14. The inner bowl 12 has the upwardly-open fire chamber therein. The base of the inner bowl may be constructed in several different manners, as illustrated in Figures 1 and 4, and the inside of the outer bowl 14 is varied correspondingly.

Referring to Figures 1 and 2, the inner bowl 12 has a projection on its under surface, at 26, to fit into an indentation in the base of the outer bowl 14 at 28. There is a smoke outlet 20 in the inner bowl 12 at one side leading from the fire chamber to the space 34 between the bowls.

Referring to Figures 4 and 5, in another form of construction, the inner bowl 13 has a fiat under surface at 27 that fits on a flat rim in the base of the outer bowl 14 at 29 leaving a cup 36 between the under surface of the inner bowl 13 and the base of the outer bowl 14. There is a smoke outlet 22 leading from the inside of the inner bowl 13 to the cup 36 and a connecting smoke outlet 24 niched or notched in the surface of the inner bowl 13 leading from the cup 36 to one side past the contacting bowl surfaces to the space 34 between the bowls around the sides of the inner bowl 13.

The cup 36 and the space 34 between the inner bowl 13 and the outer bowl 14 serve to cool the smoke, condense the moisture in the smoke, and to collect the moisture and impurities thus preventing their passage through the stem passageway 15 to the users mouth.

In both constructions there is a space 34 between the bowls around the sides of the inner bowl 12, 13. Also in both there is intimate contact between the bowls at the top of the outer bowl 14. An extension 33 of the inner bowl 12, 13 projects over the rim 31 of the outer bowl 14. Between the adjacent vertical bowl walls contiguous said extension 33, is positioned a sealing ring 18 attached to the inner bowl 12, 13. The sealing ring 18 may be fitted into an indentation in the surface of the inner bowl 12, 13. The sealing ring 18, made of suitable elastic material, holds the inner bowl 12, 13 firmly in place, yet permits rotation of the bowl or easy removal for cleaning.

As illustrated in Figures 1 to 3, an upright bafile 40, attached to the outside of the inner bowl 12, contiguous the smoke outlet 20 and positioned in the space 34 between the bowls, will insure the passage of smoke through the space 34 in but one direction from the smoke outlet 20 to the stern passageway 15.

By rotating the inner bowl 12, the smoke must travel past-a variable portion of the circumference of the inner bowl 12. Because of the upright baflle 40, this portion of the circumference can be varied from 0 degrees to close to 360 degrees. Without the bafiie 40, the maximum arc of travel of the smoke would be 180 degrees.

There may be instead an'upright baffle 41 attached to the inner surface of the outer bowl 14 contiguous the stem passageway 15. This would perform substantially the same function as the other baffle 40 as regards preventing the flow of smoke in one direction is concerned. If both baffles 40, 41 are used, as shown in Figure 3, then the baifie 41 attached to the outer bowl 14 will act as a stop when the other baffie 40 attached to the inner bowl 12 abuts it. The use of two baffies 40, 41 enables the user to determine, by the angular position of the baffle 40 with respect to the baffie 41, the portion of the circumference of the inner bowl 12 the smoke must travel on its way to the stem passageway 15 even though the outer bowl 14 is made of oqaque material or is made of transparent material but has become clouded due to deposits on the inner surface, and the inner workings can not be seen.

In the Figures 4 and 5 construction, bafile 43 is secured to inner bowl 13 adjacent horizontal smoke passageway 24. Stop 45, corresponding to baflle 41 of the Figures 1 to 3 construction, is provided adjacent stern smoke passageway 15. Stop 45 does not completely span annular passageway 34 as it does not have to serve as a bafile; and it will be noted that bafiie 41 in Figure 1 could likewise be shortened to serve only as a stop if bafile 40 is used.

The smoker may desire to set the outlet 20, 24 at close to 0 degrees when the pipe is first lit to obtain directly the warm, dry smoke characteristic of a freshly lit pipe. The smoker may rotate the inner bowl 12 or 13 as the pipe becomes warmer and more moist, so that the smoke must pass through a longer portion of the circumference of the inner bowl, thereby cooling the smoke and condensing the moisture.

It should be noted that the pipe can be thoroughly cleaned by the mere removal of the inner bowl 12 or 13.

It will be seen that by the above described construction I provide for an adjustable cooling and condensation chamber for smoke in an inexpensive, sweet tasting pipe with improved odor and sanitation. The pipe is easy to clean and provides a condensation chamber while preserving the attractive conventional pipe shape.

While I have shown and described certain specific con structions, it is to be understood that these are merely illustrative and that the invention is limited only as set forth in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A pipe, comprising: an outer bowl having an upwardly-open recess therein and a stem extending from the side of said outer bowl having a stem passageway communicating with a side of said recess, an inner bowl movably mounted in said recess in a manner permitting manual rotation of said inner bowl through approximately 360 degrees, the outer bowl and inner bowl being in intimate circumferential contact at the top of said recess and near the bottom of said recess and being spaced apart between the points of intimate contact forming an annular smoke passageway therebetween, said inner bowl having an upwardly-open fire chamber therein and having a smoke outlet passageway from said fire chamber to said annular passageway between the bowls, an upright bafiie positioned in said annular passageway and spanning the same and secured to said inner bowl at one side of and adjacent to said smoke outlet passageway and preventing passage of smoke through said annular passageway in one direction from said smoke outlet passageway to said stem passageway, said outlet passageway being positionable by manual adjustment of the position of said inner bowl to cause the smoke from said fire chamber to travel any selected distance through said annular passageway from 0 degrees to approximately 360 degrees of the circumference of the sides of said inner bowl, and a stop positioned in said annular passageway adjacent said stem passageway and disposed to abut said baffle in one position of said inner bowl to thereby indicate the position of said baffie without disassembly of the bowls.

2. A pipe, comprising: an outer bowl having an upwardly-open recess therein and a stem extending from the side of said outer bowl having a stem passageway communicating with a side of said recess, an inner bowl movably mounted in said recess in a manner permitting manual rotation of said inner bowl through approximately 360 degrees, the outer bowl and inner bowl being in intimate circumferential contact at the top of said'recess and near the bottom of said recess and being spaced apart between the points of intimate contact forming an annular smoke passageway therebetween having a height of at least approximately one-half of the height of said recess, said inner bowl having an upwardly-open fire chamber therein and having only a single smoke outlet passageway from said fire chamber to said annular passageway between the bowls, an upright baffie positioned in said annular passageway and spanning the same and secured to said inner bowl at one side of and adjacent to said smoke outlet passageway and preventing passage of smoke through said annular passageway in one direction from said smoke outlet passageway to said stern passageway, said outlet passageway being positionable by manual adjustment of the position of said inner bowl to cause the smoke from saidfire chamber to travel any selected distance through said annular passageway from 0 degrees to approximately 360 degrees of the circumference of the sides of said inner bowl.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 286,020 Kilroy Oct. 2, 1883 1,402,536 Panoif Jan. 3, 1922 1,542,838 Prophet June 23, 1925 1,727,401 Freeman Sept. 10, 1929 1,980,594 Palmer Nov. 13, 1934 1,988,588 Ellsworth Jan. 22, 1935 2,061,786 Vollmann Nov. 24, 1936 2,093,014 Klickrnan Sept. 14, 1937 2,592,455 Mueller et a1. Apr. 8, 1952 FOREIGN PATENTS I 24,471 Great Britain 1896 29,959 Sweden Dec. 17, 1910 211,724 Great Britain 1924 229,072 Great Britain Feb. 19, 1925 417,561 Great Britain Oct. 8, 1934 474,728 Great Britain 1937 766,253 France 19-34

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US286020 *Oct 2, 1883 Tobacco-pipe
US1402536 *Jul 15, 1919Jan 3, 1922Panoff Nicholas BAttachment for pipes and cigar and cigarette holders
US1542838 *Jan 3, 1921Jun 23, 1925Reiss Premier Pipe CompanySmoking pipe
US1727401 *Dec 19, 1927Sep 10, 1929Freeman AlbertTobacco pipe
US1980594 *Feb 4, 1933Nov 13, 1934Frank N MarianiSmoking implement
US1988588 *Feb 6, 1934Jan 22, 1935Ellsworth Francis PTobacco pipe
US2061786 *Oct 4, 1935Nov 24, 1936Vollmann EduardTobacco pipe
US2093014 *Oct 25, 1935Sep 14, 1937Rudolph H KlickmanSmoker's pipe
US2592455 *Mar 10, 1947Apr 8, 1952Gerald W FossieckTobacco smoking pipe
FR766253A * Title not available
GB211724A * Title not available
GB229072A * Title not available
GB417561A * Title not available
GB474728A * Title not available
GB189624471A * Title not available
SE29959A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3422821 *Dec 6, 1967Jan 21, 1969Calkins Edward HAir insulated dry bowl pipe
US3468314 *Oct 5, 1967Sep 23, 1969Palmer Charles EPipe cartridge
US4121598 *Jun 14, 1977Oct 24, 1978Jack HornsbySmokers' pipes
US4362169 *Dec 5, 1980Dec 7, 1982Calkins Edward HAir flow dry bowl pipe
US4577645 *Dec 16, 1981Mar 25, 1986Calkins Edward HReduced moisture smoker's pipe
US4870979 *Dec 28, 1987Oct 3, 1989Gallaher LimitedSmoker's pipe
Classifications
U.S. Classification131/196, 131/204, 131/214, 131/226
International ClassificationA24F1/00, A24F1/10
Cooperative ClassificationA24F1/10
European ClassificationA24F1/10