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Publication numberUS2719769 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 4, 1955
Filing dateSep 4, 1952
Priority dateSep 4, 1952
Publication numberUS 2719769 A, US 2719769A, US-A-2719769, US2719769 A, US2719769A
InventorsOwen K Murphy
Original AssigneeOwen K Murphy
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Table type of motor operated kinesitherapy device
US 2719769 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

O. K MURPHY Oct. 4, 1955 f 2,719 TABLE TYPE OF MOTOR OPERATED KINES ITHERAPY DEV ICE z sheets-sheet 1 Filed Sept. 4. 1952 INVENTOR.

Oct. 4, 1955 0. K MURPHY 2,719,769

TABLE TYPE OF MOTOR OPERATED KINESITHERAPY DEVICE Filed Sept. 4, 1952 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 ATTORNEYS.

United States Patent TABLE TYPE OF MOTOR OPERATED KINESITHERAPY DEVICE Owen K. Murphy, Adamsville, Pa. Application September 4, 1952, Serial No. 307,759

6 Claims. (Cl. 311-7) This invention relates to a table type of motor operated kinesitherapy device and more particularly to a simple and durable device of this character having a supporting structure or stationary frame provided with an articulated self-positioning reclining deck by means of which the patient is brought into comfortable and beneficial postures, the articulated reclining deck also including one or more motor driven applicators having gyratory motion transmitted through the articulated deck to the person reclining thereon.

The invention is particularly directed to a table whose deck area or surface can be fixed in a single horizontal plane or in a plurality of planes inclined with respect to each other and to the horizontal so that the person undergoing treatment can stretch out fully in a prone or supine position or can recline in a position in which the leg portions of the body are bent in relation to the trunk of the body. In the articulated table of the present invention the several deck surfaces are so mounted with respect to each other that the weight of the body itself, and the distribution of this weight inherently adjust the several surfaces into those relative positions best suited to relieve the muscles from strain.

The present invention is also directed to a table'having an articulated deck the sections of which are gyrated by one or more motor operated applicators having gyratory motion so as to impart stimulating massaging action to the body of the user, and wherein the nature or character of this motion is gyratory as opposed to a jolting or shaking action.

One of the objects of the present invention is to provide such a motor operated table type of kinesitherapy device in which the motor driven applicator is not subject to undue wear, particularly in the bearings thereof.

Another object is to provide such a table type of kinesitherapy device which will operate without change in characteristics for a long period of time and which has both a pleasing and a therapeutic efiect.

Another object is to provide such a device which is composed of simple and low cost parts that can readily be assembled.

Another object is to provide such a device which is readily accessible for servicing or repairs.

Another object is to provide such a device which is entirely comfortable to sit or recline upon and at the same time effectively transmits deep gyratory motion to the body.

Another object is to provide such a device which is in the form of a pleasing and attractive piece of furniture and which harmonizes with the other furnishings of the room in which it is placed.

Another object of the invention is to provide such a device in which the individual effect of the gyrators used can be adjusted by severally adjusting the motor speeds thereof.

Another object of the invention is to provide such .a device which includes a timer which will stop the gyrator after the lapse of the time for which it has been set.

Another object of the present invention is to provide such a device in which the operating parts are substantially concealed and in which its functioning as a therapeutic device is not apparent to a casual observer.

Another particular object is to provide a simple and effective lock for releasably holding the articulated sections of the deck area in a common horizontal plane and which at the same time does not interfere with the gyratory action of the several sections.

Another particular object is to provide improved bearings and fulcrum points for the several sections which are long lived and do not interfere with the gyratory action of the several deck areas.

Another particular object of the present invention is to provide such a device having a finger guard to prevent the users fingers from becoming caught between the articulated deck sections and the supporting frame as the articulated deck sections move with shifts of the users body.

Another particular object is to provide cushioned wear members, in the form of woven fabric members, between the corners of the supporting structure and the corresponding deck sections.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description and drawings in which:

Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a table type motor operated kinesitherapy device embodying the present invention and shown with its several deck sections arranged in a common horizontal plane.

Fig. 2 is a vertical longitudinal section taken generally on line 2--2, Fig. 3 and showing the several deck sections arranged at angles with respect to one another.

Fig. 3 is a bottom plan view of the device with the parts positioned as shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is a wiring diagram of the electrical components.

Figs. 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 are enlarged fragmentary vertical sections taken generally on the correspondingly numbered lines of Fig. 3.

The supporting structure or stationary frame of the device, indicated generally at 15, includes four upright wooden legs 16 each of which rests upon a sponge rubber pad 18, these pads therefore forming soft resilient cushion elements for supporting the entire device. These legs are preferably of square form in cross section and the upper end of each includes an inwardly ofiset upward extension 19 forming an angular shoulder 20 on one part of which the front and rear main longitudinal side frame bars 21 and 22 rest. These longitudinal side frame bars 21 and 22 can be secured to the upward extensions 19 of the legs in any suitable manner, as by bolts 23. The supporting structure 15 also includes upper cross bars 24 which upper cross bars rest on the shoulders 20 of the legs and are suitably secured to the upward extensions 19 of these legs, as by bolts 25. Preferably wooden triangular bracing blocks 26 are secured to the inner faces of the longitudinal side frame bars 21, 22 and the cross bars 24 at the several corners thereof.

The supporting structure as above described provides a support for an articulated top or deck 27 which, as shown in Figs. 1 through 3, is composed of three sections designated at 28, 29 and 30. The end sections 28 and 30 preferably extend a short distance beyond the cross bars 24, while the overall length of the three sections is preferably such as to accommodate most persons disposed in a prone or supine position. considerably longer than the middle and foot sections 29 and 30, preferably about twice as long as each. The middle and foot sections 29 and 30 are about the same length. This division and proportion is principally to accommodate the head and trunk, thighs, and lower legs of the user of the three sections, particularly when The head end section 28 is brought to a position such as is illustrated in Fig. 2, and the actual dimensions are such as to adapt the table to persons of usual height. The several sections 28, 29 and 30 are similar in construction and hence the same reference numerals have been employed, the parts of the sections 29 and 30 being distinguished from those of the section 28 by the suffixes a and b, respectively.

Referring more particularly to the head section indicated generally at 28, this section, as with the other sections, is composed principally of a rectangular frame, indicated generally at 31, and a cushioned top, indicated generally at 32.

- The rectangular frame 31 comprises a pair of longitudinal or side bars 33 connected at their ends by cross bars 34 the spacing of the longitudinal side bars being such that the section 28 fits within the main longitudinal side bars 21, 22 of the supporting structure.

The cushioned top 32 comprises a rectangular wooden panel 35 which is covered by a pad or cushion 36 of sponge rubber or like soft, resilient, plastic material. This pad 36 and the edges of the panel 35 are covered by a flexible cover 38 of leather, fabric or other natural or synthetic flexible covering materials. The edges of the cover 38 are preferably folded down the sides of the sponge rubber pad 36 and wooden panel 35 and, except for the end extremity of the wooden panel, are preferably folded under and secured, as by tacks 39, to the underside of the wooden panel 35. At this end extremity of the wooden panel 35 a cross bar 40 is secured to its underside along its edge, as by nails 41. The rubber padding 36 and the cover 38 are continued along the outer and under face of this cross bar 49, as best shown in Fig. 9, and secured to the inner face of this cross bar 40, as by the tacks 39. At the opposite end of the head section 28, the longitudinal side bars 33 are of concave form, as indicated at 42.

The middle section 29 is of generally the same construction except, as previously indicated, that it is about half the length of the head section 28. Also each of the side bars 33a at one end is convexly rounded, as indicated at 43a, to fit into the recesses 42 in providing a nested swing joint between the sections 28 and 29. Since in other respects the parts of the middle section 29 are identical with those of the head section 28, the same reference numerals have been employed and distinguished by the suffix a.

The foot section 30 is of generally the same construction as the head section 28 except, as previously indicated, it is about half the length of the head section 28. Also its side rails 33b are convexly rounded, as indicated at 43b, to fit into the recesses 42a of the middle section 29 in the manner of nested swing joints as will be apparent from an inspection of the drawings. Since in other respects the construction of the foot section 30 is similar to the head section 28 the same reference numerals have been employed and distinguished by the sufiix b.

The several sections 28, 29 and 30 are hinged together at their meeting ends by hinges indicated generally at 45. Each of these hinges comprises an upper strip 46 of rubberized fabric, a lower strip 48 of rubberized fabric and a strip 49 of sponge rubber interposed between the strips 46, 48. In addition, to provide continuity of the covering material for the several sections across the hinge joint a strip 50 made of the same material as the covers 38, 38a, 38b of the several sections is arranged with its opposite edges interposed between each rubberized fabric strip 46 and the corresponding plywood panels and is arranged with its central part 51 in the form of an upstanding pleat interposed between the corresponding pair of sections. Each upper rubberized fabric strip is shown as secured along its edges to the undersides of the corresponding wooden panels by screws 52 which extend through the strip 50 of covering material and anchor in the corresponding wooden panels.

The lower rubberized fabric strip 48 of each hinge 45 is connected to the upper face of the corresponding pair of cross bars 34, 34a or 34a, 34b, as by bolts 53, as best illustrated in Figs. 5 and 6.

Each of the cushion tops 32, 32a, 32b is resiliently supported on its rectangular supporting frame 31, 31a, 31b and for this purpose each of these cushion tops is supported on a resilient block or cushion 55 which forms a soft, resilient cushion element. These soft, resilient cushion blocks 55 are interposed between the wooden panel 35 and the cross bars 34 of the desk section 28 and also between the wooden panels 35, 35a and those cross bars 34a and 34b which are remote from one another, as best shown in Fig. 3. One of these cushion blocks 55 is provided at each end of its supporting bar 34, 34a, 34b, and arranged directly thereunder and engaging the opposite or underside of these cross bars 34, 34a, 34b is a second similar resilient block or soft, resilient cushion element 56. Each pair of blocks 55, 56 can be set into the wooden panels 35, 35a, 35b and cross bars 34, 34a, 34b as best shown in Figs. 5 and 9, and each pair of these resilient blocks or cushion elements 55, 56 are held under compression by a bracket 58. Each of the brackets 58 is preferably in the form of a Z-shaped piece of metal having one leg 59 secured to the underside of the corresponding panel 35, 35a, 3512, as by screws 60, and as having another oppositely extending but parallel leg 61 extending under and engaging the underside of the corresponding block 56 to hold the blocks 55, 56 under compression at all times. The cushion blocks 55, 56 are preferably made of sponge rubber or the like.

It will be seen that with this arrangement each cushioned top 32, 32a and 32b has full cushioned support on the corresponding supporting frame 31, 31a, 31b and that hence motion from a motor driven gyratory applicator applied to any one of these cushioned tops 32, 32:: or 3212 will impart a gyratory movement thereto independent of the supporting frames 31, 31a and 31b therefor.

The middle deck section 29 is pivoted to the supporting structure by a pair of pivots indicated generally at 65. As best shown in Figs. 7 and 8 the pivot pin 66 of each of these pivots is in the form of a bolt extending through each of the main longitudinal side frame bars 21, 22 of the supporting structure and also through a U-shaped recess 68 in the underside of the corresponding side bar 33a of this middle deck section 29. This recess 68 is lined with a strip 69 of woven fabric, the ends of which extend along the underside of the corresponding side bar 33a and can be adhesively secured thereto.

In each lined recess 68 is arranged a steel sleeve 70 having force fitted therein a wooden sleeve 71. This wooden sleeve is concentrically bored to fit the carriage bolt 66 with which it has bearing engagement. A washer 72 is interposed between the metal sleeve 70 and the corresponding main longitudinal side frame bars 21, 22 and a similar washer 73 is interposed between the opposite end of each metal sleeve 70 and the nut of the carriage bolt 66.

A pad or double fold 74 of woven fabric is placed under each metal bearing sleeve 70 and under this pad 74 is arranged a strip 75 of fabric or the like the ends of which extend along the underside of the woven liner 69. The metal bearing sleeve 70 is held in compressive relation with the fabric strips 69, 74 and 75 as above described by a metal strap 76 which extends along the underside of the woven fabric strip 75 and can be secured to the corresponding side bar 31a by screws 78, these screws also extending through the ends of the fabric strips 69 and 75.

It has been found that with a bearing of this character the central part of each metal strap 76 is bowed so as to securely hold the metal sleeve '70 of each bearing in compressive relation with the woven fabric strips 69, 74 and 75 and that the bearing is secure, easy to move, cQ pletely free from noise, and will stand up under continued and high speed gyration of thecushioned tops 32, 32a and 32b of the several deck sections 28, 29 and 30.

The head section 28 rests on and swings about a pair of fulcrum blocks indicated generally at 80. Each of these fulcrum blocks is in the form of a wooden block suitably secured to the inner face of the corresponding main longitudinal side beam 21, 22 of the supporting structure and projecting under the corresponding side bar 33 of the deck section 28. The upper side of each block 80 is preferably rounded to facilitate rocking of the supporting frame 31 of the head section 28 thereon and this block is preferably faced with a strip 81 which can be secured to the block in any suitable manner. It has been found that with the fabric hinges 45 and lined bearings 65 as above described and with the fabric facings 81, the head section 28 is free from any sliding movement on its supporting blocks 80.

A pair of stop blocks 82 are provided to limit the folding or out of coplanar movement of the several deck sections 28, 29 and 30 to the position illustrated in Fig. 2. These stop blocks are each secured to the corresponding main longitudinal side bar 21, 22 of the supporting structure near the center thereof and in position to engage the underside of the corresponding end of the side bars 33:: of the middle deck section 29. Each of these stop blocks 82 can be provided with a facing 83 of soft, resilient cushion material, such as sponge rubber.

When the several articulated deck sections 28, 29 and 30 are in a horizontal position, as illustrated in Fig. 1, the supporting frames 31, 31b of these deck sections rest upon strips 84 of woven fabric which are secured to the upper faces of the triangular blocks 26 of the supporting structure and can have their ends secured to the longitudinal side bars 21, 22 and cross bars 24, as best illustrated in Fig. 2.

A feature of the invention resides in the provision of a releasable latch for holding the several deck sections 28, 29 and 30 in this horizontal position so that the apparatus can be used as a table having a firmly held flat cushioned top 27 subjected to gyratory movement.

As best shown in Figs. 3 and .11 this latch is secured to the cross bar 24 at the head end of the supporting structure 15 and includes a block 85, preferably of a hard plastic, secured to this cross bar 24 and having a horizontal guideway 86 bored therethrough to extend parallel with the cross bar 24. In this guideway is arranged the reduced end 88 of a rod 88 having a knob 90 at its outboard end, and which knob is arranged at the side of the table. is slidingly fitted in a rubber grommet 91 which rubber grommet is embraced by the eye of a screw eye 92, the shank of this screw eye being secured into the cross bar 24.

The reduced end 88 of this rod 89 is slidingly fitted in a rubber bushing 93 and which preferably has an enlarged head 94 interposed between the face of the block 85 and the shoulder provided in the rod 89 by its reduced end 88. The end extremity of the reduced part 88 of the rod 89 has fixed thereto acylindrical head 95 which slides in the guideway 86 and has a protruding rounded end. This protruding rounded end fits into a rounding notch or recess 96 provided in a catch 93. This catch is preferably made in the form of a block of hard plastic and is secured to depend from the adjacent cross bar 34 of the supporting frame 31 by an L-shaped bracket 99 and screws 100. The leading end of the catch 98 is preferably rounded, as indicated at 161, so that when this catch swings downwardly and into engagement with the rounding head 95 on the rod 89 it will automatically move this head out of the way to subsequently snap into the recess 96. This automatic movement of the head 95 of the rod 89 into the recess 95 is insured by a helical compression spring 102.

The cushioned tops 32, 32a of the head and interme- This outboard end of the rod 89 I diate sections 28 and 29 are gyrated by individual motor driven applicators secured to the undersides of their wooden panels 35, 35a. As best shown in Fig. 10, these applicators each have an electric motor 106 including a generally cylindrical casing 108 and a motor shaft 109. A fan 110 is mounted on each end of the motor shaft 109, the bades 111 of this fan being shaped to move air longitudinally through the casing 108 of the electric motor for the purpose of cooling the same. The fan includes a hub 112 from which the blades 111 radiate, and screwed into each fan hub 112 is a screw 113 which projects radially and has a head 114 at its outer end. One or more weights 115 are carried by the screw 113, these weights being preferably of-the washer-like form and held against the screw head 114 by a lock nut 116. Each screw 113 and its weights 115 provide an eccentric weight on the motor shaft 109 which tends to gyrate the motor shaft and the motor as a function of its operation.

A pair of rubber rings 118 surrounds each of the opposite ends of the motor casing 108. These rings are preferably cementitiously securedto the motor casing to provide soft, resilient, radial cushioning extensions of the motor casing.

For the purpose of securing the motor 106 as above described, a flexible strap 119 of rubberized material is secured to the underside of each of the wooden panels 35, 35a. These straps extend lengthwise of the apparatus and the ends of each are secured, as by transverse rows of screws 120, to the underside of each panel as best shown in Figs. 3 and 10.

A flat rectangular pad 121 of sponge rubber or the like is interposed between the central part of this strap 119 and the underside of the corresponding wooden panel 35 or 35a. This sponge rubber pad 121 is preferably cementitiously secured to the strap 119 and is held by the strap under compression against the underside of the corresponding wooden panel 35, 35a.

A wooden block 123 is arranged against the underside of each of the straps 119. The underside of each wooden block is provided with a semi-circular central recess 124 which compressively receives the rubber rings 118 surrounding the motor casing 108. A vertical tie bolt 126 extends downwardly through each end of each wooden block 123 and through the corresponding end of each strap 119, each of these bolts having a head 128 embedded in the sponge rubber pad 121 and bearing against the upper face of the flexible strap 119. The lower ends of these tie bolts extend through the ends of a metal plate-129. These tie bolts 126 preferably extend through rubber grommets 130 provided in holes 131 in the plate 129 and each grommet 130 is supported by a washer 132, lock washer 133 and nut 134 at the lower end of each of the tie bolts 126. The central part 135 of the metal plate 129 is curved to conform to the undersides of the rubber rings 118 which embrace the motor housing 108 and the nuts 134 are tightened to hold these rubber rings under compressive relation with the motor casing 108 and the block 123 and plate 129.

Each motor 106, for its protection, is contained with in a cup-like shell 136. This shell is preferably made of metal and has an outwardly extending flange 138 at its rim which is shown as secured by bolts 139 to the opposite ends of the corresponding wooden block .123. This shell is preferably provided with vent openings 140 through which air, drawn by the fans 110, is moved for cooling the motors.

Particularly as to each motor 106 and its mounting on the underside of its wooden panel 35, it will be noted that this mounting includes the wooden block 123 and motor holding member or plate 129 which are provided with opposing recesses; that a motor is disposed between these parts in fully spaced relation to the walls of said recesses; and that this motor has a relatively stationary part and a rotary part and that the rotary part has a predetermined mechanical rotary unbalance of substantial amount well in excess of any accidental unbalance due to inaccuracy in manufacture. It will further be noted that in this motor mounting a plurality of soft, resilient cushion rings 118 are provided in axially spaced relation around the stationary part of the motor and are interposed under stress between the stationary part and the recess walls to serve as the sole and floating support between the motor and the block 123 and plate 129 whereby rotation of the unbalanced rotary part of the rotor will cause a gyratory bodily movement of the motor in a relatively small, closed-loop path which is transmitted through the block 123, strap 119 and pad 121 to the corresponding cushioned top' 32, 32a.

A feature of the invention resides in the provision of a finger guard, indicated generally at 141, to prevent in jury to the fingers of a user. In the action of the table the several articulated sections 28, 29 and 30 are self adjusting to adapt themselves in position to the body of the user. Accordingly when the user shifts his weight the several articulated sections assume different angular positions to accommodate the new position of the body of the user. If, particularly during such shift of a users body, the user should happen to have his fingers over the main longitudinal side bars 21 or 22 and under the elevated ends of either of the articulated sections 29 or 30, it will be seen that the lowering of these elevated ends of these particular sections could pinch the users fingers.

To avoid this each guard 141 is in the form of a vertical metal plate 142 arranged inside and closely adjacent the corresponding longitudinal side bar 21, 22 of the supporting structure 15. This guard plate has one flanged angularly disposed edge 143 secured by bolts 144 to the corresponding longitudinal side bar 33b of the supporting frame 31b. Each plate 142 projects under the longitudinal side bar 33a of the supporting frame 31a and its upper edge 145 is preferably flanged and inclined so as to generally fit the undersides of the companion bar 33a when the several supporting frames 31, 31a, 31b are in the maximum inclined positions shown in Fig. 2.

It will be seen that these guards 141 effectively provide a movable barrier and prevent the users fingers from becoming pinched between the raised parts of the frames 31a, 31b if, in shifting his position, these frames should be moved downwardly.

The electrical circuit for the motors 106 includes a mas ter rheostat 150 and also includes a timer 151 and two additional rheostats 152, 153, as well as a pair of manual switches 154, 155, the timer, rheostats 152, 153 and switches 154, 155 being mounted on a control panel 156 which is in turn secured to the longitudinal side frame bar 21 of the supporting structure 15.

As shown in the wiring diagram, Fig. 4, the timer 151 and master rheostat 150 are arranged directly in the sides of the power line 158 and the rheostats 152 and 153 together with the switches 154, 155 are arranged in branch lines 159 and 168 severally connecting with the motors 106, each motor, its rheostat and its switch being arranged in parallel with the other motor and its rheostat and switch. The rheostat 150 is preferably secured to the inner face of one of the corner blocks 26 of the supporting structure 15, and is adjusted as a part of the manufacture of the table. The other two rheostats 152, 153, as well as the timer 151 and the switches 154, 155 have knobs protruding from the control panel 156 by which the timer can be set for any desired duration of treatment and each of the motors 106 individually set to any desired speed and hence to produce any desired degree of activity of its eccentric weight 115.

The interior of the space defined by the side bars 21, 22 and end bars 24 of the supporting structure can be enclosed by a piece of cloth 161 tacked to the undersides of these bars.

In the operation of the therapeutic table it will be seen that the pivots 65 are coaxially alined with each other no additional mechanical devices.

at a location which is to the left of the vertical midplane of the middle section 29 as viewed in Figs. 1, 2 and 3. It will further be noted that when the articulated sections 28, 29 and 30 are in the same plane, as shown in Figs. 1 and 3, the points of support for the articulated top on the supporting structure 15 are the fabric strips 84 on the end cross bars 24, which respectively contact the side rails 33, 33b of the end sections 28 and 30, and the pivots which sustain the middle section 29. The sections 28, 29 and 30 are also supported as among each other by their connecting hinges 45.

It will therefore be apparent that, if a downward force is exerted along the line of the hinges 45 connecting the head section 28 with the middle section 29, all of the sections will move from a horizontally alined toward the mutually inclined position shown in Fig. 2. Such action will cause a sliding movement of the foot section 30 over the fabric straps 84 on the adjacent cross bar 24, and establish a fulcrum point on these fabric strips. Limitation of total displacement is attained by means of the stop blocks 82, located on the lower inner faces of the longitudinal side bars 21, 22 at a position to engage the head ends of the side rails 33a of the middle section 29. A fulcrum point for the head section 28 is also created by the pair of fulcrum blocks 80, also secured to the inner faces of the longitudinal bars 21, 22 and arranged to abut the edges of the longitudinal bars 33 of the head section 28 slightly to the right of center of these rails as viewed in Fig. 2.

The moment of the left hand portion of the head section 28, as viewed in Figs. 1 and 2, with respect to the fulcrum blocks as pivot points is greater than the moment of its light hand portion and therefore the head section 28 tends to restore itself to a horizontal position. Similarly the moment of the foot section 30 with respect to its supporting cross bar 24 impels that section to return to the horizontal, and these combined moments impose a couple on the middle section 29 tending to restore it to its horizontal plane. Hence, when forces or loads applied on the table are not concentrated or made stronger on the left hand portion of the middle section 28, the table assumes the horizontal position shown in Figs. 1 and 3. This construction and arrangement of pivot points make it unnecessary to operate the sections by means of gears or the like and also renders the articulated deck self-adjusting to conform to the position of a person lying thereon.

Thus, when a person lies face down on the table, as is desirable for certain treatments, the articulated table top is flat or horizontal. On the other hand, when lying on the back, the sections normally assume an inclined relation to each other, this relation depending upon the position assumed and the distribution of the body weight. Such inclination is effected automatically, and requires In the table shown in the scale of the drawings, the offsetting of the fulcrum points from a vertical transverse plane from the centers of the gravity of the fulcrumed sections has been made such as to cause the sections to move relative to each other, and in each direction, free and smoothly and without jar.

The head and middle deck sections 28, 29 of the table are each provided with a motor driven gyratory applicator so formed as to develop a periodic gyratory motion in the several cushioned tops 32, 32a, 32b and which motion is transmitted to the body of the occupant. For this purpose, as best shown in Figs. 2, 3 and 10, each of the wooden panels 35, 35a of the deck sections 28 and 29 is equipped on its underside with a small electric motor 106 whose projecting shaft has eccentric weights 115.

Each motor is individually operated by current flowing from the supply lines 158 (Fig. 4) through a master rheostat and timer 151. As further shown in this figure the two motors 106 are arranged. in parallel andin branch lines each of which has an individual rheostat 152, 153 as well as a switch 154, 155. These rheostats 152, 153 and switches 154, 155-are conveniently manually adjustable from the control panel '156 so that the speed of each of the motors 106, as well as their energization can be manually controlled. Also the timer1 51 can conveniently be set from the same control panel 156.

In the shifting of ones weight on the angularly disposed deck sections 28, 29 and 30, as illustrated in Fig. 2, the middle and foot sections 29, 30 move vertically toward and from the supporting structure 15. In the downward movement there is danger of the occupants fingers becoming caught between the side bars 21, 22 of the supporting structure 15 and the side bars 33a or 33b of the middle and foot deck sections 29 and 30. To avoid this finger guards 141 are secured to the side bars 33b of the foot section 30 so as to, in effect, blank off the space between the foot section 30 and the corresponding longitudinal side bars 21, 22 of the supporting structure, these finger guards 141 also extending under the middle section 29 so as to blank off the space under this section and prevent such injury to the users fingers.

It will also be seen that by the provision of the manually releasable latch at the head end of the table the several articulated deck sections 28, 29 and 30 are positively maintained in a horizontal position regardless of the disposition of the weight placed upon the deck. It will further be seen that this latch does not interfere with the gyratory movement of the top sections of the deck. Accordingly, with this latch, the table is capable of being used as a table having a fixed flat horizontal cushioned top subject to oscillatory movements.

It also has been found that with the specific form of the bearings 65, these bearings are cushioned so as to be noiseless and not in any way impede the proper oscillation of the cushioned tops of the several sections and atthe same time provide a bearing which is smooth and noiseless in its action. The end straps 84 have also been found to avoid wear and noise when serving both as fulcrum points and as supports for the head and foot sections 28 and 30 and also to render the table entirely noiseless in its action.

I claim:

1. A table type of therapeutic device, comprising a relatively stationary frame having upright legs and upper horizontal spaced side and end bars extending therebetween, an articulated deck for said supporting structure comprising a plurality of sections hinged together along adjacent horizontal ends, horizontal, coaxial pivots between said side bars and one of said sections to provide a relatively fixed fulcrum about which said one of said sections can oscillate, a fulcrum and supporting means on said side bars about which other sections of the deck can oscillate in a vertical direction and whereby the adjacent ends of two of said deck sections can be elevated above said side bars, and a guard preventing the users fingers from becoming caught between said side bars and said adjacent ends of said two of said deck sections, comprising a vertical guard plate secured to and depending from one of said adjacent ends of said two of said deck sections adjacent the inner face of each of said side bars, each plate projecting beyond the deck section to which it is secured and under the other of said two of said deck sections.

2. A table type of therapeutic device, comprising a relatively stationary frame having upright legs and upper horizontal spaced side and end bars extending therebetween, an articulated deck for said supporting structure comprising a plurality of cushioned tops hinged together along adjacent horizontal ends, a supporting frame for each of said cushioned tops, and resilient means arranged to support each of said cushioned tops on its supporting frame, horizontal coaxial pivots between said side bars and one of said supporting frames to provide a relatively fixed fulcrum about which said one of said supporting frames can -oscillate, a fulcrum and supporting means oneach'ofsaid :side bars about which other'of said supporting frames can oscillate in a vertical direction to assume different vertical angles with respect to each other and to said one of said supporting frames and whereby theadjacentends of two of said supporting frames can beelevated abovesaid side bars and a guard preventing the users fingers from becomingcaught between'said side bars and said adjacent ends of two of said supporting frames, comprising a vertical guard plate secured to and depending from one of said adjacent ends of two of said supporting frames adjacent the inner face of each of said side bars, each plate projecting beyond the supporting frame to which it is attached and under the other of said two of said supporting frames.

3. A table type of therapeutic device, comprising a relatively stationary frame having upright legs, upper horizontal longitudinal bars and end bars extending therebetween, an articulated deck for said supporting structure comprising a plurality of cushioned tops hinged together along adjacent ends, a supporting frame for each of said cushioned tops and having longitudinal bars connected by cross bars with said longitudinal bars of said supporting frames severally arranged parallel with and adjacent the inner faces of said longitudinal bars of said stationary frame, and resilient means arranged to support each of said cushioned tops on its supporting frame, one of said longitudinal bars at each side of the device being provided with an upwardly extending recess in its underside and said recesses being in alinement transversely of the device, a woven fabric lining in each of said recesses, a metal sleeve in each of said lined recesses, a wooden sleeve tightly fitted in each of said metal sleeves, resilient means engaging each of said metal sleeves and retaining each metal sleeve in compressive relation with the lining of its recess, a pivot pin fixed to the adjacent companion horizontal bar and journalled coaxially in said wooden sleeve to provide a relatively fixed fulcrum about which said one of said supporting frames can oscillate, and a fulcrum and supporting means on each of said longitudinal bars of said stationary frame about which other of said supporting frames can oscillate in a ver tical direction to assume different vertical angles with respect to each other and to said one of said supporting frames.

4. A structure as set forth in claim 3 wherein said resilient means engaging each of said metal sleeves comprises a metal strap extending across the corresponding recess and secured at its opposite ends to the underside of the longitudinal bar in which said recess is formed.

5. A structure as set forth in claim 3 wherein said resilient means engaging each of said metal sleeves comprises a length of woven fabric extending across the corresponding recess and a metal strap extending along the underside of said length of woven fabric and secured at its opposite ends to the underside of the longitudinal bar in which said recess is formed.

6. A table type of therapeutic device, comprising a rigid supporting structure including upright corner legs, upper longitudinal and end bars extending generally horizontally between said corner legs in rectangular arrangement, triangular corner blocks secured to the opposing faces of said bars at the corners thereof and woven fabric members severally secured to the upper faces of said corner blocks, a plurality of cushioned tops hinged together along adjacent horizontal ends, resilient means supporting each of said cushioned tops on said supporting frame, horizontal coaxial pivots between said supporting structure and one of said supporting frames to provide a relatively fixed fulcrum about which said one of said supporting frames can oscillate, said supporting structure further providing a fulcrum about which other of said supporting frames can oscillate in a vertical direction to assume different vertical angles with respect to each other and'to said one of said supporting frames, said woven fabric members being arranged in the line of m0vement of the endmost of said supporting frames, and means between said supporting structure and any one of said supporting frames and arranged to releasably latch said last frame against vertical movement thereby to hold all of said supporting frames in substantially fixed position with reference to each other.

Refeie'n'ces'Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Hampton Sept. 9, Wettlaufer Aug. 31, Black July 5, Nimmo Dec. 23, Miller Aug. 31,

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Classifications
U.S. Classification5/618, 601/60, 601/54, 5/915, 601/92
International ClassificationA61H23/02, A61H1/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S5/915, A61H2023/0272, A61H2201/0142