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Publication numberUS2720056 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 11, 1955
Filing dateJan 4, 1951
Priority dateJan 4, 1951
Publication numberUS 2720056 A, US 2720056A, US-A-2720056, US2720056 A, US2720056A
InventorsAlbert H Levy
Original AssigneeAlbert H Levy
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Combined lamp and flower receptacle
US 2720056 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 11, 1955 A. H. LEVY COMBINED LAMP AND FLOWER RECEPTACLE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 4, 1951 INVENTQR ALBERT H.LEVY BY WWW/( ATTORNEY Oct. 11, 1955 A. H. LEVY COMBINED LAMP AND FLOWER RECEPTACLE Filed Jan. 4, 195] 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.

ALBERT H. LEVY BY%W+ Km ATTORNEY United States Patent A COMBINED LAMP AND FLOWER RECEPTACLE Albert H. Levy, Chicago, Ill.

ApplicationJauuary45 1951, Serial No. 204,350

3 Claims. (Cl. 47-41) i My invention relates to lamps and, moreparticularly, to lamps of the type embodying means for supporting natural or artificial plants and the like.

One of the objects of my invention is the provision of a lamp of the character set forth. havinga plurality of receptacles for containing plants, natural or artificial, the said receptaclesbeing so arranged relative to the light source that highly desirable and interesting decorative effects are obtained.

Anotherobject of my invention is the provision of a lamp of the foregoing character which has a high degree of ornamental and .decorative value, which is simple in construction, economical to manufacture and durable in r service.

Other and further objects and advantages of my invention will become apparent from the following descrip tion when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

Fig. lis a side elevational view of one embodiment of my invention with certain parts shown=in cross-section.

Fig. 2 is a vertical cross-sectional view partly inelevation of another embodiment of my invention.

Fig. 3 is a side elevational view partly in cross section of another modified embodiment of my invention.

Fig, 4 is a fragmentary elevational view of the same,

. and

shown as having substantially rectangular cutouts, it is.

to be understood that the perforate portions may have any desired cutout or filigree effect. Disposed in alinement and in concentric relation with each of the imperforate portions 13 is a bowl-shaped receptacle indicated generally by the numeral 16, the height of the said receptacles extending substantially the full height of the imperforate portion 13, as illustrated in Fig. l. The receptacles 16 each have a central opening in the bottom and are connected to the imperforate portions 13 of the column so that the bottoms of the receptacles are in sealing engagement therewith. Thus, a watertight annularly formed receptacle is provided for the reception of soil, moss or any other suitable planting medium. As will be apparent by reference to Fig. l, the receptacles 16 are in tiered coaxial relationship, with the uppermost receptacle being the smallest in diameter and the lowermost being the largest in diameter. It is to be understood. however, that all receptacles may be of the same size or may vary in size.

A conventional lamp socket 17 is contained within the 70 upper portion of the tubular column 12, the said socket 2,720,056 Patented Oct. 11, 1955 beingusuitably insulated from the walls of the tubular column by an insulating sleeve 18. The socket 17is connected to electrical conductors 9 in circuit with a switch21. The socket 17 is intended to receive the screw plug .base of a conventional incandescent lamp .22 of the elongated type, the lamp being of such length .as to extend substantially the length of the tubular column .12.

The .end 23 of the bracket 10 is tu'bularin form and preferably is split longitudinally so that the upper end of the tubular column12 may be inserted and clamped therein in a: well. known manner. The upper end of the tubular column 12 may be suitably threaded to receive a plug 24 on which is secured a receptacle26 substantially similar in shape to the receptacles 16 having a bottom. formed integrally therewith.

In the modified embodiment illustrated in Fig. 2, my invention is :shown in the form of avfloor model withthe source of illumination being a fluorescent tubular lamp 25 instead of an incandescent lamp. In this embodiment a tubular column 27 comprising alternate perforate -.and imperforate sections 28 and 29 respectively, is received in a bayonet socket 31 suitably mounted on a base 32 adapted to rest on r a floor surface. A conventional fluorescent tube socket 33 is housed within the lower end of the column and is in electrical connection with elec trical conductors 34. A corresponding fluorescent tube socket 36 is housed in the upper end of the tubular column 27 and the terminals thereof are: in electrical connection with electrical conductors 37. Extending longitudinally of the tubular column is a conduit 38 to house the electrical conductors. Suitably mounted on: the tubular column in alinement with each of the imperforate portions and concentric therewith is a bowl-shaped receptacle indicated generally by 39, each of the receptacles having a central aperturein the bottom. and being in sealing engagement with the tubular column 27 so as .to provide a. watertight annularlyformed receptacle, adapted to contain planting medium such as soil moss or the like. The lowermost receptacle 41 is somewhat diiferentlycohstructedwfrom. the intermediate receptacles 39,. the said lowermost receptacle having a re-entrant :portion .42. at thebottom thereof extending upwardlyinto the receptacle and With themarginal edges thereof beingin sealing engagement with the column 27. This construction providesclearance foraccommodating the bayonet socket 31 and .alsoserves to hide the same from view so as to enhance the general appearance of the lamp structure. The tubular column .27 at the top thereof may beprovided with suitable internal threads to receive a plug 43 on which is supported a bowl-shaped receptacle 44.- As will be apparent by reference to Fig. 2, all of.the 91'6- ceptacles are similar in general shape and increase progressively in diameter from the uppermost to the lowermost receptacle. It .is to be understood, however, 1 that the receptacles may be identical or vary in size. The necessary electrical ballast for operating the fluorescent lamp may be contained within the base 32 or may be of the type adapted for plugging into a wall socket.

The receptacles 16, 39, 41 and 44 are all intended to be filled with soil or other planting medium and planted with either natural or artificial plants of any suitable variety.

When the lamps 22 and 25 are energized, the light therefrom passes through the perforated portions such as 14, and the light rays falling on the plants provide very interesting and decorative effects. It will also be apparent that if the outer surfaces of the receptacles are reflective in character that light rays from the lamps will be reflected from the said surfaces and will be directed downwardly to further enhance the illumination provided by the light source.

In the modified embodiment illustrated in Figs. 3 and 4, my invention is shown as a wall type structure and comprises a backing panel member 46 having a series of perforations to receive screws 47 for attaching the panel to a wall surface. Punched out of the backing member 46 are a series of pairs of slots 48 with the areas immediately therebelow struck out of the plane of the said member to provide shoulders 49 and clearance for accommodating the hooking elements 51 of the plant receptacles 52, hereinafter to be described. Struck out from the plane of the backing member proximate to the ends thereof are two lugs 53 and 54 which are bent at a right angle to the plane of the backing member and serve as brackets for supporting lamp bulb sockets 56 which are arranged in opposed relation to each other. As will be apparent by reference to Fig. 3, electrical conducting wires 58 pass through the openings 59 in the backing member formed by striking out of the lugs 53 and 54 and connect with the sockets 56 in electrical connection with a switch 60. Each of the said sockets is intended to receive an incandescent lamp 59 of the elongated type, the lamps preferably being of such length as to provide some clearance between the ends thereof when the same are installed in the sockets so as to facilitate removal and insertion of either of the said lamps.

Arranged in tiered relation and supported on the shoulders 49 provided adjacent each of the slots 48 are a plurality of receptacles 52 which are shaped substantially as shown in the drawings. The receptacles may be in the form substantially as shown, each including an outer bowed wall 61 and a straight rear wall 62, the latter being outwardly bowed substantially medially as at 63 to provide clearance for accommodating a lamp 59 as illustrated in Fig. 5. Thus the receptacles, when viewed from the top, are each substantially semi-annular in form. It will be understood, however, that the receptacles 52 may be in any suitable form or configuration. Attached to each of the receptacles 52 is a pair of clips or hooking elements 51 which are adapted to be received in the slots 48 on the backing member and to engage with the shoulders 49 provided thereon to support the receptacle on the backing member, in the manner illustrated in Fig. 3.

As will be apparent, the receptacles 52 are supported in vertical alinement with the lighting elements 59 disposed substantially in the center, as seen in Fig. 4, and each is intended to be filled with soil or other planting medium and planted with either natural or artificial plants. When the lamps 59 are energized, the light emanating from the exposed portions of the said lamps will illuminate the plants. Additionally, if the outer surfaces of the receptacles 52 and backing member 46 are reflective, additional interesting lighting eifects are obtained. It is to be understood that the receptacles may be all of the same size or may vary, increasing or decreasing progressively in size from the top to the bottom, and that the several embodiments illustrated may be adapted for either incandescent or fluorescent lamps.

I claim:

1. In a structure of the character described comprising a single unitary tubular column having imperforate portions and intermediate perforate portions, a plurality of bowl shaped receptacles spacedly secured on said column to said imperforate portions in alinement and in concentric relation with each of the imperforate portions and in water tight engagement with said imperforate portions to support soil, moss or other suitable planting medium, the outer rim of said bowl receptacles extending above the juncture of said bowl receptacles and said imperforate portions and an elongated light source supported in said column and visible through said perforate portions in straight lines at right angles to said light source.

2. In a structure of the character described comprising a single unitary tubular column having imperforate portions and intermediate perforate portions, a plurality of bowl shaped receptacles spacedly supported on said column in alinement and in concentric relation with the im perforate portions and in water tight engagement with said imperforate portions to support soil, moss or other suitable planting medium, with the uppermost of said receptacles being the smallest in diameter and the lowermost the largest in diameter, each said receptacle having its entire base supporting surface below the outer rim of said receptacle and an elongated light source supported in said column and visible through said perforate portions in straight lines at right angles to said light source.

3. In a structure of the character described comprising an upright single unitary hollow column having spaced openings for passage of light from a light source, a plurality of bowl shaped receptacles spacedly supported on said column intermediate said spaced openings and in water tight engagement with said column to support soil, moss or other suitable planting medium, the outer wall of the bowl shaped receptacles each extending above the base of said receptacles so that said base is invisible when viewed in straight lines at right angles to said light source and an elongated light source supported in said column and visible through said spaced openings in straight lines at right angles to said light source.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS D. 128,958 Dreyfuss Aug. 19, 1941 70,316 Bigelow Oct. 28, 1867 585,486 Snow June 29, 1897 1,263,391 Eickemeyer Apr. 23, 1918 1,492,758 Silberhartz May 6, 1924 1,497,825 Zahl June 17, 1924 1,499,473 Price July 1, 1924 1,758,130 Shoemaker May 13, 1930 2,060,005 Fletcher et al. Nov. 10, 1936 2,152,869 Campbell Apr. 4, 1939 2,166,149 Hohl July 18, 1939 FOREIGN PATENTS 468,032 Germany Mar. 5, 1930

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US70316 *Oct 29, 1867 Improved vase for holding flowers
US585486 *Mar 27, 1897Jun 29, 1897 Combined vase and flag-holder
US1263391 *Mar 3, 1916Apr 23, 1918Rudolf EickemeyerOrnamental aquarium.
US1492758 *Apr 6, 1923May 6, 1924Metropolitan Art Glass Co IncFlower and fruit stand
US1497825 *Aug 7, 1922Jun 17, 1924Hjalmar ZahlDisplay receptacle
US1499473 *Dec 21, 1920Jul 1, 1924David PriceFlower box
US1758130 *Feb 15, 1928May 13, 1930William D ShoemakerOrnamental wall fixture
US2060005 *Mar 16, 1935Nov 10, 1936Fletcher William ArthurCombined light and flower holder
US2152869 *May 26, 1937Apr 4, 1939Campbell Harry VFlower holder
US2166149 *Sep 2, 1936Jul 18, 1939Hohl Russell LIlluminating device
USD128958 *Sep 16, 1940Aug 19, 1941 Design for an illtjminated display stand
DE468032C *Sep 28, 1927Mar 5, 1930Ludwig SimonBlumenstaender
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3455055 *Dec 9, 1966Jul 15, 1969Chute Challoner RPlant receptacle
US4232362 *Oct 5, 1978Nov 4, 1980Lam, Inc.Family of modular lamps for indirect lighting
US4349864 *Mar 2, 1981Sep 14, 1982Smith Phillip HLighted plant stand
US5450692 *Jul 30, 1993Sep 19, 1995Ruibal; Michael A.Elevated plant holder
US5577344 *Apr 22, 1994Nov 26, 1996Zaremba; George J.Party riser
US5600909 *May 19, 1995Feb 11, 1997Hooper; Steve A.Illuminated changeable message display
US5606824 *Sep 18, 1995Mar 4, 1997Ruibal; Michael A.Elevated plant holder
US5669185 *Feb 20, 1996Sep 23, 1997Proulx; Karen A.Shutter for buildings
US5755343 *Oct 31, 1996May 26, 1998Louis Harvey, Sr.Wall shelf with integral article receptical
US5879071 *Feb 27, 1997Mar 9, 1999Sanford, Jr.; Sammie J.Lighted planter
US6202349 *Feb 10, 1999Mar 20, 2001Sadao KanagawaWinding device, and a vessel incorporating advantages of a flower-arranging vase, a flower-pot, and an artificial-flower basket
US6513284 *Feb 9, 2000Feb 4, 2003Delbert E. SandlinDisplay post with selectable multi-function capability
US6539665Nov 15, 2000Apr 1, 2003Marcos LlonaPlanter having a vertical rabbet for conformally engaging an upright elongate member
US20120187136 *Jan 25, 2011Jul 26, 2012Larry SmithSegmented refreshment holder
Classifications
U.S. Classification47/41.1, 47/66.6, 362/253, 362/122, D26/55
International ClassificationA47G7/04, F21V33/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47G7/044, F21V33/00
European ClassificationF21V33/00, A47G7/04D