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Publication numberUS2721689 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 25, 1955
Filing dateDec 6, 1952
Priority dateDec 6, 1952
Publication numberUS 2721689 A, US 2721689A, US-A-2721689, US2721689 A, US2721689A
InventorsWilliam T Nye
Original AssigneeGaylord Container Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Yarn cone holder
US 2721689 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 25, w NYE YARN CONE HOLDER Filed Dec. 6, 1952 Mrs 71912:

M44 MM [/1045 EM M M United States Patent YARN CONE HOLDER William T. Nye, Richmond Heights, Mo., assignor to Gaylord Container Corporation, St. Louis, Mo., a corporation of Maryland Application December 6, 1952, Serial No. 324,454

3 Claims. (Cl. 229-40) This invention appertains to wound yarn cone holders constructed of solid fibreboard, corrugated fibreboard, or any other suitable material.

As filament yarns, such as rayon, nylon, and the like, are manufactured they are wound upon relatively slender tapered spindles. The yarn spindles are in the form of hollow frustrums of cones. The yarn filament is wound so that a substantial portion of the spindle extends above the level of the yarn. This portion is termed the button. A relatively short portion of the spindle extends below the level of the wound yarn to form the base. After the yarn is wound on the spindles, each cone is individually wrapped. It has been found expedient in the industry to ship a large number of wound yarn cones in a single container. In order to minimize damage it is very important to eliminate all movement of the cones Within the master shipping container, so the cones are packed in sturdy cartons or holders. For economy, from two to four wound yarn cones are often packed in one cone holder.

In most instances, the yarn cones are packed within the holders so that the button of the spindle as well as the base extends through spaced, die-cut openings in the top and bottom panels of the holders. The spindle fits snugly in the die-cut openings so as to obviate any motion or movement of the cones Within the holder thus preventing injury to the delicate yarn fibres. Further offort has been made to prevent any motion between adjacent cone holders by placing the holders into the master container in horizontal layers so that the button of each spindle extends upwardly into the hollow center of the base of the spindle above. Even under the most favorable conditions, due to the clearance between the outside of the button and the inside of the base of the spindle, there is generally considerable movement between adjacent layers of cone holders. It is therefore an object of this invention to provide a yarn cone holder having integral, interlocking means to prevent any movement between adjacent horizontal layers of holders within a master container.

It is a further object of this invention to provide yarn cone holders having upwardly disposed extensions which provide convenient grasping tabs to facilitate the handling, loading, and proper placement of the holder within the relatively deep master container.

Another object of this invention is to provide a cone holder which will efiectively aiford interlocking engagement between adjacent horizontal layers of cone holders within the master container regardless of whether the holders in adjacent horizontal layers are positioned in parallel or right angular relation to one and another.

A still further object is to provide a cone holder which may be made from a rectangular blank of material, thereby substantially eliminating all waste.

Still another object of thisinvention is to provide a yarncone holder'having integral, interlocking extensions which are automatically erected into operating position when the holder is set up ready for use.

These and other objects will be apparent to those skilled ICC in the art upon a complete and full understanding of this invention.

This invention comprises a yarn cone holder having upwardly disposed projections extending from the side walls of the holder and spaced openings in the bottom portion of the holder adapted to snugly receive the upwardly disposed projections of a subjacent holder.

In the drawings which accompany this specification like symbols refer to like parts wherever they occur.

Fig. 1 is a plan view of a blank of a cone holder embodying a preferred form of this invention.

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of a yarn cone holder erected from the blank shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a top perspective view of four yarn cone holders embodying a preferred form of this invention shown arranged in a horizontal layer adapted to be placed within a master shipping container.

Fig. 4 is a perspective view of the horizontal layer of cone holders illustrated in Fig. 3 with two holders of a second layer shown placed in interlocked position.

Fig. 5 is a perspective view of a horizontal layer of cone holders arranged in still another manner.

The blank illustrated in Fig. 1 is provided with an outer top forming flap 11 and an inner top forming flap 12. Each of the top forming flaps 11 and 12 is foldably connected along top scores 13 to adjacent side walls 14. A bottom panel 15 is foldably connected to the lower edges of the adjacent side walls 14 along bottom scores 16. The cone holder blank illustrated in Fig. 1 is adapted to contain three cones of wound yarn; however, it is apparent that the cone holder illustrated may be modified to contain any desired number of cones. Top panel openings 17 are provided for receiving the button of the cone spindle. The openings 17 of the outer top flap 11 are spaced so that they will be in registering relation with the openings 17 formed in the inner top flap 12 in the erected position of the container. The top panel openings 17 are also spaced so as to maintain each cone in a position to prevent all contact between adjacent cones within the holder. Similarly, relatively larger, bottom panel openings 18 are provided to receive the base of the yarn cone spindle. Interlocking extensions 19 are formed from material in the adjacent side margins of the flaps 11 and 12. Extension receiving openings 20 are provided in the lower margin of the side walls 14. Each opening 20 is disposed directly across the side walls 14 from a corresponding interlocking extension 19. Longitudinal slots 21 are provided in the bottom panel 15 adjacent the extension receiving openings 20. The length of the openings 20 and the adjacent slots 21 is substantially equal the length of the extensions 19. Furthermore, the width of the opening 20 is substantially equal to the height of the extension 19. Transverse slots 22 are provided in the end edge of the bottom panel 15 and in spaced parallel relation intermediate the bottom panel openings 18. The distance between adjacent transverse slots 22 is substantially equal to the width of the cone holder. The

' dimensions of the slots 21 and 22 are such that they are adapted to snugly receive the interlocking extensions 19. The outer top forming flap 11 is provided with a pair of locking semi-circular tongues 23 spaced intermediate and adjacent the top panel openings 17. The tongues 23 are foldably connected to the outer top forming flap along short parallel scores 24. The inner top forming flap 12 is provided with spaced retaining flaps 25 which are in turn foldably connected to the top flap 12 along top scores 26.

The embodiment of the cone holder illustrated may be erected, in any suitable manner; however, a preferred method is to fold the side walls 14 upwardly about the bottom scores 16 into substantially right angular relation to the bottom panel 15. The wound yarn cones as shown at A in Fig. 2 are then placed on the bottom panel 15 so that the base of the spindle extends through the bottom panel in the bottom panel openings 18. The inner top forming flap 12 is then folded inwardly about the adjacent top score 13 into substantially horizontal position against the tops of the previously placed wound yarn cones. In this position, the button or top of the yarn cone spindle extends through the top panel openings 17 in the inner top flap 12. The outer top forming flap 11 is then folded about its adjacent top score 13 into fiatwise horizontal position with the previously positioned inner top forming flap 12. Likewise, the buttons of yarn cone spindles extend through the top panel openings 17 in the outer top forming flaps 11. The top panels 11 and 12 are locked into position by forcing the looking tongues 23 inwardly about the parallel scores 24, thus forcing the subjacent retaining flaps 25 inwardly and downwardly. After the locking tongues 23 have been forced inward to a substantially vertical position, the retaining flaps 25 will spring upward in substantially horizontal relation thereby securely locking the tongues 23 in position. The holder is now ready to be loaded into the master shipping container. It is apparent, however, that any suitable type of top flap locking arrangement may be used in place in the lock described.

A preferred method of loading and positioning the cone holders within a master container is shown in Figs. 3 and 4. The first or bottom layer consists of four cone holders, three of them being positioned lengthwise and the fourth being placed transversely across their ends. As shown in Fig. 4, in each subsequent layer, the placement of the transversely positioned cone holder is alternated, thereby providing a staggered stack, not unlike the stacking method used in masonry work. It will be apparent that when the yarn cone holders are placed as suggested, the interlocking extensions 19 of cone holders in the bottom layer will automatically extend into and be firmly received by either the longitudinal slots 21 or the transverse slots 22. For instance, when a cone holder is stacked longitudinally upon a holder, the interlocking extensions 19 of the lower holder will automatically fit into the openings 20 and the adjacent longitudinal slots 21. However, if it is desired to stack the holder transversely or at right angles to the subjacent holder, the upper extensions 19 of the lower holder will extend into the transverse slots 22 in the holder above. Obviously, which transverse slots 22 the extensions 19 fit into, depends upon the position of the upper holder with respect to the holder below. For example, the extensions 19 of the lower holder might extend into the transverse slot 22 on the end edge of the holder above and the transverse slot adjacent thereto. If there happened to be an adja cent lower holder, then its extensions 19 would extend into the central transverse slots 22 sharing one of the slots 22 with the extensions of the adjacent cone holder. This interlocking is equally effective whether the subjacent cone holder is disposed in parallel relation or in right angular relation to the cone holder above.

It is obvious that the cone holders embodying this invention may be stacked in any one of a number of different ways. One example is shown in Fig. where the first layer contains three holders placed side by side and the second layer contains three cone holders, each placed transversely to the holders in the first layer.

Obviously, extending from the top horizontal layer of cone holders will be exposed extensions 19. These topmost extensions 19 may be simply folded downwardly into the top panels 11 and 12 or if desired, a single die-cut horizontal sheet may be provided. This sheet should be substantially equal to the horizontal cross sectional area of the outside master container. The die-cut sheet will be provided with die-cut slots spaced as are the slots 21 and 22. In this manner, the topmost extensions 19 are d snugly received into the slots in the horizontal sheet, thereby preventing deflection and further reducing movement within the container.

It is to be understood that the foregoing detailed description is given merely by way of illustration and many variations may be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope of this invention.

What I claim is:

1. A plurality of yarn cone holders, each holder having. opposing upstanding side walls, a bottom panel, and top. forming, inturned, upper marginal side wall flaps, each of said side walls having spaced upper marginal vertical extensions struck from the adjacent upper marginal side wall flap and spaced, cooperating, vertically aligned, extension receiving cut-out portions positioned along the bottom margin of said side walls, said bottom panels of said cone holders having cooperating longitudinal slots adjacent said side wall cut-outs, and transverse slots along the end edges of said bottom panel and in spaced parallel relation therebetween, said cone holders being arranged in stacked, horizontal layers, the said side wall extensions snugly extending into the longitudinal bottom panel slots and positioned in flush relation into the side wall cut-outs of the holder stacked above.

2. A yarn cone holder comprising a bottom panel and an opposing pair of upright side walls, each of said side walls having a foldably connected, inturned, top panel forming flap, each of said side walls being provided with a plurality of spaced, rigid integral, upright, locking tabs connected to the upper margin thereof, said locking tabs being formed of adjacent portions of said inturned top panel flaps and positioned in flush, coplanar relationship with their adjacent side wall, the lower margins of said side walls being provided with cooperating locking tab receiving cut-outs, said bottom panel having longitudinal tab receiving slots adjacent said lower marginal side wall cut-outs, and transverse tab receiving slots in the end edges of said bottom panel and in spaced parallel relation therebetween, the distance between said transverse bottom panel slots being substantially equal the width of said cone holder.

3. A plurality of yarn cone holders, each holder having opposing upstanding side walls, a bottom panel and top forming, inturned upper marginal side wall flaps, each of said side walls having spaced upper marginal vertical extensions struck from the adjacent upper marginal side wall flaps, and spaced vertically aligned, co-operating extension receiving cut-out portions positioned along the bottom margin of said side wall, the bottom panels of said cone holder having cooperating longitudinal slots adjacent said side wall cut-outs and transverse extension receiving slots along the end margins thereof and in spaced parallel relation therebetween, the distance between adjacent transverse slots being substantially equal to the width of said yarn cone holders, said cone holders being arranged in stacked, horizontal layers, the said side wall extensions of one horizontal layer of cone holders snugly extending into the longitudinal and transverse bottom panel slots and positioned in flush relation into the side wall cut-outs of the horizontal layer of cone holders stacked above.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,225,705 Dyson May 8,1917

1,604,391 Croy Oct. 26,1926

2,010,683 Williams Aug. 6,1935

2,408,159 Boh Sept. 24,1946

2,559,948 Currie July 10,1951

FOREIGN PATENTS 53,507 Netherlands June 15, 1942

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1225705 *May 5, 1915May 8, 1917Edward T DysonShipping-case.
US1604391 *Aug 22, 1925Oct 26, 1926Harry C CroyToy building block
US2010683 *Mar 2, 1935Aug 6, 1935Robert Gaylord IncPackage for rayon cones or the like
US2408159 *Mar 6, 1944Sep 24, 1946O B Andrews CompanyPacking wrapper
US2559948 *Aug 2, 1949Jul 10, 1951Dacam CorpCarton for cylindrical objects
NL53507C * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2827165 *Aug 9, 1956Mar 18, 1958Mead Atlanta Paper CompanyPaperboard wrapper for cans and the like
US2904297 *Jul 5, 1957Sep 15, 1959Charles Dreifus JrPallet
US2922561 *Nov 1, 1956Jan 26, 1960Carton Associates IncCartons
US3139981 *Jul 30, 1962Jul 7, 1964David AkeirebPremium holding package
US3163344 *Feb 18, 1963Dec 29, 1964Chicken Delight IncContainer
US3393858 *May 2, 1967Jul 23, 1968Laeisz FRectangular collapsible carton for the shipment of bananas
US3397776 *Oct 28, 1964Aug 20, 1968Continental Can CoWraparound carton and blank therefor
US4053098 *Aug 10, 1976Oct 11, 1977International Paper CompanyShipping carton
US4053100 *Sep 1, 1976Oct 11, 1977International Paper CompanyShipping carton
US4134533 *Dec 19, 1977Jan 16, 1979Container Corporation Of AmericaStackable container
US4245773 *Aug 22, 1979Jan 20, 1981Crown Zellerbach CorporationContainer with stacking alignment and latching structure
US4304353 *Jun 16, 1980Dec 8, 1981Crown Zellerbach CorporationContainer with latching structure
US5039005 *Dec 26, 1989Aug 13, 1991Maxco Supply, Inc.Container and method for manufacture thereof
US5758771 *Sep 5, 1996Jun 2, 1998Formall IncPallet system
US6889893Mar 9, 2004May 10, 2005Weyerhaeuser CompanyStackable container with stack-tabs
US20100314268 *Jun 16, 2009Dec 16, 2010Wilbert Blair GoodmanUniversal shoe box
EP0738664A1 *Apr 12, 1996Oct 23, 1996Smurfit SocarSelfsupporting paperboard sales package,in particular for thermoformed pots
WO1997028051A1 *Jan 15, 1997Aug 7, 1997Auclair Jean MichelReinforced multi-tier carton
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/392, 206/511, 206/509, 229/103.2, 229/915
International ClassificationB65D5/00, B65D71/00, B65D71/16
Cooperative ClassificationB65D2571/00172, B65D5/001, Y10S229/915, B65D2571/00895, B65D2571/0066, B65D2571/00283, B65D71/16, B65D2571/00716
European ClassificationB65D71/16, B65D5/00B