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Publication numberUS2722146 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 1, 1955
Filing dateAug 25, 1952
Priority dateAug 25, 1952
Also published asDE1026389B
Publication numberUS 2722146 A, US 2722146A, US-A-2722146, US2722146 A, US2722146A
InventorsByrem Gerald H
Original AssigneeAircraft Marine Prod Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Semi-automatic crimping tool
US 2722146 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 1, 1955 G. H. BYREM SEMI-AUTOMATIC CRIMPING Toor.

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SEMI-AUTOMATIC CRIMPING TOOL Filed Aug. 25, 1952 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 ,wwe/Mfrs.-

Nov. l, 1955 G. H. BYREM SEMI-AUTOMATIC CRIMPING Toor.

4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Aug. 25, 1952 INVENTOR.' se/1z0 A. yzEM M 15J/W,

A Tron/viri- Nov. 1, 1955 G. H. BYREM 2,722,146

SEMI-AUTOMATIC CRvIMPING TOOL Filed Aug. 25, 1952 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 'Tlc'.. 0 2 94 5 65 92: 20

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United States Patent O SEMI-AUTOMATIC CRIMPIN G TOOL Gerald H. Byrem, Harrisburg, Pa., assignor to Aircraft- Marine Products Inc., Harrisburg, Pa.

This invention relates to hand tools for crimping electrical connectors of the type used for joining the ends of'electrical conductors to provide an electrically conductive 'joint therebetween. Hand tools embodying the present invention can be used in a variety of different ways to crimp many different types of connectors. However, the utility of the present hand tool can be most conveniently pointed out by selecting a specific illustrative application for which it is especially useful. Accordingly the tool will be initially described in relation to its use with respect to a sleeve type connector such as that described in the copending application of George T. Ritter, Serial No. 242,850, led August 21, 1951. A connector of this type is illustrated in Figure 14 of the drawings of the present application.

To effect a joint between two conductors with this type of connector the insulation is stripped from the ends of the conductors to predetermined distances that are proportioned to the wire sizes of the conductors, and the stripped ends are then inserted into the sleeve connector until they are in substantially abutting relation Within the connector. Thereafter the connector is crimped with a suitable tool at several points to provide thel joint illustrated in Figure 14. Referring to Figure 14 the center crimp engages the stripped ends of the wires to provide an electrical connection therebetween and the two end crimps 12 engage the insulation of the conductors to provide a tight joint. p

A hand tool of the general type to which the present invention relates commonly comprises a crimping head provided with one or more crimping molds, a plunger having one or more dies aligned with the molds ofthe crimping head, a pair of pivoted handles connected to the plunger and operable to force the plunger dies toward the molds to crimp a connector therebetween, and a magazine or the like containing a supply of blank connectors that can be fed to the tool for crimping. It has been previously proposed that such tools be provided with an automatic feed, that is, that they be so constructed that upon retraction of the plunger a connector blank is automatically fed into the path of the plunger and advanced thereby toward the molds of the crimping head. While such an automatic feed is useful for many applications, there are some cases where it is preferable to have a feed that may be called semi-automatic in the sense that feeding of the connectors is eiected by manual manipulation of a part of the tool that operates independently of the plunger-operatingy handles. With such a semi-automatic feed, for example, the operating handles can be actuated a number of times to cause the plunger to re-crimp a given connectorwithout having another connector blank fed into the path of the plunger to interfere with the re-crimping operation.

It is accordingly an object of the present invention to provide a magazine-type hand tool for crimping electrical connectors'that is semi-automatie in operation and will permit re-cn'mping of a connector Without feeding of lanewconnectorblank. It is another object of theV invention to provide a hand tool of this general type wherein connector blanks from a supply of such blanks can be fed into operative position for crimping by a simple manual operation as desired. It is a further object of the invention to provide an improved Wire holder for holding a pair of conductors in proper position within a connector blank for crimping action by the hand tool. Other objects of the invention will be in part obvious and in part pointed out hereafter. y

The many objects and advantages of the present invention can best be understood and appreciated by reference to the accompanying drawings which illustrate a hand tool incorporating a preferred embodiment of the present invention and wherein:

Figure 1 is a top plan view of the hand tool showing the crimping head and the toggle action of the operating handles;

Figure 2 is an elevation further showing the general organization of the hand tool;

Figure 3 is a perspective view of the crimping head with the upper portion thereof removed to show the manner in which the crimping dies of the plunger cooper-` ate with the crimping molds of the crimping head;

Figure 4 is a vertical section taken substantially ou the line 4 4 of Figure 1 and showing the plunger in advanced position and the location of the connector blank magazine just after it has been initially inserted in the hand tool;

Figure 5 is a view similar to Figure 4 showing the plunger and magazine in retracted position.

Figure 6v is `a View similar to Figure 5 but with the magazine advanced to feed a connector for crimping;

Figure 7 is a View similar to Figure 6 showing a con-j nector being crimped by the plunger, which is shown in its advanced position;

Figure 8 is a perspective view of the magazine showing its general organization;

Figure 9 is a top plan view of the magazine showing a number of connector blanks therein, the connector follower and the actuating spring of the magazine;

Figure 10 is a vertical section taken on the line 10-10 of Figure 9 further showing the relationship between the connector blanks, their follower and the actuating spring;

Figure 11 is a top plan view of the magazine slide that closes the discharge opening of the magazine prior to its insertion in the hand tool;

Figure 12 is a perspective view of the connector blank follower;

Figure 13 is a perspective view of the wire holder, and

nearest the crimping head 14 are pivotally connected by a pin 24 to each other and also to a plunger 26 mounted for reciprocating movement within the crimping head 14.

Referring to Figure 3, the crimping head 14 is provided With a central crimping nest or mold 30 flanked byfthe crimping molds 32 and 34 on each side of the central mold. The end of plunger 26 nearest to the crimping molds is provided with corresponding dies which,

when the plunger 26 is advanced toward the crimping'` molds, cooperate with the molds to crimp a connector plunger 26 is retracted, to eject a crimped connector from the tool. l

,y .Reverting' to Figures ,1 and 2, the cooperatiughandles p and 22 support a ratchet mechanism 36 that prevents separating of the handles until after they have been closed to the extent necessary to crimp a connector, and an insulation stripper .38 that can be operated .to cut and `strip a predetermined length of insulation from an insulated conductor. The ratchet mechanism and insulation stripper can be Vof .any suitable and known construction and may be, for example, constructed like the corresponding parts ofthe hand tool shown in the Klingler application Serial No. 254,117, led October 3l, 195 l.

Extending over the top of the crimping head 14 and secured thereto there is a wire holder member 40, the configuration of which is best shown in Figure 13 of the drawing. Referring to Figure 13 as well as to Figures l and 2, the wire holder `comprises a U-shaped frame 42 secured to .the .head 14 by rivets 44 and having a pair of forwardly extending arms 46 that extend past lthe crimping molds .of the head 14 on either side thereof. Each of the arms 46 is provided with a slot 46a within which a conductor can be wedged to hold its stripped end properly positioned .in a connector within the crimping head.

Referring now to Figure 4 of the drawings, mounted for sliding movement in a vertical bore 47 of vplunger 26 there is a magazine actuating plunger 48 that is urged upwardly by a spring 50 interposed between the lower surface of plunger 48 and the bottom surface of the vertical bore 47. `Plunger 48 is cut away at one side to form a narrow slot 54. A pin 56 `is .seated in plunger 26 and vextends into slot 54 in such manner as to prevent rotation of plunger 48. Formed integral with the plunger 48 and extending upward therefrom there is a magazine retracting pin 58 having a sloping upper surface, the function of which will be described hereafter.

As indicated in vFigure 3, overlying the plunger 26 there is a ramp-like member 60 which in Figure 3 Vis shown detached from the crimping head 14 but normally forms part of the vcrimping head. The ramp 60 is cut away to form a notch 62 that registers with the bore 47 of plunger 26 and receives the retracting pin 58 when plunger 26 is withdrawn. The width of notch 62 is less than the diameter of plunger 48 and hence the lower surface Aof ramp 60 (see .Figure 4) provides *a stop to limit upward Vmovement of plunger Y48.

The ramp 60 cooperates with the top and upper side portions of frame l42 of wire holder 40 to define a channel :64 that is constructed and arranged to receive a connector blank supply magazine. The construction of the magazine, which is generally designated by the numeral 66, is best shown in Figures 8 to l2 of the drawings. The magazine is of hollow, generally rectanguloid construction with a longitudinal slot 68 at its upper surface and a discharge opening 70 at its left hand end (as viewed in Figs. 8 to 12). As particularly shown in Figure 10, the magazine is adapted to contain a series of connector blanks 72 that are 'urged to the left by a follower 74 and a spring 76. Prior to use in the hand tool of the discharge opening 70 of the magazine is closed by a -slide 78 that is constructed for sliding movement along the bottom wall 80 of the magazine.

Referring to Figure ll, the slide 78 is provided with a notch or slot 82 that cooperates with the retracting pin 58 in a 4manner described hereafter. At its other end, slide 78 has a downwardly extending lip 84 which `(see Figs. 9 and 10) extends through an opening `81 in the bottom wall 80 of the magazine and helps in guiding and positioning the slide 78. The wall .80 of the magazine 66 is provided with a notch 86 having a shape similar to that of the notch 82 of slide 78. The `rear end of the magazine 66 is closed by a spring clip closure member 88 (best shown in Fig. 8), which is removable to permit assembly and maintenance of the magazine, and has outwardly extending ears 90 that can be inserted in the openings 92 inthe side walls of the magazine 66 to hold the end closure in place. As previously indicated the blanks are urged toward the discharge end of the magazine by a spring 76 which bears against closure 88 at one end and at its other against follower 74. The configuration of the follower 74 is particularly shown in Figure l2. The top of the magazine 66 is provided with a pair of buttons 94 that cooperate with corresponding holes 96 (see Fig. 5) in the channel 64 to ensure proper positioning of the magazine when it is in its retracted position and also to retain the magazine within .the channel 64.

The manner in which connector blanks are fed to the crimping molds for crimping is illustrated in Figures 4 to 7 of the drawings. Referring to Figure 4, the magazine is shown in this figure in the position it occupies when first inserted in channel 64 of the hand tool. As indicated in Figure 4, the plunger 26 is normally in its advanced position with handles 20 and 22 together when a full magazine is first inserted. As the magazine is inserted, retracting pin 58 engages notch 82 of slide 78 and restrains its against further movement to the left. Thus .as the magazine approaches the position shown in Fig. 4, the slide 78 is in effect Withdrawn to permit connector blanks to be fed from the magazine through discharge opening 70. With the parts positioned as shown in Fig. 4, the notch.82 of slide 78 is aligned with the notch 86 of the lower wall of magazine 66.

When the magazine has been inserted the handles v20 and 22 are separated, whereupon plunger 26 is retracted and the retracting pin or finger 58 retracts the magazine 66 to the position shown in Fig. 5. As shown in Fig. 5, with the magazine in this position, buttons 94 engage the holes 96 in the magazine housing.

When the plunger 26 has been fully retracted, the magazine 66 is manually advanced to the position shown'inFigure 6, whereupon a connector blank drops through the magazine discharge opening 70 into the path of yplunger 26. The handles 20 and 22 are then brought together to position the connector blank against the molds 30, 32 and 34, the wires to be connected are inserted in the ends of the connector blank and also in the wire holder slots 46a, and the handles are pressed together to crimp the connector as indicated in Figure 7. As the plunger 26 advances from the position of Figure 6 to that of Figure 7, the pin 58 bears against the bottom 80 of magazine `66 and is depressed thereby against the action of spring 50 until it reaches the aligned notches 82 and 86, whereupon it moves upwardly to the position shown in Figure 7.

yWhen the plunger 26 is again retracted, the magazine is withdrawn Ito the position shown in Figure 5. With the magazine in this position the plunger 26 can be 'advanced or retracted without feeding another vblank from the magazine and thus the connector that is in crimping position can be recrimped, if desired, without interference due to feeding of a second connector blank.

From the foregoing description it should `be apparent that the present invention provides a hand tool capable of achieving the several objects set forth at the beginning of the specification. A simple and effective manually operable means is kprovided for feeding connector blanks for crimping, and the mode of cooperation of the connector blank supply and other parts of the hand tool is such that the plunger can be fully retracted and advanced without feeding a second connector blank for crimping until it is desired to do so. Thus a given connector can be recrimped several times if desired before it is ejected from the tool.

It is, of course, to be understood that the foregoing description is illustrative only and that numerous changes can be made in the embodiment described without departing from the spirit of the invention as set forth inthe appended claims.

What I claim as new is:

l. In a tool for crimping electrical connectors, in cornbination, ,a crimping head having one or more crimping molds therein, ka plunger movably mounted in said head and having one or more crimping dies, each of which is positioned to cooperate with one of said molds to crimp a connector positioned in the path of said plunger, means for moving said plunger and associated dies toward and away from said molds and a magazine mounted on said head and adapted to hold a supply of connectors for crimping, said magazine being mounted for manual movement from an inactive position to a connector delivery position for delivery of a connector to be crimped into the path of said plunger and said plunger having a part engageable with said magazine to return said magazine to said inactive position when said plunger is retracted from said molds.

2. In a tool for crimping electrical connectors, in combination, a crimping head having one or more crimping molds therein, a plunger mounted for reciprocating movement in said head and having one or more crimping dies, each of which is positioned to cooperate with one of said molds to crimp a connector positioned in the path of said plunger, means for moving said plunger and associated dies toward and away from said molds and an elongated magazine mounted on said head with its axis forming an acute angle with the path of said plunger, said magazine being mounted for manual movement from an inactive position to a connector delivery position for delivery of a connector into the path of said plunger, and said plunger having a magazine retracting pin positioned to engage said magazine on retraction of said plunger to return said magazine to said inactive position.

3. A tool according to claim 2 and wherein said pin is slidably mounted in said plunger and is spring urged toward said magazine.

4. In a tool for crimping electrical connectors in combination, a crimping head having one or more crimping molds therein, a plunger movably mounted in said head and having one or more crimping dies, each of which is positioned to cooperate with one of said molds to crimp a connector positioned in the path of said plunger, means for moving said plunger and associated dies toward and away from said molds, and a magazine mounted on said head and adapted to hold a supply of connectors for crimping, said magazine being mounted for manual movement from an inactive position to a connector delivery position for delivery of a connector to be crimped into the path of said plunger, said magazine having a delivery opening located near the path of said plunger when said magazine is in its connector delivery position, an internal spring biased to urge said supply of connectors toward said delivery opening and a closure for said delivery opening, said plunger having a part engageable with said closure to open said closure when said magazine is initially moved from said inactive position to said connector delivery position.

5. In a tool for crimping electrical connectors in combination, a crimping head having one or more crimping molds therein, a plunger movably mounted in said head and having one or more crimping dies, each of which is positioned to cooperate with one of said molds to crimp a connector positioned in the path of said plunger, means for moving said plunger and associated dies toward and away from said molds, and a magazine housing mounted on said head with its axis forming an acute angle with the path of said plunger, said housing being adapted to receive a magazine containing a supply of connectors to be crimped and said plunger including a magazine retracting pin positioned to extend into said housing during at least a part of the movement of said plunger.

6. In a tool for crimping electrical connectors in combination, a crimping head having one or more crimping molds therein, a plunger movably mounted in said head and having one or more crimping dies, each of which is positioned to cooperate with one of said molds to crimp a connector positioned in the path of said plunger, means for moving said plunger and associated dies toward and away from said molds, a magazine housing mounted on said head with its axis forming an acute angle with the path of said plunger, a magazine adapted to hold a supply of connectors for crimping slidably mounted in said housing, said magazine being mounted for manual movement from an inactive position to a connector-delivery position to deliver a connector to the path of said plunger and said plunger having a part engageable with said magazine to return said magazine to said inactive position when said plunger is retracted from said molds, said housing and said magazine being provided with cooperating detent elements for retaining said magazine at said inactive position.

7. In a tool for crimping electrical connectors, in combination, a crimping head having one or more aligned crimping molds therein, a plunger movably mounted in said head and having one or more crimping dies, each of which is positioned to cooperate with one of said molds to crimp a connector placed in the path of said plunger, means for moving said plunger and associated dies toward and away from said molds, a magazine housing mounted on said head, a magazine slidable in said housing and adapted to mold a supply of connectors for crimping, said magazine having a delivery opening, an internal spring biased to urge connectors toward said delivery opening, a slotted closure for said opening and a slotted base, said magazine being manually slidable from an inactive position to a connector-delivery position for delivery of a connector through said opening to the path of said plunger, said plunger having a part positioned to extend into said housing and engageable with the slots of said closure and base, whereby initial movement of said magazine from its inactive to its connector delivery position retracts said closure to open said delivery opening and subsequent retraction of said plunger causes said part to engage said slotted base to return said magazine to its inactive position.

8. In a tool for crimping electrical connectors in combination, a crimping head having a plurality of aligned crimping molds therein, a plunger mounted for reciprocating movement in said head and having a plurality of crimping dies, each of which is positioned to cooperate with one of said molds to crimp a connector positioned in the path of said plunger, a par of handles pivotally secured to said head and said plunger for moving said plunger and associated dies toward and away from said molds, a wire-holding member secured to said head and having a pair of wire-holding slots aligned with said molds and laterally spaced from said head, a magazine housing mounted on said head with its axis forming an acute angle with the path of said plunger, and a magazine slidablein said housing and adapted to hold a supply of connectors for crimping, said magazine having a discharge opening, a slotted closure therefor, a slotted base and an internal spring biased to urge connectors toward said delivery opening, said magazine being mounted in said housing for manual movement from an inactive position to a connector-delivery position, said plunger having a magazine retracting pin slidably mounted therein and a spring for urging said pin toward the base of said magazine, said retracting pin being positioned to extend into said housing during at least a part of the movement of said plunger and being engageable with the slots of said closure and base, whereby upon initial movement of said magazine to said connector delivery position said pin retracts said closure to open said delivery opening and upon subsequent retractive movement of said plunger said pin engages the slot of said base to return said magazine to its inactive position.

9. In a tool for crimping electrical connectors, in combination, a crimping head having one or more crimping molds therein, a plunger movably mounted in said head and having one or more crimping dies, each of which is positioned to cooperate with one of said molds to crimp a connector positioned in the path of said plunger, means for moving said plunger and associated dies toward and away from said molds and a magazine mounted on said References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 814,020 Clifford Mar. 6, 1906 3L Sommer Apr. 17, Brenizer July 6, Burns Sept. 2, Bratz Sept. 14', Swengel Nov. 26, Schroeder June 5, Blumensaadt Nov. 13, Carlson Nov. 25, Anderson et al. Feb. 1,0,

'nner-mala

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US1451717 *May 26, 1921Apr 17, 1923Keystone Steel & Wire CompanyHand tool
US2086400 *Feb 29, 1936Jul 6, 1937Andrew V GroupeTool for compressing sleeves upon wires
US2254416 *May 23, 1940Sep 2, 1941Nat Telephone Supply CoCompression tool
US2329385 *Jun 6, 1940Sep 14, 1943American Chain & Cable CoSwaging tool
US2411838 *Feb 5, 1944Nov 26, 1946Aircraft Marine Prod IncTool
US2555903 *Aug 9, 1948Jun 5, 1951Schroeder Emmett HClip-applying tool
US2574811 *Feb 7, 1948Nov 13, 1951Universal Wire Spring CoPortable clipping tool
US2618993 *Jan 14, 1948Nov 25, 1952Aircraft Marine Prod IncConnector forming tool with ratchet means for compelling precise operation
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2806229 *Mar 13, 1956Sep 17, 1957Pletz Bruce OSinker pellet splitting and line clamping device
US2842018 *Dec 8, 1955Jul 8, 1958Amp IncRatchet type hand tool for severing and crimping magazine fed electrical connectors
US2915929 *Feb 20, 1957Dec 8, 1959Amp IncTool with lost motion linkage for crimping electrical connectors
US3002547 *Aug 18, 1958Oct 3, 1961Amp IncTerminal applicator
US3086573 *Jan 19, 1959Apr 23, 1963Adams Rudolph RMachine for uniting rod ends
US3205568 *Nov 19, 1962Sep 14, 1965Amp IncCrimping tool
US3545065 *Jun 10, 1968Dec 8, 1970Medlin Theodore WFastener applying tool
US4080820 *Sep 2, 1976Mar 28, 1978Walter Kidde & Company, Inc.In-line crimping tool
US4133102 *Jan 19, 1977Jan 9, 1979John T. ThompsonAutomatic connector presser
US4991289 *Jun 23, 1989Feb 12, 1991Amp IncorporatedCrimping die and crimped electrical connection therefrom
US7228624 *Apr 1, 2005Jun 12, 2007Alfred E. Mann Foundation For Scientific ResearchMethods for connecting wires
DE3121235A1 *May 27, 1981Dec 23, 1982Steinmeier Albert Gmbh Co KgCrimping machine for crimp connection
EP1727246A1 *May 18, 2006Nov 29, 2006MecatractionDevice for holding a connection element
Classifications
U.S. Classification29/751, 29/759, 29/816
International ClassificationH01R43/04, H01R43/045
Cooperative ClassificationH01R43/045
European ClassificationH01R43/045