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Publication numberUS2723491 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 15, 1955
Filing dateFeb 14, 1952
Priority dateFeb 14, 1952
Publication numberUS 2723491 A, US 2723491A, US-A-2723491, US2723491 A, US2723491A
InventorsHersey Walter O
Original AssigneeKnickerbocker Plastic Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toy gun
US 2723491 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. l5, 1955 w. o. HERSEY 2,723,491

TOY GUN Filed Feb. 14. 1952 TOY GUN Walter 0. Hersey, Glendale, Calif., assigner to Knickerbocker Plastic Co., Inc., Glendale, Calif., a corporation of California Application February 14, 1952, Serial No. 271,526

2 Claims. (Cl. 46-191) This invention relates to a noise-making toy gun, and particularly to the trigger and hammer mechanism for such gun.

The trigger and hammer mechanism of my invention is simple in that it has only two moving parts and may be mounted on two pins. vThe construction is rugged and produces a loud and realistic sound. While I have designed it for a toy gun, it will, as will be evident to those skilled in this art, be adaptable to a real gun.

My invention will be further described in connection with the drawing, in which Fig. 1 is a half section of the gun showing the trigger and hammer mechanism in rest position or in the equivalent tiring position;

Fig. 2 is a detail of the trigger and hammer, the hammer head approaching striking position;

Fig. 2a is a detail of the trigger in cocked position;

Fig. 3 is an irregular section taken on line 3 3 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 4 is an irregular section taken on line 4-4 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 5 is a detail section of Fig. 2, showing the hammer approaching the cocked position shown in Fig. 2a;

Fig. 6 is a perspective view of the hammer head.

The gun as illustrated is made in two molded halves, conveniently but not necessarily of plastic. The halves when assembled in the conventional manner make up a gun. Each half contains the handle 1, the barrel 2, the trigger guard 3, and the anvil 4. The halves carry a peripheral flange 5 which, when nested or abutted against the peripheral tlange of the other half, complete the housing of the gun.

Nested between the tWo halves is the hammer and trigger mechanism. The trigger is cast or, if desired, forged to include a trigger finger 6, a dog 7, and a spring support rod 8 which carries a bore 9 near its end. The trigger is pivoted on pivot pin 10 passing through the two halves of the gun.

The hammer is composed of a hammer head 12 forming a part of the hammer head arm 13 which extends in a roughly perpendicular direction to the hammer face 14 of the hammer head 12. At the extreme end of the arm 13 is a bore 16. The radius arm 17 extends in an approximately perpendicular direction to the arm 13 and terminates in a hub 18 containing a slot 19. The pin 20 passes through the slot and is xed in each of the halves of the gun on assembly thereof. The radius arm carries a cam shoulder 22. The length of the arm of the dog 7 from the pivot pin 10 is such as to intersect the cam shoulder 22. The tension spring 21 is connected to the hammer and the trigger by positioning its ends in suitable spring supports, to wit, in the bores 9 and 16.

One of the important and novel features of my trigger and cocking mechanism is the simplicity of the mechanism whereby the single movement of the trigger both cocks and trips the hammer. As will be observed, the point of support of the spring on the hammer, i. e., bore 16,

Y, 2,723,491 Patented Nov. 15, 1955 the spring is in tension. The resultant of this tension force, applying the simple principle of the resolution of forces, is a component of force along the axis of the slot, tending to pull the hammer upward in the direction of the arrow on B-B and holding the pin 20 against the base of the slot 19, as shown in Fig. 1. As the trigger 6 is pulled counterclockwise, the arm 8 and the dog 7 pivot counterclockwise about the pin 10. The bore 9 moves to a position below the horizontal (see Fig, 5) so that the axis of the spring A-A now makes a reliex angle with the horizontal. The resultant of the tension force axially of the spring i. e., along the axis A-A, is a downward push on the radius rod 17 (arrow C). However, the dog 7, abutting against the cam shoulder 22 as the trigger rotates counterclockwise during the cooking motion, creates a pressure in a tangential and upward direction (arrow D) suicient to overcome the downward force represented by arrow C. The result is that during the counterclockwise rotation of the trigger, the radius arm 17 and the hammer are rotated clockwise with the pivot pin 20 in the lower end of the slot 18. As the trigger completes its counterclockwise rotation it clears the cam shoulder. The upward force imposed on the cam shoulder by the dog 7 (arrow D) is released and the downward force (arrow C), resulting from the positioning of the spring axis A-A at a reflex angle to the horizontal, snaps the hammer 12 and radius arm 17 downward so that the pin 20 is now in the upper end of the slot 19 (see Fig. 2). At the same time the tension of the spring will pull the hammer head forward so that the face of the hammer head 12 slaps against the anvil 4 with a loud bang.

It will be observed that the axis of the slot 19 in Fig. 2 is inclined to the vertical at an acute angle in a counterclockwise direction, so that as the radius arm moves down in taking the position shown in Fig. 2, with the hammer against the anvil, the extreme edge of the cam shoulder has moved to the right, that is, the radius of the end of the cam shoulder about the pin 20 has shortened. Thus, when the trigger is released the spring tension moves the trigger to its rest position (see Fig. l), the trigger rotates clockwise and the extreme end of the dog 7 clears the end of the cam shoulder. Now, however, the spring and arm 8 are above the horizontal, as in Fig. l, and the resultant of the force causes the radius arm to be raised and the pin to move to the bottom of the slot, thus completing the cycle. v

While l have described a particular embodiment of my invention for the purpose of illustration, it should be understood that various mo'dications and adaptations thereof may be made within the spirit of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.

I claim:

l. A pistol comprising a barrel, an anvil, a hammer carrying a hammer head, a radius rod, said hammer being mounted on said radius rod, a pivot pin, a slot in said radius rod, the axis of said slot being at an acute angle to a vertical to the axis of said barrel, said pivot pin being positioned in said slot and said hammer head being in striking relation to said anvil on rotation of said radius rod about said pin, a trigger, a second pivot pin, said trigger being pivotally mounted on said second pivot pin, an arm connected to said trigger, a spring connected to said arm and to said hammer, normally holding said radius rod in a raised position with its pivot pin disposed in the lower end of said slot, a dog connected to said trigger, and a cam shoulder on said radius rod cooperating with said dog under the force of said spring so that when the trigger is operated the hammer is irst rotated to cocked position, the radius rod is moved to the position with the pivot pin disposed'in the upper end of the slot, and to return the hammer to normal position with aA hammer blow against the anvil.

2. A pistol comprising a barrel, an anvil, a hammer carrying a hammer head, a radius rod, said hammer being mounted on said radius rod, a pivot pin, a slot in said radius rod, said pivot pin being positioned in said slot and said hammer head being in striking relation to said anvil on rotation of said radius rod about said pin, a trigger, a second pivot pin, said trigger being pivotally mounted on said second pivot pin, an arm connected to said trigger, a spring connected to said arm and said hammer, the point of connection of said spring to said 15 arm being above a line parallel to the axis of said barrel and passing through the point of connection of said spring to said hammer and normally holding said radius rod in a raised position with its pivot pin disposed in the lower end of said slot, a dog connected to said trigger, and a cam shoulder on said radius rod cooperating with said dog under the force of said spring so that when the trigger is operated the hammer is rst rotated to cocked position, the radius rod is moved to the position with the pivot pin disposed in the upper end of the slot, and to return the hammer to normal position with a hammer blow against the anvil.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,597,089 Everett May 20, 1952

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2597089 *May 22, 1950May 20, 1952Product Engineering CoLoading mechanism for cap pistols
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3079718 *May 19, 1959Mar 5, 1963Allyn Harold DFiring mechanism with variable contact sear notch
US3088451 *Feb 1, 1961May 7, 1963Ideal Toy CorpTrick shot gun
US4365141 *Jan 5, 1981Dec 21, 1982Jerdon Industries, Inc.Hair dryer
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/407, 124/36, 42/58
International ClassificationA63H5/04, A63H5/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63H5/04
European ClassificationA63H5/04