Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2723673 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 15, 1955
Filing dateNov 7, 1950
Priority dateNov 7, 1950
Publication numberUS 2723673 A, US 2723673A, US-A-2723673, US2723673 A, US2723673A
InventorsJohn G Call
Original AssigneeTelatent Company Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tent framework
US 2723673 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

v- 5, 1955 .1. G. CALL 2,723,673

TENT FRAMEWORK Filed Nov. '7, 195Q 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. Jmv 61 67441.,

ATTORNEYS- Maw Nov. 15, 1955 J. G. CALL 2,723,673

TENT FRAMEWORK File'd Nov. 7, 1950 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 I Z? w w {I ATTORNEYS.

Nov. 15, 1955 J. 5.51m. 2,723,673

TENT FRAMEWORK Filed Nov. 7, 1950 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR- "X Jan/1v 6: 641.4,

ATT'O RN 5Y3.

J. G. CALL TENT FRAMEWORK Filed Nov. '7, 1950 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 10; 174 I 102 101 a p (4 B 'L V 'J 551 INVENTOR.

ATTORNEY$- United States Patent Company, Inc., Pikeville, Ky., a corporation of Kentucky Application November 7, 1950,'Serial No. 194,452

20 Claims. (c1. 135-4 This invention relates to a novel and improved tent framework and is continuation-in-part of my application Serial No. 35,718 filed Tune 28, 1948, on Tent Frame- 7 work, now abandoned. Myinvention has for its primary object the provision of a collapsible and adjustable tent framework which is relatively simple in construction and which is preferably fabricated of light weight metals, such as aluminum or magnesium, for ease of portability of the tent structure.

Another object of this invention is to provide a novel tent framework of light weight construction which may be collapsed and folded into any handy container for transportation to a desired site, such as to a grave.

A further object of this invention is to provide a collapsible light weight tent structure which is capable of being easily and conveniently set up in such a manner that the tent canvas may be loosely positioned on the framework and stretched into the desired tautness merely by lifting the frame within the tent canvas and adjusting the frame to any desired height.

Yet another object of this invention is to provide a tent supporting frame which is rigid enough to support a tent canvas thereon of any desired height without the necessity of providing a central pole or poles.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a skeleton frame for supporting a tent cover, including means for expeditiously effecting its lateral and vertical expansion to stretch and render taut the covering supported thereby, and to eliminate the old-fashioned center pole, leaving every inch of space inside the tent covering unobstructed and usable. The tent structure of the instant invention also obviates the necessity of employing guy ropes. The tent frame structure of the instant invention may be employed for any and all uses but has special reference to chapel tents such as are used for sheltering the attendants at funeral services in cemeteries.

These, together with various ancillary objects and features of the invention which will later become apparent as the following description proceeds, are attained by the device, a preferred embodiment of which has been illustrated by way of example only in the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Figure 1 is a perspective view illustrating one embodiment of my invention.

Figure 2 is a plan view of Figure l, but with certain members of the frame being slightly disjointed for purpose of illustration.

Figure 3 is a detailed plan view showing a casting and other appurtenances associated therewith as employed at the upper end of each corner post.

Figure 4 is a section taken along the plane of the line 44 of Figure3.

Figure 5 is an enlarged detailed plan view of another casting and associated elements as employed at the apex of my frame structure.

Figure 6 is a sectional view taken on the plane of the line 66 of Figure 5.

Figure 7 is a sectional view taken along the line 7-7 2,723,673 Patented Nov. 15, 1955- of Figure 5, and also showing a portion of the tent covering having attached thereto a novel fastening device.

Figure 8 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along the line 8-8 of Figure 1.

Figure 9 is an enlarged sectional view taken along the line 99 of Figure 8.

Figure 10 is an enlarged sectional view taken along the line 10-10 of Figure 8.

Figure 11 is a detailed side elevation of a casting.

Figure 12 is a sectional view showing the casting of Figure 4 and the casting of Figure 11 in assembled relation.

Figure 13 is a perspective view illustrating the collapsed and folded positions of certain frame members.

Figure 14 is a sectional view taken along the line 1414 of Figure 13.

Figure 15 is a fragmentary perspective view illustrating an improved fastening means.

Figure 16 is a plan view of an alternate embodiment of my invention, certain elements being disjointed for purpose of illustration.

Figure 17 is an enlarged sectional view taken on the line 17-17 of Figure 16, and

Figure 18 is a further enlarged sectional view taken along the line 1818 of Figure 17. 1

Figure 19 is an end elevation illustrating an alternativ way of connecting the collapsed and folded frame mem bers to form a convenient carrying bundle.

Figure 20 is a plan view of the embodiment illustrated in Figure 19. I

Figure 21 is an end elevation showing the collapsed and folded frame members of Figure 19 in the assembled and locked condition.

Figure 22 is an enlarged partial plan view of the hinging and locking means for joining the frame members together to form a bundle.

Figure 23 is a partial plan view with certain parts disassembled illustrating an alternative mode of connecting together the frame members to form a compact bundle.

Figure 24 is an end elevation view of the structure illustrated in Figure 23.

Figure 25 is an end elevation showing the frame members of Figure 24 in assembled and locked condition.

Figure 26 is a sectional view taken along the line 2626 of Figure 23.

In one embodiment of my invention, illustrated in Figures 1 through 15, my improved tent frame is readily erected by setting up and coupling together four corner assemblies or units indicated at A, B, C and D in Figures 1 and 2.

These units are substantially identical in construction and are interchangeable so that no error can occur in erecting the complete frame. The units comprise tubular members telescopically fitted together and pivoted at cer' tain joints so that each unit is collapsible and foldable into a compact bundle, for purpose of transportation. Figure 13 shows one of these units fully collapsed and folded while Figure 1 shows the four units fully extended and coupled together to form a complete tent frame.

Figure 2 is a plan view of the four units A, B, C and D in their extended positions but slightly disjointed at the coupling junctures to facilitate detailed description.

Referring now to Figures 1 and 2, each of the four corner assemblies or units includes a triangular base plate 10. Each of these plates has affixed thereto, as will later be described in detail, other appurtenances including a vertically disposed telescoping corner post or pole 11.

Pivotally attached, as will later be described in detail, to the upper end of each of the four corner poles are three other telescoping members 12, 13 and 14. Two of these members 12 and 13 are mounted to be horizontally disposed at right angles to each other While the third member 14 is arranged to be diagonally disposed and inclined with respect to the horizontal members.

As will now be apparent, the coupling together of the four units A, B, C and D, results in the frame structure of Figure 1. The four diagonal members 14 constitute the hip rafters of a pyramidal roof structure, the four pairs of horizontal members 12 and 13 define what may be termed the eaves ofthe roof and the four corner poles 11 serve to support the structure just described.

As will be readily understood, the roof and side-walls of the tent will be provided by a covering of canvas or the like (not shown) which covering is formed to fit over the framework and in itself forms no part of the present invention.

Referring now to Figure 8, each of the telescoping corner posts comprises a lower tubular section 15, fixed to the base plate 10, and an upper tubular section 16 slidably fitted within the lower section. Referring next to Figure the upper section 16 includes a spring pressed latch pin 17 which pin, as the two sections are manually drawn to their extended relation, snaps into a perforation 18 of the lower section to lock and retain the members in the extended position. The lower section may have other locking perforations 19, 20 and 21- adapted to be engaged by the latch whereby the overall height of the corner post may be varied if desired.

The upper section 16 has, at its lower end, a flanged or outwardly enlarged shoulder portion 16a, while the lower tubular section 15 has an inwardly extending abutment or shoulder portion 155:. By virtue of this shouldered construction, the telescopic sections cannot be extended beyond operative limits to thus become accidentally dis engaged.

As shown, the shoulder portions 15a and 16a may be formed integral with the tubular members themselves or, as will be apparent, may be provided by means of short sleeves welded or otherwise secured to the tubes.

The latch pin 17 extends through a perforation 17a in the wall of the tube and is retained therein and urged to locking position by action of a U-shaped fiat spring 22, portions of the outer ends of which abut against an opposite sidewall of the tube, the ends being slightly curled as at 23 to promote smooth operation of the latch.

The spring 22 may be afiixed to the latch pin 17 in various ways, but as here shown the latch pin is formed with a shank 24 of reduced diameter which is inserted through a perforation 25 in the spring and riveted or peened over as at 26 to secure the members together.

The design of the latch pin and spring is novel in its simplicity, no other elements being required to maintain the latchin operative relation. Release of the latch pin, as will be necessary to retract the telescoping members, requires manual operation, so that accidental collapse of the structure cannot occur.

The latch pin, the locking perforations, and the shouldered abutment construction of adjacent telescoping sections as above disclosed, comprises a typical locking ar rangement which is employed between all other adjacent telescopic sections throughout the structure, as will later be apparent.

Referring now to Figure 11, the upper end of each corner post section 16 has afiixed thereto, by means of a countersunk pin 27, a casting 28 having a plug portion 28a which fits' tightly inside the tube 16 and a tongue portion 29 which is slotted as at 30. Referring next to Figure 12, each of the castings 28 has a mating casting 31 which has a recess 32 adapted to slidably receive the tongue 29. The two castings are joined together by means of a bolt 33 which passes through suitable perforations in the casting 31- and through the slot of the tongue 29. By reason of this construction, the two castings are held in alignment as long as the tongue 29 engages within the recess 32. However, due to the slotted formation of the tongue the casting 31 may be lifted from engagementwith the tongue and thereafter turned through a one quater revolution to an alternate position as indicated by the dotted lines in Figure 12. This feature is convenient when erecting ordismantling the tent because it enables the workman to temporarily lay any or all of the corner poles flat on the ground, couple together the various horizontal and diagonal members and thereafter place the canvas covering over the frame, all parts being within convenient access to his reach. After the canvas is in place the corner poles are shifted into their vertical positions, the tongue again being engaged in the recess to lock the castings in alignment, the reverse sequence being employed for dismantling the frame.

Referring now to Figure 3 each of the castings 31 has three lugs 34, 35 and 36 which lugs have perforations 37, 33 and 39 respectively for receiving bolts 40, 41 and 42, which bolts serve to pivotally attach the horizontal and diagonal members previously mentioned. As here shown, the bolts 40, 41 and 42 mount bifurcated castings 43, 44 and 45 respectively. These castings have plug positions 43a, 44a and 45a, which in turn are perforated at 43b, 44b and 45b to receive countersunk pins 27 (see Figure 2), by means of which pins the plug portions of the castings are aflixed to the tubular members 12, 13 and 14.

The horizontal telescoping members 12 are similar in construction and operation to the telescoping corner posts 11 previously described. As will now be understood from a study of Figure 2, the members 12 comprise two telescoping sections 12a and 12b, the section 12b being perforated as at 12c to engage a spring pressed latch pin similar to the latch pin 17 previously described in conjunction with Figure 10, but here carried in the member 12a. The horizontal members 13 are again similar in construction and operation to the telescoping and locking arrangement of the members 12 as just described. Thus the members 13 each comprise two telescoping sections 13a and 13b, each of the members 13a being provided with a latch pm which is adapted to engage and lock in a perforation 13c provided in each of the sections 13b.

For the purpose of coupling together the members 12 and 13, the members 13 are provided, at their outer ends, with an extending plug 13d, which is adapted to fit tightly within the open end of section 12b of any of the extended members 12, the members 12b each having a suitable locking porforation 12d for engaging a latch pin 13c mounted within each ofthe plug members 13d.

To provide for increased length the diagonal members 14 are supplied with an extra telescoping section. Thus the members 14 each comprise three sections 14a, 14b and 140, the members 14a and 14b being provided with spring pressed latch pins similar to those previously described, which pins are arranged to engage and lock in perforations (see Figure 2) 14d and 14a, provided respectively in the sections 14b and 14c.

For purpose of coupling together the free ends of the four diagonal members 14, one of the members 14 has attached thereto a cross shaped coupling assembly generally indicated at 50 in Figures 1, 2 and 5. Referring now to Figure 5, the coupling assembly 50 comprises a casting 51 having radially extending lugs 52, 53, 54 and 5 5. Bolts 56, 57, 58 and 59 serve to pivotally attach four bifurcated'castin'gs 60, 61, 62 and 63 each of the castings being respectively provided with a plug portion 64, 65, 66 and 67. The plug portion 64, and consequently the casting 60, together with the entire coupling assembly 50, is pivotally attached to one of the members 14 by means of a bolt 70 having a nut 71.

Secured by welding, or any other suitable means, to the castings 61, 62 and 63 are internal bushings or plug members 72, 73.a nd 74 each of which is equipped with a latch pin 75 urged to locking position'by a spring 76. Referring again to Figure 2, the sleeves or plugs 72, 73 and 74 are designed to fit snugly within the open ends of the telescopic sections 146 wherein the latchpins 75 the corner posts in position if desired.

engage perforations 14 to couple the members 14 together.

Referring now to Figures 1 and 12, each of the castings 31, located at the four corners of the tent frame includes a pin 80 which pin serves to locate and also to retain the canvas covering in proper position, the canvas covering being provided with grommeted holes which are engaged by the pins 80, as well known in the art.

Referring now to Figures 5 and 7 the casting 50 which forms the apex of the tent frame structure has an elongated or slotted perforation 82. This slotted formation permits a novel means for locking the apex of the tent covering in position. As shown in Figure 7 the apex of the canvas covering is indicated at 83. By means of stitches indicated at 84, I secure to the under side of the covering a cone shaped or pyramidal shaped metal member 85, having afiixed thereto a downwardly depending rod 86 formed with a hook portion 87. It will be apparent that the hook portion 87 may readily be inserted through the slot 82 whereafter any partial rotation of the hook will cause locking thereof beneath the under surface 88 of the casting 51. This required partial rotation of the hook may be insured by attaching the metal cone 85 to the canvas covering 84 in such relation that the hook 87, together with the canvas must be twisted from their normal position before the hook can be inserted through the slot 82, whereafter the normal stress. of the covering itself will produce locking engagement between the hook 87 and the casting 82.

This feature of my invention permits that the apex connection of the canvas to the frame may be accomplished from the inside of the tent when desired. It is a feature of my tent that at the apex there is no opening in the covering for engagement with any part of the frame. This prevents possible leakage.

For the purpose of attaching the canvas covering to my tent frame and to prevent undue sagging of the canvas roof panels, I prefer to employ hooks such as 90 shown in Figure 15. As here shown, the hook is of J-shaped form. The lower portion of the hook, bent upwardly as at 91, engages one of the horizontal frame members 12 or 13. The upper end of the hook, bent downwardly as at 92, engages a strap 93 which is attached to the inner side of the canvas covering 83 by stitching 94 and 95.

As will be readily understood, a plurality of the hooks 90 and straps 93 located at suitable spaced intervals around the horizontal frame members will be required.

Throughout the foregoing description I have indicated the use of bolts or screws used either as fastening means and/ or as pivot pins. Where these elements are employed throughout the structure, I prefer that the threads of the bolts be slightly distorted so that the bolts are somewhat difficult to remove. As shown in Figure 5 the bolt or screw 58 has its threaded end 58a peened over to produce distortion. Other methods to distort the threads may readily be devised. This arrangement prevents an uninformed workman from readily dismantling the framework in an undesirable manner, but permits removal of the parts if necessary.

Referring now to Figures 8 and 9, the base plate.10 may be perforated as at 10a to accommodate an earth auger or screw 95 having a shoulder portion 96 and a square head 97. By this means the corner posts may be secured in place. The plate 10 may also have an aperture 10b located beneath the tubular member 11. This aperture permits the tube 11 to be placed over a pin or stake 99, driven into the earth for further securing In dismantling, collapsing and folding the units, the horizontal and diagonal frame members may be telescopically collapsed and then folded downwardly in parallel alignment with the corner post member. In Figure 8 the members 12 and 14 are shown in this folded position by dotted lines.

By next retracting the tube 16 into the section 15, the

pnit will then appear as shown in Figure 13, where a 6 strap or the like may be used to secure the various members in position during transit.

Referring again to Figures 8 and 9, the base plate 10 and the lower section 15 of the corner posts 11 are welded or otherwise afiixed to a boxlike framework, generally indicated at X, which comprises three angle irons 100, 101 and 102, held in spaced relation by suitable bars or plates 103, 104, 105 and 106. As indicated by broken lines in Figure 9, the corner units A, B, C and Dpreviously described may be formed in pairs having the boxlike framework of alternate units slightly smaller. Thus when the various units are collapsed and folded, as illustrated in Figure 13, the units may be placed end to end in complementary pairs and telescoped together as indicated in Figures 9 and 14.

Thus the four units of the complete tent frame structure may be reduced to two compact bundles for convenience in transportation or moving from place to place as frequently required in grave shelters.

During transportation the paired units may be retained together by various means, but for thispurpose I have indicated, in Figure 8, a spring latch 101a which is fixed to the frame member 101 as by a rivet or screw 101b. The latch is of flat spring metal and has the hook portion 101:: which may readily be moved to the dotted position shown to release an inner telescoped unit (not here shown) but indicated in Figure 9.

Throughout the drawings, I have indicated tubular telescoping members which are square in cross section. It will be readily apparent, however, that other cross sectional shapes may be employed and that-flat bars or other non-tubular members may be substituted without departing from certain aspects of my invention.

It will be apparent that by changing the lengths of proportions of the frame elements various overall sizes of the tent frame may be readily obtained.

My improved frame provides an extremely compact knock-down structure. By way of example, a tent frame such as shown in Figure l and being 15 foot square with 9 foot high sidewalls, may easily be collapsed, folded and assembled into two bundles each 7 /2 inches square by 5 feet long.

Referring now to Figures l6, l7 and 18, I have shown another embodiment of my invention wherein the frame structure provides for a tent of the ridge pole type. Figure 16 shows the structure in plan view with the various units slightly disjointed. This alternate structure comprises four corner units or assemblies A, B, C and D, each having acorner pole 10d with pivotally attached horizontal members 12, 13, and a diagonal member 14, all of which are of telescopic construction as previously disclosed.

The diagonal members of the units A and C are pivotally attached to lugs 121 formed in castings which castings have other lugs 122 and 123. The lugs 122 are pivotally attached to tubular pieces 124 and the lugs 123 are likewise attached to coupling or plug members 125 which have spring pressed latch pins 126. Thus in this modification the units A and C each include an additional 'frame element 124.

Additional frame members E and F each comprise telescoping side wall posts indicated at 130, the upper ends of which have pivotally attached two horizontal frame sections 131 and 132 and also a telescoping inclined member 133. The sidewall posts consist of the telescoping sections 135 and 136 held in extended position by means of a latch pin 137. The inclined members 133 likewise may consist of telescoping sections 138 and 139 which may be retained in extended relation by means of latch pins not shown, but carried in the members 138 to engage perforations 140 provided in each section 139.

The unit E has fixed to the upper end of its section 139,-a four way pivoted connector carrying three couplin plugs 151, 152 and 153 each of which has a spring pressed latch pin 155 adapted to lock within a' perforation 156 formed in each of the tubular sections 124 and 129 with which sections the plugs will ultimately be coupled. The horizontal members 131 may be coupled to the members 12 by means of latch pins 160 engaging locking perforations 1611. Likewise the members 13 are coupled to the sections 132 by means of other latch pins 162 which engage locking perforations 163. The members 12 and 13 may again be coupiea together by means of latch pins 130 and locking perforations 12d. The latch pins 126 engage locking perforations 14 in the sections 14.

As thus described the sections 124 serve as a ridge pole in this modification of my invention. The sections E and F may readily be collapsed and folded into a compact bundle.

Referring to Figure 17 the members 131, 132 and 133 may be folded downwardly to positions parallel to the pole 130, whereafter the section 136 is collapsed into the tube 135. This position of the various downfolded tubes is indicated by broken lines in Figure 18.

For the units E and F, I prefer an alternate arrangement of the boxlike casing as indicated at X. As shown in Figures 17 and 18 I affix the lower section 135 of the side wall posts to a square base plate 165, and by aid of U shaped bars 166 I also affix four corner irons 167. Thus by making one of the units E or F slightly smaller in cross sectional dimensions I am again enabled to telescope the boxlike frameworks into each other and the addition of units E and F requires but one extra package to be transported. Figure 18 illustrates the units E and F telescoped together, the unit F being indicated by broken lines.

Referring now to Figures 19 through 26, I have illustrated embodiments of my invention wherein the collapsed and folded corner units A, B, C and D, previously described, may be formed in a single compact bundle for convenience in transportation. By means of this arrangement the tent cover 168 may be rolled or folded and nested in the opening formed by the corner units when they are assembled into a single bundle. Thus, as seen in Figure 21, the corner units A, B, C and D when hinged together at their edges form a bundle substantially square in cross section having a central opening extending longitudinally thereof into which the tent covering may be placed and conveniently carried.

In the embodiment illustrated in Figures 19 through 22, the corner units are hingedly connected together by means of retractable hinge pins carried by each of the units for engagement with mating elements also carried by each of the units, the hinge pins of one unit adapted to engage the mating elements of the next adjacent unit in the assembly. Thus in each corner unit the angle bars 102 have the rectangular blocks 169 fixed at opposite ends thereof and extending outwardly beyond the angle bar in the manner illustrated in Figure 19. Each of the rectangular blocks 169 carries a retractable hinge pin 170 mounted thereto by means of the spring element 171. The hinge pins 170 are inwardly directed and extend parallel to but spaced from the angle bar to which they are mounted. The opposite angle bars 101 of each corner post unit carries blocks 172 having perforations 173 therein adapted to receive the hinge pins 170 when the units are placed side by side as shown in Figure 19. It will be noted that the blocks 172 are spaced inwardly from the ends of the angle bars 101 by a distance sufficient to permit them to fit inside of the blocks 169 when adjacent corner units, such as A and B, are brought together'and joined. The corner units are hinged together by placing two units side by side substantially shown in Figure 19 and then causing the hinge pins 170 to engage the blocks 172 through the perforations 173. Once connected, the corner units may be pivoted about their hinges to assume the position illustrated in Figure 21 wherein the 8 outermost blocks 172 ofcorner unit A are connected to the blocks 169 of corner unit B.

With the arrangement just described it will be evident that the corner units may be interchanged and need not occupy any particular position relative to each other excepting that a corner post 101 must always be adjacent a corner post 102 of the next successive corner unit.

The embodiment illustrated in Figure 23 through 26 of the drawings is a modification of the assembly just described. In this modification the blocks and hinge pins are replaced by the semi-circular hinge elements 174 mounted on the angle bars 101 and the mating openings 175 and 176 provided in the legs of the angle bars 102 for each element 174. The semi-circular hinge elements 174 are such that when the elements A and B are placed side-by-side as shown in Figure 24, the angle bar 101 will be adjacent the angle bar 102 with the free end of the hinge element 174 overlying or extending slightly into the opening 175 in the uppermost leg of the angle bar 102, as seen in detail in Figure 26. Then, when the corner units A and B are pivoted to bring their adjacent sides into coplanar relationship, as seen in Figure 25, the hinge element 174 will swing through the opening 175 and also through the opening 176 in the other leg of the angle bar 102, thus effectively connecting the two corner units together.

The hinge connection just described will also connect together the corner units B and C and C and D. The hinge elements 174 are, however, omitted from the angle bar 101 of corner unit A and replaced by a latch 177 which, as seen in Figure 25, is adapted to engage about an edge of the angle bar 102 of the corner unit D thus locking the assembly of corner units into the compact bundle illustrated in Figure 25.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In a corner post unit for a collapsible tent frame, a corner post made up of a plurality of telescoping parts, a base plate, a box-like framework atfixed to said base plate and adapted to support the outermost part of said corner post, a fitting on the free end of the innermost part of said post, additional frame members pivotally connected to said fitting and adapted to be collapsed together with the parts of said corner post to lie within the confines of said box-like framework.

2. Corner post units for a collapsible tent frame, each unit comprising a corner post made up of a plurality of telescoping parts, a triangular base plate, a framework affixed to said base plate, said framework comprising a plurality of supporting members extending upwardly from adjacent side edges of said base plate and suitably connected together to form a corner, the outermost part of said corner post being afiixed to said framework at the corner thereof as defined by said supporting members, a fitting on the free end of the innermost part of said corner post, a plurality of additional frame members pivotally connected to said fitting and adapted to be collapsed together with the parts of said corner post to lie within the confines of said framework.

3. The structure claimed in claim 2 wherein said corner post units are provided in pairs, the framework of one unit in said pair being slightly smaller than the other, whereby said units may be fitted together in complementary pairs, and means for connecting said pairs together in complementary relationship.

4. The structure claimed in claim 2 wherein the supporting members of said framework are three in number and comprise angle bars, one of said bars positioned at the corner of said framework, the other two angle bars being placed at the ends of the adjacent side edges of said base plate" opposite said corner, and wherein said corner post units are provided in pairs in which the framework ofone unit in said pair is slightly smaller than the other, whereby when said units are collapsed they may be placed end to end in complementary pairs and telescoped together, the said last mentioned angle bars of one of the ui'ts fitting within the complementary angle bars of the er.

5. The structure claimed in claim 2 wherein said base plate has an earth auger connected thereto for securing said corner post in place.

6. The structure claimed in claim 2 wherein said base plate has an earth auger secured thereto for securing said corner post in place, and wherein an aperture is formed in said base plate beneath the bottom edge of said outermost part of said corner post, said aperture adapted to permit the outermost part of said corner post to be placed over a stake driven into the earth for further securing said post in place.

7. In a collapsible tent frame wherein a plurality of tubular frame members are connected together, a flexible fitting for connecting said frame members together, said fitting comprising a first part having a plug portion which fits tightly inside of one of said tubular members, a tongue-like member extending in the opposite direction and adapted to extend beyond the end of said first mentioned tubular member, said tongue-like member having an elongated slot therein, and a mating part for said first mentioned part, said mating part having a recess therein adapted to slidably receive said tongue-like member, means for joining said parts together in slidable relationship, said means comprising a bolt carried by said mating part and passing through said slot, said tongue-like member and said slot being so proportioned as to permit said mating part to be lifted from engagement with said tongue and turned relative thereto without being detached therefrom, said mating part having a plurality of angularly disposed perforated lugs thereon adapted to receive bifurcated elements affixed to the ends of additional frame members to be connected to said first mentioned frame member by means of said fitting.

8. The structure claimed in claim 7 wherein said fitting serves to connect together a corner post and a plurality of frame members defining the caves of said tent, said mating part having a spike-like projection thereon adapted to pass through an opening in the tent covering.

9. A collapsible tent frame comprising four corner posts, each of said corner posts made up of a plurality of telescoping parts, a fitting at the free end of the innermost part of each post, a plurality of additional telescoping members pivotally connected to each fitting and supported by said posts, two of the additional telescoping members of each post adapted to be horizontally disposed and connected to other horizontally disposed members, another of the additional members of each post adapted to be diagonally disposed and inclined with respect to said horizontal members, a coupling carried by one of the diagonally disposed members and adapted to connect together in pyramidal fashion the diagonally disposed members of at least one other of said posts, said posts being disposed in pairs forming opposite ends of said tent frame with the diagonal members of each pair connected together by a separate coupling, and an intermediate frame section joining together said ends, said intermediate section including frame members connecting the couplings carried by said diagonally disposed members and additional horizontal members connecting the free ends of horizontally disposed frame members of said corner posts.

10. The structure of claim 9 wherein said intermediate section includes a coupling intermediate said first mentioned coupling, each of said couplings including means for locking a tent covering thereto.

11. In a collapsible tent frame construction, a plurality of corner post units each comprising a box-like framework, means connecting together said units into a compact bundle, said means comprising an element carried 10 by one of saidunits for interlocking engagement with a mating element carried by another of said units.

12. In a collapsible tent frame construction, four corner post units each comprising a box-like framework, means for hingedly connecting together said units into a compact bundle, said means comprising elements mounted along an edge of each of said units for interlocking engagement with mating elements on a diametrically opposite edge of another of said units, and mating elements so provided, said interlocking elements being adapted to engage the mating elements of the next adjacent unit when said units are fitted together in endless fashion.

13. In a collapsible tent frame construction, a plurality of corner post units each comprising a box-like framework, means for hingedly connecting together said units into a compact bundle, said means comprising semicircular hinge elements mounted along an edge of each of said units, and openings along another edge of each of said corner post units for receiving the semi-circular hinge elements of an adjacent corner post unit when a plurality of said units are placed in side by said relation and the units pivoted to bring their adjacent sides into coplanar relationship.

14. In a collapsible tent frame, a plurality of corner post units each comprising a box-like frame having angularly sides defining a corner, a corner post supported by said box-like frame at the corner thereof, said corner post having a plurality of telescoping parts the outermost of which is supported by said box-like frame, a plurality of additional telescoping members pivotally connected to the free end of the innermost parts of said corner post, said corner post units having a collapsed position in which said corner posts and said additional frame members lie wholly within the confines of said box-like frame, and an erected position in which said corner posts and said additionalframe members are extended beyond said box-like frame and the extending end of the additional frame members of the several corner post units are interconnected together to form the tent frame, said box-like frames including means for connecting together a plurality of the collapsed corner post units for carrying purposes, and means carried by said additional frame members for connecting them together when erected to form the tent frame.

15. In a collapsible tent frame, a coupling device for securing together a plurality of converging frame members comprising a body portion having radially extending elements adapted to pivotally receive the frame members, means for locking a tent covering to said coupling, said means comprising a member attached to the under side of the tent covering, said last named member having a downwardly extending rod for engagement with said coupling, said coupling having a slotted perforation extending therethrough for receiving said rod, said rod being of a length to pass through said perforation and having a hook portion at its free end which will pass through said slotted perforation when in alignment therewith, said rod being rotatable relative to said coupling, whereby said hook portion may be moved out of alignment with said slotted perforation and engaged with the under side of said coupling so as to prevent the rod from being withdrawn therefrom.

16. In a collapsible tent frame, a plurality of corner post units each comprising a box-like frame having angularly related sides defining a corner, a corner post supported by said box-like frame at the corner thereof, and additional frame members pivotally connected to the upper end of said corner post, said additional frame members having a collapsed position in which they lie within the confines of said box-like frame, and means connecting a plurality of collapsed corner post units together in a cornpact bundle, said means comprising an element carried by one of said units for interlocking engagement with a mating element carried by another of the said units.

17. In a collapsible tent frame, a plurality of corner post units each comprising a corner post made up of a plu t 9t blamin arts a as Pla e baak qrk. aflixsd o an ba e P a a d adapted o 41. Po t hs warme Part o e rn r, P st a fitt on the re en 0f nn m P f sa d P s d t a frame members pivotally connected to said fitting and adapted to be collapsed together with the parts of said corner posts to lie within the confines of said box-like framework, and means connecting a plurality of the collapsed corner post units together in a compact bundle, said means comprising an element carried by one of said units for interlocking engagement with a mating element carried by another of the said units.

18. A corner post unit for a collapsible tent frame comprising a corner post, asupporting frame for said corner post having angularly related sidesextendinglaterally beyond said corner post, a pluraiit-y of additional frame members pivotally connected to the upper end of said corner post, said additional frame members being of a. size to lie wholly within the confines of said frame and movable from a collapsed position in which they lie wholly within the confines of said frame to an erected position in which they extend outwardly in angular relation to said corner post.

19. A corner post unit for a collapsible tent frame comprising a corner post made up of a plurality of telescoping parts, a supporting frame for the outermost part of said corner post, said frame having angularly related sides extending laterally beyond said corner post, a plurality of additional frame members pivotally connected to the free end of the innermost parts of said corner post, said additional frame members being of a size to lie wholly within the confines of said frame and movable from a collapsed position in which they lie wholly within the confines of said frame to an erected position in which they extend outwardly in angular relation to said corner post.

2.9- A t qlla sible tent r m omp n a. p u l o corner post units, each ofsaid units comprising a corner post, a'supporting frame for said corner post having angularly related sides extending laterally beyond said corner post, a plurality of additional frame members pivotally connected to the upper end of said corner post, said additional frame members being of a size to lie wholly within the confines of said frame and movable from a collapsed position in which they lie wholly within the confines of said frame to an erected condition in which they extend outwardly in angular relation to said corner post, the extending ends of the additional frame members of the several corner post units being adapted to be connected together to form the tent frame, and coupling means on the ends of said additional frame members for connecting them together when in the erected condition.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 200,217 Mudgett Feb. 12, 1878 553,650 Kingsland Jan. 28, 1896 838,689 Comstock Dec. 18, 190.6 1,326,006 Sterhardt Dec. 23, 1919 1,456,918 Dudley May 29, 1923 1,515,466 Dore Nov. 11, 1924 1,526,726 Townsend Feb. 17, 1925 1,639,755 Stoll Aug. 23, 1927 1,687,722 Goldberg et al. Oct. 16, 1928 1,720,132 Kuhn July 9, 1929 2,069,479 Pluth Feb. 2, 1937 2,185,629 Dixon Jan. 2, 1940 2,368,692 Wallace Feb. 6, 1945

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US200217 *Nov 19, 1877Feb 12, 1878 Improvement in fence-posts
US553650 *Jan 28, 1896The KingsLook chain
US838689 *Jun 9, 1904Dec 18, 1906Sylvester Burt ComstockCamping-lodge.
US1326006 *Apr 30, 1919Dec 23, 1919 sterhardt
US1456918 *Aug 24, 1921May 29, 1923Dudley Benjamin BFolding tent
US1515466 *Jan 5, 1924Nov 11, 1924Dore Daniel EMetallic folding pole
US1526726 *Apr 9, 1923Feb 17, 1925Townsend Charles ACamp toilet
US1639755 *Jun 18, 1925Aug 23, 1927Stoll Mfg CompanyTent
US1687722 *Aug 27, 1927Oct 16, 1928Goldberg Jacob MPoleless tent
US1720132 *Jan 14, 1928Jul 9, 1929Kuhn Perry VTent frame
US2069479 *Mar 24, 1936Feb 2, 1937Pluth Jack LTent
US2185629 *Apr 25, 1936Jan 2, 1940Dixon John WTent structure
US2368692 *Jan 22, 1943Feb 6, 1945Wallance Donald ATent pole
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3017893 *Sep 2, 1958Jan 23, 1962Portapavilion Structures LtdCollapsible building structure
US3018858 *Aug 26, 1959Jan 30, 1962Gleason Reel CorpShelter frame
US3266503 *Jun 25, 1964Aug 16, 1966Hoiness Merlin JCollapsible shelter
US4941500 *Jul 13, 1988Jul 17, 1990Emard Michael JKnockdown canopy shelter
US4948289 *Mar 7, 1989Aug 14, 1990Dellinger Drew ESupport frame corner connector
US5511572 *Jul 25, 1994Apr 30, 1996Carter; Mark C.Collapsible shelter with flexible, collapsible canopy
US5632293 *Feb 23, 1996May 27, 1997Mark C. CarterCollapsible shelter with flexible, collapsible canopy
US5771651 *Aug 12, 1996Jun 30, 1998Shiina; TakaakiFramework for small-scale building
US5921260 *Feb 18, 1998Jul 13, 1999Carter; Mark C.Collapsible shelter with flexible collapsible canopy
US6076312 *Mar 26, 1999Jun 20, 2000Carter; Mark C.Collapsible shelter with flexible, collapsible canopy
US6089247 *Aug 12, 1998Jul 18, 2000Price; Walter L.Collapsible frame
US6138702 *Sep 17, 1998Oct 31, 2000Carter; Mark C.Resilient support for erectable shelter roof
US6240940Apr 21, 2000Jun 5, 2001Mark C. CarterCollapsible shelter with flexible, collapsible canopy
US6283136 *May 13, 1999Sep 4, 2001Fengchun ChenCollapsible tent
US6397872Oct 17, 2000Jun 4, 2002Mark C. CarterResilient support for erectable shelter roof
US6431193Apr 26, 2001Aug 13, 2002Mark C. CarterCollapsible shelter with flexible, collapsible canopy
US6591849 *Jun 21, 2000Jul 15, 2003Thomas R. SwetishFoldable frame structure
US6666223Aug 13, 2001Dec 23, 2003Walter L. PriceCollapsible frame
US6748963Aug 7, 2002Jun 15, 2004Mark C. CarterCollapsible shelter with flexible, collapsible canopy
US6772780Mar 4, 2002Aug 10, 2004Roy Justin PriceCollapsible frame
US6779538 *Sep 7, 2001Aug 24, 2004Gale Pacific LimitedErectable, collapsible shelter
US6874520 *Jul 3, 2003Apr 5, 2005Mark C. CarterErectable canopy with reinforced roof structure
US6904923 *Feb 7, 2002Jun 14, 2005Quantum Auto (Hong Kong) LimitedSunshade
US6920889Jun 10, 2004Jul 26, 2005Mark C. CarterCollapsible shelter with flexible, collapsible canopy
US6926021Feb 27, 2004Aug 9, 2005Mark C. CarterErectable canopy with reinforced roof structure
US7051745Jun 14, 2005May 30, 2006Carter Mark CErectable canopy with reinforced roof structure
US7178541Mar 15, 2005Feb 20, 2007Carter Mark CErectable canopy with reinforced roof structure
US7178542Mar 9, 2006Feb 20, 2007Carter Mark CErectable canopy with reinforced roof structure
US7219681 *Nov 12, 2002May 22, 2007Johnson Outdoors Inc.Canopy tension adjuster
US7252108 *Jul 25, 2005Aug 7, 2007Carter Mark CCollapsible shelter with flexible, collapsible canopy
US7363933 *Dec 22, 2006Apr 29, 2008Carter Mark CErectable canopy with reinforced roof structure
US7389785 *Apr 15, 2005Jun 24, 2008Loudermilk William AStructural support assembly
US7448401Dec 22, 2006Nov 11, 2008Carter Mark CErectable canopy with reinforced roof structure
US7530364Mar 6, 2008May 12, 2009Carter Mark CErectable canopy with reinforced roof structure
US7571737 *Aug 1, 2007Aug 11, 2009Jeongwoo JangJoint structure of fold type tent frame
US7624747Oct 6, 2008Dec 1, 2009Carter Mark CErectable canopy with reinforced roof structure
US7640943Jun 28, 2007Jan 5, 2010Mark C CarterCollapsible shelter with flexible, collapsible canopy
US7735504 *Dec 16, 2008Jun 15, 2010Carter Mark CErectable shelter with collapsible central roof support
US7735505May 11, 2009Jun 15, 2010Carter Mark CErectable canopy with reinforced roof structure
US7845365Oct 13, 2009Dec 7, 2010Carter Mark CErectable canopy with reinforced roof structure
US7891369Dec 9, 2009Feb 22, 2011Carter Mark CCollapsible shelter with flexible, collapsible canopy
US7921864Jun 2, 2010Apr 12, 2011Carter Mark CErectable shelter with collapsible central roof support
US8056573 *Mar 11, 2009Nov 15, 2011Foldable Stuff, LlcFreestanding collapsible shelter
US8215326 *Jul 10, 2007Jul 10, 2012Hkd International (Hk) LimitedAdjustable support assembly for a collapsible canopy
US8662096 *Aug 18, 2011Mar 4, 2014Vitabri, Societe AnonymeFolding structure that can be unfolded and refolded quickly
US8746637 *Feb 11, 2010Jun 10, 2014Chun-Sheng LiuFoldable frame
US20110192942 *Feb 11, 2010Aug 11, 2011Chun-Sheng LiuFoldable Frame
US20120006373 *Aug 18, 2011Jan 12, 2012Vitabri, Societe AnonymeFolding structure that can be unfolded and refolded quickly
US20140096805 *Oct 5, 2012Apr 10, 2014Paul J. SilvaFrame-mounted lighting for a collapsible structure
WO1998027296A1 *Dec 16, 1997Jun 25, 1998Soto Rojas Adolfo RafaelSelf-supporting foldable structure
WO2014094609A1 *Dec 18, 2013Jun 26, 2014Campvalley (Xiamen) Co., LtdTent screen
Classifications
U.S. Classification135/140, 135/904, 135/147
International ClassificationE04H15/46
Cooperative ClassificationE04H15/46, Y10S135/904
European ClassificationE04H15/46