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Publication numberUS2723778 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 15, 1955
Filing dateMar 6, 1953
Priority dateMar 6, 1953
Publication numberUS 2723778 A, US 2723778A, US-A-2723778, US2723778 A, US2723778A
InventorsWilliam Rabak
Original AssigneeWilliam Rabak
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sealed container with lock and leverage opening tab
US 2723778 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 15, 1955 w. RABAK SEALED CONTAINER WITH LOCK AND LEVERAGE OPENING TAB Filed March 6 1953 INVENTOR. WILLIAM RABAK BY ATTORNEYS United States Patent SEALED CONTAINER WITH LOCK AND LEVERAGE OPENING TAB William Rabak, El Cerrito, Calif.

Application March 6, 1953, Serial No. 340,707

2 Claims. (Cl. 220-47) An object of my invention is to provide a sealed container with lock and leverage opening tab which may be used in connection with my patent on a sealed container No. 2,522,961, issued Septemberl9, 1950. In the above patent I show a sealed container having a cover with an arcuate flap that has been die cut in the cover. The arcuate flap is placed under a tensionso that it will spring into an open position as soon as the sealing compound, extending along the die cut, is softened by heat.

The purpose of the above patented device is to provide a sealed container that will be automatically opened when the container is placed in an oven or is otherwise heated to warm the can contents prior to eating thereof.

In the present invention I provide a lock and leverage opening tab and connect this to the arcuate flap of the sealed container cover in such a manner that the locklever will act as an auxiliary fastening means between the arcuate flap and the cover, and in addition, will act as an arcuate flap opening means for the sealed container. The initial swinging of the lock and leverage opening tab into open position will break the sealed compound thathas been applied to the die-cut line for sealing this cut. The sealed compound is not only severed by the initial swinging of the tab, but the tab in addition is used for swinging the arcuate flap into full open position.

The arcuate flap can be made large with reference to the cover of the sealed container so that a full opening to the civilian. When the container is used for the military, it enables the ready opening of the container without the need of special opening devices and the container can be readily opened under adverse conditions, such as extreme cold, complete darkness, or when it is necessary to use gloved or mittened hands. The device will not interfere with the electronic sterilization of the container contents.

Other objects and advantages will appear in the following specification, and the novel features of the device will be particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

My invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing forming a part of this application, in which:

Figure 1 is a top plan view of a sealed container cover illustrating the interrupted severance line prior to placing the lock and leverage opening tab in position;

Figure 2 is a view similar to Figure 1 and shows the lock and leverage opening tab in position;

Figure 3 is a bottom plan view of the cover shown attached to a container and the die-cut flap has been sealed with a sealing compound applied to the under surface of the cover and along a path that follows the interrupted severance line;

of the flap will expose practically the entire. top of the contents of the container. This large type of arcuate flap is used when the container holds solid material. A smaller arcuate flap can be die-cut in the sealed container cover and such a flap can be ofiset with respect tothe center of the cover. The use of a smaller arcuate flap is made when the container carries a liquid that is to be dispensed.

An object of the present invention is to increase the scope of usefulness of standard sealed containers and permit utilization of present standard factory equipment for the filling, closing and handling of the containers. The modification of the present type hermetically sealable container is made inexpensive because the container cover need only be die-cut to form an arcuate flap of the desired size and then the lock and leverage opening tab can be added for holding the arcuate flap in closed position. The device can be used on double seamed tin cans and can also be used on glass or other airtight containers where a metal cover is used.

Such containers equipped with my invention are transformed into modernized units that are more desirable for holding foods, etc. The invention contemplates the combining of the essential protective characteristics of the standard hermetically scalable container with a unique easy opening feature that eliminates the necessity for using special opening implements. In fact the sealed containers equippedwith my opening'feature can be opened with a twist of the wrist andthis can be accomplished safely, cleanly and instantly. I

The device provides a container of unusual convenience Figure 4 is a vertical section through a portion of a sealed container and shows the lock and leverage opening tab in position; and

Figure 5 illustrates how the lock and leverage opening tab can be raised for breaking the seal and for opening the arcuate flap.

While I have shown only the preferred form of my invention, it should be understood that various changes or modifications may be made within the scope of the appended claims without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. I

In carrying out my invention I make use of a standard sealed container indicated generally at A in Figure 4. The container has a metal cover shown at B. The cover B is secured to the container wall A by the usual double seaming and since this type of closure forms no part of my invention, I do not illustrate the double seaming. The cover B could be one that has a cylindrical flange with threads on it for securing the cover to a glass jar that has a threaded neck for receiving the cover.

In Figure l, I show the cover B provided with an arcuate die-cut, or an interrupted severance line, that is concentric with the periphery of the cover and is nearly as large as the diameter of the cover. It is obvious that the interrupted severance line 1 can be of any shape desired and of a size so, long as it will lie within the'area of the cover. I have found that a large arcuate die-cut of the type shown in Figure 1 should be used for providing a large arcuate flap where solid pack material is placed within the sealed container. Such an arcuate die-cut provides a large flap that is almost the same size as the diameter of the cover itself.

Where it is desired to use the sealed container for liquids, a small offset arcuate flap can be die-cut in the cover. This smaller ofiset'arcuate flap has not been illustrated in the drawing. The container lids or covers B are preferably die-cut at 1 during the manufacture of the covers and these die-cuts are slightly less than a complete circle. It is for this reason that I refer to the cut as an interrupted severance line.

The die-cut 1 forms an arcuate flap B1. It will be noted from Figure 1 that a slot 2 is formed in the cover B at a point in the arcuate die-cut line 1 which is substantially opposite fromthe uncut portion or hinge 3 of the cover. The uncut portion 3 will constitute a hinge during the swinging of the arcuate flap into open position and maybe made of any length desired. The slot 2 can b'e'formed by cutting away the material of the cover or the portion of the cover forming the slot can be bent under the arcuate flap B1 so as to lie against the under surface of the flap and thus provide a slight reinforcement for the arcuate flap at this point.

A combined lock and opening tab indicated generally at C is applied to the cover and has a portion passing through the slot 2. The particular shape of the locklever or tab C is shown in Figures 2, 3 and 4. The combined lock and opening tab C has a handle portion 4 and an integral Z-shaped portion indicated generally at C1. This Z-shaped portion has a pointed end 5, see Figure 3, that underlies the uncut portion or flange 6 of the cover B. This uncut portion in reality forms a flange 6 that lies in the same plane as the arcuate flap B1 when the flap is in closed position. The pointed end is connected to the handle 4 of the lock-lever C by an intermediate portion 7 that forms a part of the 2, indicated at C1. In other words, the pointed end 5 is connected to the intermediate portion 7 by a fold 8 and the intermediate portion 7 in turn is connected to the handle 4 by a second fold 9.

Figure 4 clearly shows how the inner faces of the fold 8 face and receive the flange 6 so that the pointed end 5 contacts with the under surface 6:: of the flange while the intermediate portion 7 contacts with the upper surface 6b of the same flange. Most can covers are provided with one or more circular ribbed portions and I have shown one of these at 10 in Figure 4. The fold 9 of the lock-lever C, has its inner faces receiving the arcuate flap B1. The intermediate portion 7 bears against the under surface 11 of the flap B1, while the handle 4 bears against the upper surface 12 of the arcuate flap. The intermediate portion 7 passes through the slot 2.

It will be seen from this construction that the integral lock and opening tab C is inserted in the line of the diecut 1 and is positioned so as to be received in the slot 2. When the lock-lever C is in place, it will secure the arcuate flap B1 in position so that it will lie flush with the remaining wall 6 of the cover B. The lock-lever C assures against rupture of the sealed line of cut 1 during the machine closing, handling and shipping of the container A, and it will also prevent the accidental opening of the arcuate flap B1 due to any pressure from within or without the container.

In actual practice, the under surface of the handle 4 will contact with the upper surface 12 of the arcuate flap B1. The Z-shaped portion C1 will provide novel means for anchoring the lock-lever to the flange 6 of the cover and also anchoring the lock-lever to the arcuate flap B1. It is this double lock feature which holds the lock-lever as well as the flap in position.

In Figure 3 I show the under side of the cover B provided with a sealing compound indicated generally at D. The sealing compound may be applied to the entire under surface of the cover but I have found that it is better to apply the compound along the arcuate dieout line 1 so that the compound will extend a slight distance beyond each side of the line. The sealing compound D also encloses the pointed end 5 of the combination lock and opening tab C. The sealing compound will close the slot 2 and in fact it will seal the entire arcuate die-cut 1 or the interrupted severance line. The sealing compound secures the lock-level C in position. It is possible to apply the sealing compound to the outer surface of the cover, but from the manufacturing stand point, it is better to apply the sealing compound to the under surface of the cover. The sealing may be accomplished by spraying, flowing or dipping and any suitable sealing compound may be used.

The combination lock and opening tab C is simple in construction and is preferably made from a thin hardened metal. A wire could be used with the ends of the wire being flattened. The length of the lever is determined by the diameter of the die-cut flap B1. Where small die-cut flaps are used for the emptying of liquid from the container, the lever need not be more than three-quarters of an inch long. For large die-cut flaps of the type shown in Figure l, where solid packs are used in the can or container, the lever is preferably made one and one-half inches long. I do not wish to be confined to any exact size or length for the arcuate diecut 1 or interrupted severance line.

It will be noted from Figure 4 that the Z-shaped portion C1 of the lever provides two oppositely opening gripping portions for receiving the adjacent edges of the die-cut flap B1 and the flange 6 of the cover B. The lock-lever C prevents the rupture of the sealing compound D during the mechanical closing of the container where the double seaming of the lid or cover is accomplished in the usual manner. Furthermore, the lock-lever prevents the rupture of the sealing compound during the handling and shipping of the container and will overcome any stresses due to internal or external pressures.

The lock-lever C provides a leverage action at two fulcrum points during the opening of the flap B1. In Figure 5 I show the handle 4 raised into an angular position with respect to the cover B. The raising of the handle 4 is accomplished by moving it in the direction of the arrow a in Figure 4. During this lifting movement, the Z-shaped portion C1 will fulcrum on the outer surface of the fold 9. Of course the initial upper move ment of the handle 4 will cause the sealing compound D to shear as shown in Figure 5 and this fracture will extend parallel to the interrupted severance line 1 and from end to end of the line because the lifting movement of the handle 4 will tend to swing the arcuate flap B1 upwardly as shown in Figure 5. The flap B1 will swing about the hinged or unsevered portion 3, clearly shown in Figures 1, 2 and 3.

The other point of fulcrum of the Z-shaped portion C1 is about the outer surface of the other fold 8 and this fold will slide along the under surface 12 of the arcuate flap B1. It will therefore be seen that the two points of fulcrum about which the Z portion C1 swings as the lever handle 4 is lifted, will cause the immediate breaking of the seal along the entire line of the die-cut l. The arcuate flap 131 will snap open at once as indicated in Figure 5 and then the handle 4 can be moved bodily in the direction of the arrow b for swinging the flap B1 into full open position. During this movement, the arcuate edge of the flap will still remain in the jawlike portion formed adjacent to the inner surface of the fold 9. The lock-lever C provides a unique means for opening the hermetically sealed rigid containers. The opening of the arcuate fiap B]. can be accomplished quickly and with a minimum of effort.

Different types of sealing compounds can be used for sealing the die-cut line 1 and for holding the tab C. Where dried foods are to be canned, such as dried milk and other powders, etc., fried noodles, french fried potatoes, dehydrated soups, dried fruits, etc., the sealing compounds should preferably consist of certain rubberbearing materials; also vinyl compounds such as vinyl butyrate and others, polyamides and polyamide compositions, certain lacquers, cellulose derivatives, etc. Where non-aqueous liquids are to be canned, such as edible oils, lubricating oils, linseed oil, varnishes, paints, etc., the sealing compound should preferably consist of appropriate materials such as shellac compositions, polyamide compositions, synthetic thermoplastics, certain lacquers, vinyl butyrate and other vinyl compositions, etc. When canning aqueous liquids, such as beer, frozen coffee, fountain syrups, toppings, fruit juices, water base paints, nutritive solutions for medical use, etc., a rubber bearing sealing compound is employed, or polyamide resins, certain lacquers, cellulose derivatives, vinyl compounds, etc., could be used.

In the canning of solid and semisolid frozen foods, such as sirup packed frozen fruits, dry frozen (loose packed) foods, pre-cooked frozen foods, etc., a plasticized microcrystalline parafline is used. It is also possible to use plasticized lacquers, polyamide resins and other synthetics which are not too brittle at below freezing temperatures. When liquid frozen foods, such as frozen juices and juice concentrates are placed in containers, the containers are sealed with the same kind of sealing compounds as used in solid and semisolid frozen food containers.

Where pharmaceuticals, tobaccos and confections are to be protectively packaged; also many hygroscopic (moisture absorbing) non-food commodities which corrode, oxidize or otherwise become impaired upon contact with the atmosphere, the sealing materials selected should have the same characteristics as those mentioned under dried foods.

The die-cutting, insertion of the Z lock and leverage opening tab and sealing of the segmented container ends is completed by the container manufacturer. The modified ends are shipped ready for use with conventional factory closing and handling equipment.

I claim:

1. The combination with a container having a wall with an interrupted severance line therein with contacting edges and forming a flap integrally hinged to said wall; of a non-bendable combined lock and opening tab having a handle and a double folded, Z-shaped portion at one end with the two folds facing in opposite directions, the inner surfaces adjacent to one fold contacting with the inner and outer surfaces of the wall at points adjacent to the severance line; the inner surfaces adjacent to the other oppositely facing fold contacting with the inner and outer surfaces of the flap at points adjacent to the severance line for holding the flap in the same plane as the wall; and a sealing compound coating overlying the surface of the said wall adjacent to the severance line for sealing the severance line; the coating also overlying a portion of the combined lock and opening tab for securing it in place; the outer surfaces of the two folds acting as fulcrums when the tab is lifted into an angular position with respect to the wall by the handle, for shearing the sealing compound adjacent to the line of severance and for lifting the flap with respect to the wall when the tab is moved for inclining the flap with respect to the wall; the fold that contacts with the flap continuing to grip the flap as the tab is moved for swinging the flap into open position.

2. A container having an interrupted severance line with contacting edges through a wall of said container and forming a flap integrally hinged to said wall; a nonbendable combined lock and opening tab having a handle and a Z-shaped portion formed from two folds that face in opposite directions; the inner surface of one fold contacting with the inner and outer surfaces of the Wall while the inner surface of the other fold contacts with the inner and outer surfaces of the flap; the contacting of the two folds with the wall and flap being accomplished at points adjacent to the same portion of the severance line for holding both the wall and the flap in the same plane; and a sealing compound sealing the severance line and securing the combined lock and opening tab in place; the handle lying close to the Wall so as not to interfere with the normal use of the container; the sealing compound being adapted to shear adjacent to the severance line when the combined lock and opening tab is swung for opening the flap with respect to the wall; the outer surface of one of the folds fulcruming on the container Wall during this movement, and the outer surface of the other fold fulcruming on the flap during the same movement.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 648,807 Smith May 1, 1900 1,159,514 McColl Nov. 9, 1915 2,522,961 Rabak Sept. 19, 1950

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US648807 *Dec 21, 1899May 1, 1900David W LanaganLabel-cutter and cover-lifter.
US1159514 *Jan 31, 1910Nov 9, 1915American Key Can CompanyRoll-top receptacle.
US2522961 *Oct 24, 1945Sep 19, 1950William RabakSealed container
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3021976 *Sep 24, 1959Feb 20, 1962Nat Can CorpContainer
US3261497 *Mar 2, 1964Jul 19, 1966Nat Can CorpCan
US3361291 *Jun 14, 1965Jan 2, 1968Ermal C. FrazeThin walled easy opening can
US3447713 *Nov 3, 1967Jun 3, 1969Continental Can CoScore shield and anti-implosion ring
US3454185 *Aug 31, 1967Jul 8, 1969Fraze Ermal CEasy opening can end
US3490643 *Jan 22, 1968Jan 20, 1970Dorn Co VFull opening container end
US3784048 *Sep 9, 1970Jan 8, 1974Dorn Co VContainers for corrosive food products
US3952912 *Oct 11, 1974Apr 27, 1976Walter Merton PerryContainer with attached closure
US3967749 *May 29, 1973Jul 6, 1976Continental Can Company, Inc.Easy opening end closure for a container and method of making the same
DE2008181A1 *Feb 21, 1970Nov 26, 1970 Tear open can lid with plastisol ring to - prevent sharp edges
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/268, 220/274
Cooperative ClassificationB65D17/163
European ClassificationB65D17/16B1