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Publication numberUS2725622 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 6, 1955
Filing dateNov 16, 1954
Priority dateNov 16, 1954
Publication numberUS 2725622 A, US 2725622A, US-A-2725622, US2725622 A, US2725622A
InventorsGeier George H
Original AssigneeGeier George H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Can-piercing mechanism
US 2725622 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 6, 1955 G. H. GEIER 2,725,622

CAN-PIERCING MECHANISM Filed Nov. 1e, 1954 2 sheets-sheet 1 ff' CT Z l 3.9 4e/4&5'

glili EN TOR.

6607196 Geier BY M a Dec. 6, 1955 G. H. GEIER 2,725,622

CAN-PIERCING MECHANISM Filed Nov. 16, 1954 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Fler. 6

IN VEN TOR.

FI 4 www ZQZZg United States Patent @dice 2,725,622 `Patented Dec. 6, 1955 CAN-PIERCING MECHANISM George H. Geier, Evansville, Ind. Application November 16, 1954, Serial No. 469,115

7 Claims. (Cl. 30-6.1)

This invention 'relates to a mechanism for creating a pour opening and a vent opening inthe top of a 'can containing beverage or other material in 'a iluid state.

Devices commonly available at the present time for making an opening in a can are generally lof two kinds; (.1.) the small hand type which consists merely of a strip of steel having a bent pointed end and a small hook in proximity to the pointed fend and (2) a stand on which is mounted a pivoted lever having a can-piercing device secured thereto, and -a small platform ldisposed under the lever for supporting the can to be opened. The first type is widely used in households Where relatively few cans are to be opened at a time. The second type is used generally where beverages are sold in 'cans and consumed at lthe point of sale. Because ofthe large number of cans which may require opening .in a relatively short time, the ease and'convenience provided bythe latter variety is much desired.

In order 'to pour the contents of a can readily from an opening in the top thereof, 'a second 'opening must be provided above the pour opening to admit air to replace the poured contents. An apparatus adapted to provide openings in the can must therefore be of such character as to form two openings at substantially diametrically opposed points in the .top `of the can. Such openings may, of course, be formed individually by apparatus of the second type by depressing the lever once to 'form the first opening, then raising the lever and turning the can 180 and depressing the lever again.

In the can-puncturing machines heretofore available wherein a pivoted lever is used, the cutting mechanism must necessarily be swung in an arc about 'the pivot of the lever. This results in a transverse movement of the cutting mechanism across the `top of the can for 'which 'the cutting mechanism generally is not designed. The result is a tearing of the can rather Vthan a clean cut; the tearing, in addition to requiring more force than is necessary, also leaving a jagged opening which may be unsafe to use.

It is an object of this invention to provide a can-punching and opening device which, although employing a lever for operating the can-opening mechanism, nevertheless performs the can-opening function by a purely axial movement of the can-opening mechanism relative to the axis ofthe can.

Another object of this invention is to provide a canopening mechanism which will form two openings simultaneously in the top of 'a can, one opening being the pour opening and the other the vent opening, both openings being `formed `by a purely axial movement of the mechanism relative to the axis of the can.

A further object of this invention lis the provision ofa can-opening mechanism which is adaptable for use with the different sizes of can commonly encountered in the establishment where the mechanism is used.

A more specific object of this invention is the provision of a can-opening mechanism which takes maximum -advantage of molding techniques to reduce the machining 2 operations required in its formation and consequently is inexpensive to make.

These and other objects of this invention will become apparent from the following detailed description when taken together with the accompanying drawings in which:

Fig. l is a side elevational view, partly in section, of a preferred embodiment of this invention;

Fig. 2 is a side elevational view of the device of Fig. 1 showing itin a can-piercing position;

Fig. 3 is an exploded three-quarter side elevational view in perspective of the device of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a plan view in section of the device of Fig. 1, the section being taken substantially along the line 4-4 of Fig. l;

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary side elevational view in section of the can-piercing or punching mechanism and its support;

Fig. 6 is a side elevational View, partly in section, of a modification of the can piercing device; and

Fig. 7 is a plan View in section of the device of Fig. 6, the section being taken substantially along the line 7-7 of Fig. 6.

Referring now to the drawings for a detailed description of the invention and particularly to Fig. l, the embodiment there shown is comprised of a frame 10 having a base 11, and an upright post 12 disposed near the lefthand edge of base 11 as viewed in Fig. l and extending upwardly from base 11 well above the tallest can to be opened or pierced by the device. A can 13 is shown in dotted outline in the position it would occupy in the device, the can chosen for illustration being of a medium size such as is commonly used 'for canned beverages.

Post 12 is preferably of rectangular cross section and hollow, having a front wall 14 `(Fig. 3), side walls 1'5 and 16 and a rear wall 17. Front and rear walls 14 and 17 are slotted from the top as shown at 18 and 19, respectively, for a distance terminating just below the top of can 13, the slots being of such width as to leave portions of walls 14 and 17 adjacent side walls 15 and 16 and thus forming vertical channels.

Base 11 and post 12 are preferably made as a single casting, the juncture between the post and base being broadened to form webs 20 and 21. Said webs slope forwardly and outwardly from post 12 to form a circular wall 22 which centers and locates a can in the device. A horizontal platform 23 is formed integrally with base 11 and extends outwardly from wall 22 to provide the support for the can during the piercing operation. Base 11 extends forwardly from platform 23 in the form of arms 24, 25 a sufficient distance to prevent tipping ofthe device 'when it is in use.

The means used to perforate can 13 is a vertically reciprocable punch 26 comprised of a plate of generally circular outline having a downwardly extending skirt or ange 27 disposed around its periphery and of a depth which is sulicient to receive the top of a can at the end of a piercing operation. The skirt serves to reinforce or stiffen the plate and also acts as a 'shield in the event the contents of the can squirt upwardly from the openings made by the punch.

On the underside of punch l26 .is a curved and pointed blade 28 the function of which is to form the pouring opening in the top 29 of the can 13. lThe cylindrical .rear surface 30 of blade 28 is substantially parallel with the vertical extension of the sides of can 13, so that the only part of blade 28 which contacts the 'top 29 of can '13 is the curved cutting edge 31 of the blade as the blade is moved downwardly toward the vrcan, or upwardly to withdraw the blade from the can. It is a feature of this invention that the mechanism is so constructed as to guide blade 28 in a manner to constrain it to move ina line parallel with the axis of can 13. 7

The air vent is formed by a needle 32 disposed to the right of blade 23 as viewed in Fig. 1 and extending downwardly from the bottom surface of punch 26. The axis of needle 32 is substantially parallel with the axis of can 13. Needle 32 and blade 28 may be of case-hardened steel, or steel which has been hardened by other methods, and may be secured to blade 28 by brazing, welding, riveting or otherwise.

Punch 26 is supported above platform 23 by a guide bar 33 which is of rectangular cross section and of such dimension as to fit relatively closely within the confines of the channels formed by sides 15 and 16 adjacent slots 18 and 19. Guide bar 33 may thus move vertically in post 12 along an axis parallel to the axis of can 13 and is restrained from turning in the post by the rectangular configuration of the guide bar and the opening in the post therefor. A stud 34 is welded or otherwise secured to the upper surface of punch 26 and extends to the left, as viewed in Fig. l', through an opening 35 in the upper re* gion of guide bar 33 to the opposite side thereof. A pair of shoulders 36 on either side of stud 34 serve as an abutment to locate the stud relative to the guide bar, and a nut 37 locks the stud to the bar. Shoulders 36 are retained in a transverse groove 38a on the punch side of guide bar 33 and serve to prevent rotation of the stud about its own axis after the stud has been assembled on the guide bar and to maintain blade 28 and needle 32 in vertical position.

The punch and guide bar assembly is continuously urged upwardly relative to post 12 by a coil spring 3S disposed in the bottom of the post 12 and serving to support the guide bar 33. As will be explained hereinafter, the spring 38 is continuously slightly in compression to make certain that the punch and its operating assembly are always raised above the top of the tallest can to which the device may be applied.

The means for operating punch 26 is comprised of a lever 39 having a broadened and curved palm engaging free end 40 and a transverse opening 41 at its other end, said transverse opening being engaged by a pivot pin 42 in the form of a bolt having a head 43 at one end, and threads 44 at the other end adapted to be engaged by a nut 45. Pivot pin 42 is adapted to pass through a selected one of a pair of aligned openings 46, 47 and 48 in the sides 15 and 16 of post 12. The selection of the pair of openings to be used depends upon the height of the can to be pierced or opened. Obviously, as many openings as desired may be provided in post 12. The width and thickness of lever 39 are selected to give maximum strength and rigidity consistent with low cost.

As may be apparent from the description thus far, punch 26 is adapted to move in a purely vertical direction., that is, in a rectilinear path, whereas lever 39 is adapted to move solely in a curvilinear path. The means for translating the curvilinear motion of the lever to rectilinear movement of the punch 26 comprises a cam 49 consisting of a plate which may be cast integrally with lever 39 and which extends downwardly therefrom toward the upper surface of punch 26. The edge S of cam 49 is adapted to bear against the upper surface 51 of stud 34, said upper surface being preferably iiattened and made somewhat broader than the width of edge Sil to insure contact between surface 51 and said edge. Alternatively, cam 49 may be made of steel the edge 50 of which has been hard ened to withstand the operating forces of the device.

Referring now to Fig. 1, it may be observed that spring 38 -will urge guide bar 33 upward until it contacts the pivoted end of lever 39, at which location the blade 28 and needle 32 are above the surface of the can 13 to be pierced thereby. The eccentrically supported weight of lever 39 will cause the lever to tend to fall so that edge 50 of cam 49 will bear against surface 51 and the device will be in readiness for immediate operation. To puncture a can, the can is merely placed on platform 23 and 4 pushed against surface 22, after which lever 39 is pressed by pushing downward on end 40.

The rotary motion of lever 39 is translated into rectilinear movement of punch 26 toward can 13 by cam 50 and this movement continues until blade 28 and needle 32 have entered and made the desired openings in the top of the can. Punch 26 is automatically withdrawn from the can when pressure on lever 39 is released, spring 38 serving to push guide bar 33 and punch 26 upwardly, the latter carrying with it blade 28 and needle 32, and also raising lever 39 to its upper position as shown in Fig. l. It may be observed that both blade 28 and needle 32 do not have any motion of translation transversely of the top of can 13, either during the punching or piercing operation, or during the motion of withdrawal from the can, and hence the openings made by these elements are clean and sharp and are undisturbed after they are made. It may be seen also that cam edge 56 may be shaped to provide a desired mechanical advantage at any point along the movement of the blade 28 and needle 32 through the top of can 13.l Thus the movement of punch 26 may be made relatively rapid initially until contact is established between can 13, blade 28 and needle 32, and then less rapid, but with greater leverage for multiplication of force as these elements pass through the top of the can.

The modification shown in Figs. 6 and 7 differs from the one just described in that a different means is used to adjust the height of the punch relative to the base of the device. In these figures there is shown a base 52 having a platform 53 on which a can 13 may be mounted, and a hollow rectangular post 54 disposed to the left of the base as viewed in Fig. 6, the opening 55 in the post being rectangular in cross section. A standard 56 of rectangular cross section is received in opening 55 and is adapted to assume different positions therein vertically along the axis of said opening 55. A thumb screw 57 serves to lock standard 56 in any selected position in opening 55.

Standard S6 is hollow, the opening 59 therein being substantially rectangular to receive a guide bar 58 of corresponding rectangular cross section. Guide bar 58 is adapted to reciprocate within the opening 59 in standard 56. A spring 60 is compressed between abutment 61 disposed transversely of the opening 59 and lthe end 62 of an opening in the lower end of guide bar 58, such that said guide bar 58 is continuously urged toward the upper end of standard 56 as viewed in Fig. 6. Punch 26 may be secured by welding or otherwise to a plate 63 secured to, or integral with, the upper end of guide bar 58 and movable therewith. Lever 39 is pivoted to the upper end of standard 56 so that edge 50 of cam 49 bears against the upper surface of plate 63 to convert the curvilinear movement of the cam into rectilinear movement of punch 26 as described with reference to Figs. 1 to 3 above.

In the Figs. 6 and 7 modification, the operation of the device is precisely the same as the operation of the device shown in Figs. l to 4 inclusive. It may be observed, however, that since spring 60 is carried by standard 56, the

force of the spring remains unchanged regardless of the initial height of punch 26 above platform 53. A more uniform action is therefore obtained for different sized cans. Moreover, the adjustment of the device for a different size can is eiected more readily in the Figs. 6 and 7 form than in the Figs. 1 to 4 form and hence the Fig. 6 form is particularly well suited to an establishment where the sizes of cans to be opened are continually changing.

The construction of both forms requires a minimum of machining operations and hence lends itself to molding and casting techniques. Such construction also results in a most economical design.

It is understood that the foregoing description is merely illustrative of preferred embodiments of this invention and that the scope of the invention is not to be limited thereto but is to be determined by the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A can-piercing device comprising a base, a hollow post supported by the base, a support for a can to be pierced, a guide bar reciprocable in the post toward and away from the can support, a punch connected to the bar and movable therewith, a lever pivoted to the post, means interposed between the lever and punch for translating curvilinear movement of the lever to rectilinear movement of the punch, piercing means on the punch adapted to pierce the can upon movement of the punch toward the can, a lixed abutment within the post, and resilient means interposed between the xed abutment and the guide bar for continuously urging the bar and punch in a direction away from the can.

2. A can-piercing device comprising a base, a hollow post supported by the base, a support for a can to be pierced, a guide bar reciprocable in the post toward and away from the can support, a plate secured to the guide bar and extending over the support, piercing means secured to the plate and extending toward the support, a lever pivoted to the post, means interposed between the lever and plate for translating curvilinear movement of the leverto rectilinear movement of the punch, a fixed abutment within the post, and resilient means interposed between the xed abutment and the guide bar for continuously urging the bar and plate in a direction away from the support.

3. A can-piercing device comprising a base, a hollow post supported by the base, a support for a can to be pierced, a guide bar reciprocable in the post toward and away from the can support, a punch connected to the bar and movable therewith, a lever pivoted to the post, cam means interposed between the lever and punch for translating curvilinear movement of the lever to rectilinear movement of the punch, piercing means on the punch adapted to pierce the can upon movement of the punch toward the can, a xed abutment within the post, and resilient means interposed between the xed abutment and the guide bar for continuously urging the bar and punch in a direction away from the can.

4. A can-piercing device comprising a base, a hollow post supported by the base, said post being substantially rectangular in cross section and having slots extending downwardly from the top thereof on opposed sides of the post, a support for a can to be pierced, a guide bar reciprocable in the post past the slots toward and away from the support, a punch connected to the bar and extending through one of said slots over the can support and movable with the bar, a lever pivoted to the post, means interposed between the lever and punch for translating curvilinear movement of the lever to rectilinear movement of the punch, piercing means on the punch adapted to pierce the can upon movement of the punch toward the can, a fixed abutment on the support, and resilient means interposed between the fixed abutment and the guide bar for continuously urging the bar and punch in a direction away from the can.

5. A can-piercing device comprising a base, a hollow post supported by the base, a support on the base for a can to be pierced, said post having a substantially rectangular cross section and having slots extending downwardly from the top thereof in opposite sides of the post, a guide bar of a cross section corresponding to the cross section of the hollow post and reciprocable in said post toward and away from the can support, a punch, a stud secured to the punch, said bar having a transverse opening therethrough to receive said stud, a shoulder on said stud abutting on the guide bar, means for clamping the stud to the guide bar, said stud having a substantially flat surface disposed in a plane extending transversely of the guide bar, a lever pivoted to the post, cam means on the lever and adapted to contact the flat surface on the stud for translating curvilinear movement of the lever to rectilinear movement of the punch, piercing means on the punch extending toward the support for the can and adapted to pierce the can upon movement of the punch toward the can, a xed abutment on the support, and resilient means interposed between the fixed abutment and the guide bar for continuously urging the bar and punch in a direction away from the can.

6. A can-piercing device as described in claim 5, said guide bar having a transverse groove in which is received the shoulder of the stud, and said shoulder being elongated in a direction corresponding with the axis of the groove whereby said punch is prevented from rotating relative to the guide bar.

7. A can-piercing device as described in claim 5, said lever being pivoted to the post above the guide bar and serving to limit the movement of the guide bar in a direction away from the support.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 146,355 Paillard et al. Jan. 13, 1874 198,959 Williams Jan. 8, 1878 299,379 Greenwood May 27, 1884 384,739 Blakeslee June 19, 1888 1,165,864 Fottler Dec. 28, 1915 1,473,306 McGrath Nov. 6, 1923 1,536,053 Baker May 5, 1925 1,813,620 Henry July 7, 1931 2,516,746 Barlow July 25, 1950 2,636,258 Jones Apr. 28, 1953

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US146355 *Aug 16, 1873Jan 13, 1874 Improvement in can-openers
US198959 *Dec 4, 1877Jan 8, 1878 Improvement in can-openers
US299379 *May 27, 1884 Can-opener
US384739 *Nov 29, 1887Jun 19, 1888 Can-opener
US1165864 *Apr 26, 1915Dec 28, 1915Charles FottlerCan-opener.
US1473306 *Aug 6, 1921Nov 6, 1923Mcgrath John ThomasReciprocating knife can opener
US1536053 *Feb 2, 1922May 5, 1925Baker Vernon ECan opener
US1813620 *Aug 8, 1930Jul 7, 1931Henry Cashly ACan opener
US2516746 *Dec 17, 1947Jul 25, 1950Barlow Garland PFluid container opener
US2636258 *Feb 23, 1949Apr 28, 1953Allen JonesFluid can punch and opener
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2971257 *Jan 6, 1959Feb 14, 1961Everett Robert HCan piercing mechanism
US3057060 *Jan 16, 1961Oct 9, 1962Morsch Jesse JCan punch
Classifications
U.S. Classification30/447, D08/33
International ClassificationB67B7/48, B67B7/00
Cooperative ClassificationB67B7/24
European ClassificationB67B7/24