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Publication numberUS2725670 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 6, 1955
Filing dateSep 28, 1953
Priority dateSep 28, 1953
Publication numberUS 2725670 A, US 2725670A, US-A-2725670, US2725670 A, US2725670A
InventorsWilliam Hodes
Original AssigneeWilliam Hodes
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Manipulative animated toys
US 2725670 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 6, 1955 w. HODES 2,725,670

MANIPULATIVE ANIMATED TOYS Filed Sept. 28, 1953 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR. WILLIAM HoDEs Dec. 6, 1955 w. HODES 2,725,670

MANIPULATIVE ANIMATED TOYS Filed Sept. 28, 1955 v 2 SheetsSheet 2 INVENTOR. WILLIAM HODES United States Patent O MANIPULATIVE ANIMATED T0318 William Hades, Kew Gardens, N.'Y.

Application September 28, 1953, Serial No. 382,725

.3 Claims. (Cl. 4.6-11) The present invention :relates generally to toys .or amusement devices and more particularly .to :a .new and improved toy adapted for manipulation by an operator so as to simulate the-natural movements of a live animal.

The principal object of the invention .is to provide in very simple .form a replica of a living creature which conspicuously effected 'byrnanipulation of a rod extending into the body of the animal and protruding therebelow.

,A more specific object of the invention is -to provide a flexible mouse-like replica of natural appearance "fabricated of fur skin, the replica beinghollow and including a small openingin thebottomthereof, whereby the creature may be cleverly manipulated :by an index finger -in serted therein.

Yet :another object of the invention is to provide a my of the above-described type of simple and sturdy :design which may be manufactured in xpensively ,and sold at a reasonable cost.

For further comprehension of the invention, and of the objects and advantages thereof, reference will be had to the following description and accompanying drawing, and to the appended claims in which the various novel features of the invention are more particularly set forth.

In the drawing, wherein the figures constitute a material part of the disclosure:

Fig. l is a perspective view of a caged replica of a mouse in accordance with the invention;

Fig. 2 is a sectional view of said replica showing the manner by which the creature may be made to simulate movement;

Fig. 3 is a view of the bottom of the cage for the replica;

Fig. 4 is a bottom view of the replica, per sc;

Fig. 5 is a sectional view of a modified form of a mouselike replica provided with means to manipulate same;

Fig. 6 is an inverted perspective view showing the cage of the modification illustrated in Fig. 5 in a partially pulled out position from the packaging container;

Fig. 7 is a vertical longitudinal sectional view showing a modified form of the invention; and

Fig. 8 is a bottom plan view of Fig. 7, shown partially in section.

Referring now to the drawing and more particularly to Figs. 1 to 4, a preferred embodiment of a toy in ac- 2,725,570 Patented Dec. 6, 1&55

2 cordance with the invention comprises a life-like replica 1.0 of :a mouse the mouse being confined :within a cage 11.

The replica'l fl is formed of a flexible'body 12 so shaped as to provide .a realistic representation .of the mouse. Attached to the rearof body 12 is a tail-like member 32.

Although the replica can be made of various materials suitable for this purpose, preferred results are realized by the use of genuine fur skin, so processed as to afford in its final aspects all the physical characteristics of a live mouse in full scale. It is to be understood, however, that the invention is not limited to representations of a mouse, the invention being equally successful with any type of animal replica, such as a rabbit or squirrel, etc.

While the replica outwardly presents the appearance of a mouse, the inside of body 12 is completely hollow. The base 13 of the body adjacent the haunches thereof has an elongated opening 14 formed therein to admit the index finger of either hand of the operator. Surrounding opening 14 in base 13 is a peripheral flange 15 integral with the base.

Cage 11is constituted by a rectangular base board 16, a-removable-rectangularceiling board 17, and spaced vertical bars 18 connected to the base. Provided in base board 16 is an elongated opening 19 whose dimensions substantially correspond to that of the flange of the replica. The flange is received within the opening 14 and is cemented or otherwise secured to the wall of the opening, thereby attaching the replica -to the base board. As the replica is secured to the base board 16 only at the point of the opening therein, the forepart of the-body may be manipulated to emulate movement of the animal represented.

In order to operate the toy, as shown'in Fig. '2, the index finger'zil of either hand is inserted through opening 19 into the body of the replica, the finger fi ttinghsomewhat loosely within the replica. By flexing the finger or=by a-variety of other finger motions, the mouse-like replica may be caused to raise itshead, to move its body sidewise andto go through a range of movements which, as 'the operator" develops skill in manipulation, will appear strikingly life-like and realistic.

As shown in Fig. l, the cage '11 is "best held in the Palm o the "ha d. and r ppe with t thumb ains the edge of the base plate andthe index finger inserted :throughthe opening inthe base plate to manipulate the mouse. In this way, the hand of the operator appears deceptively to serve only for the purpose of supporting the cage, and an observer will usually fail to perceive that the operator is also responsible for the movement of the mouse. Thus even where the mouse is recognized as being merely a replica, its movement will provide mystification and amusement.

While I have shown the replica as imprisoned within a cage, it is to be understood that the replica may, if desired, be held directly in the hand, in which event one may dispense with the flange on the bottom wall.

in the event the toy is to be manipulated by one lacking digital dexterity or by a child whose finger length is inadequate for this purpose, in accordance with another feature of the invention as shown in Figs. 5 and 6 wherein parts corresponding to Figs. 1 to 4 are given like numerals with a prime added, in lieu of the index finger there is provided a rod 21, preferably circular, which is inserted diagonally through the opening, the inner end of the rod coming in contact with the head of the mouse, approximately below the ears thereon. The rod is of such length as to project below the bottom opening at the base of the cage, the portion thereof within the replica body serving as a sort of spinal column, the exterior portion acting as a lever operating against the fulcrum provided by the wall of the opening. To facilitate manipulation of the rod by the tip of 3 the finger, the full end thereof is provided with a cup-like flange 22.

For the purpose of filling out the haunches of the animal and thereby imparting the desired form thereto, the hind portion of the body is filled with resilient material 23 such as foam rubber or a material having similar resilient properties. Thus when the replica is prodded by the rod to assume a new position, the resilient material then tends to restore the body to its initial rest position. It will be appreciated, therefore, that by this expedient the slightest pressure of a finger on the projecting end of the rod will be transmitted to the replica imprisoned within the cage. By rotating and shifting the angular position of the rod, a great variety of movements can be transmitted to the replica, and as this skill is developed by the operator with increasing experience, the illusion of natural and excited movement of the mouse may be very effectively produced. In this instance, the cage may be held in the palm of the hand and gripped between the thumb and the finger remote therefrom, while the tip of the index finger is applied to the end of the rodto manipulate the mouse.

In Fig. 6 the cage 11 is shown partly projected from a packaging container or wrapper 26. This container is open at one end 27 and is formed with an inwardly extending centrally located slot 28 which will permit the operating rod 21 to pass through the slot and to permit the cage 11' to be slid into the package container 26.

In Figs. 7 and 8 the rod 21 is shown to be anchored in position by a suitable rubber band or the like 29 which is wound around the rod 21* at 30 and is secured to the walls of the cage 11 at 31.

In other respects this form of the invention is similar to the previous forms and the similar parts may be recognized with corresponding numerals and with a prime added.

While I have illustrated and described the preferred embodiment of my invention, it is to be understood that I do not limit myself to the precise construction herein disclosed and the right is reserved to all changes and modifications coming within the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new, and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent 1. An amusement device comprising a replica having a shape and an outer surface simulating the natural appearance ofa mouse, said replica having a hollow body of fur skin and being provided with an elongated bottom opening communicating therein, a cage imprisoning said replica and having a base plate provided with an opening, a means attaching said replica to said base plate with the openings therein in registration, a rod extending through said openings into said body for manipulation thereof, and foam rubber filling said replica, the free end of said rod having a cup shaped flange thereon, said rod being held in operative position by a rubber band, said rubber band being secured to the said cage and wound around the said rod for resiliently manipulating the latter.

2. An amusement device comprising a replica having a shape and an outer surface simulating the natural appearance of a mouse, said replica having a hollow body of fur skin and being provided with an elongated bottom opening communicating therein, a cage imprisoning said replica and having a base plate provided with an opening, a means attaching said replica to said base plate with the openings therein in registration, a rod extending through said openings into said body for manipulation thereof, and foam rubber filling said replica, the free end of said rod having a cup shaped flange thereon, said rod being held in operative position by a rubber band, said rubber band being secured to the said cage and wound around the said rod for resiliently manipulating the latter, the cage including the simulated mouse is adapted to be slid into a package container, a slot in said package container is adapted to accommodate the said extension rod used for manipulating the said mouse replica.

3. An amusement device comprising a replica having a shape and an outer surface simulating an animal, said replica having a hollow body, a cage imprisoning said replica and having an opening, a rod extending through said opening and into said hollow body, said rod having a cup shaped flange thereon, resilient means secured to said cageand to said rod for resilient manipulation, means securing said animal in said cage, and a packaging container slidably held on said cage, said container having a centrally located slot to receive said rod.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,417,860 Reich May 30, 1922 1,501,912 Meehan July 22, 1924 1,782,843 Derus Nov. 25, 1930 2,655,762 Burke Oct. 20, 1953 2,667,718 Wilhelm Feb. 2, 1954

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1417860 *Dec 11, 1919May 30, 1922Hannah ReichToy
US1501912 *Jun 21, 1920Jul 22, 1924Meehan Florence BDancing doll
US1782843 *May 12, 1926Nov 25, 1930Derus Albert EMechanically-operated figure toy
US2655762 *Nov 26, 1951Oct 20, 1953Dolores BurkePuppet doll
US2667718 *Oct 22, 1948Feb 2, 1954Voices IncCompressible sound producing toy and voice therefor
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2840950 *Mar 15, 1957Jul 1, 1958Julcs CotlerHand puppets
US2908499 *Dec 26, 1957Oct 13, 1959Fishlove & CoAmusement novelty
US3471966 *Jul 27, 1966Oct 14, 1969Kratzer KarlManipulatory puppet
US3526990 *Jul 27, 1967Sep 8, 1970Edmonds William BPlatform with hand-and-arm simulation for use with hand-operated puppets,dolls and ventriloquial figures
US3918180 *Oct 11, 1973Nov 11, 1975Chamberlin Robert WPuppet book structure
US3990176 *Sep 6, 1973Nov 9, 1976Felix PuschkarskiLife-like toy animal
US4081925 *Aug 30, 1976Apr 4, 1978Apple Merrill KFinger puppets
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US4280292 *Aug 14, 1980Jul 28, 1981Animal Toys Plus, Inc.Torso-and display-supportable puppet
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US4327668 *Jan 15, 1981May 4, 1982Phillips Robert GRecreational device
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US4561854 *Feb 20, 1985Dec 31, 1985Coleco Industries, Inc.Creature with snap action jaw
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US6340507Dec 22, 1998Jan 22, 2002Sylvia Gomez HolguinSelf-securing pompon
US6663456 *Feb 12, 2002Dec 16, 2003Innovative Usa, Inc.Combined story media and puppet toy
US6672929May 1, 2002Jan 6, 2004Lisa LeleuPuppet system
US20130036651 *Aug 11, 2011Feb 14, 2013William JohnsHunting decoy
WO1987006150A1 *Apr 7, 1987Oct 22, 1987Maynard H ClarkPuppet apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/327, 472/51, 446/366, 472/70
International ClassificationA63H3/14, A63H3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63H3/14
European ClassificationA63H3/14