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Publication numberUS2727746 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 20, 1955
Filing dateFeb 16, 1953
Priority dateFeb 16, 1953
Publication numberUS 2727746 A, US 2727746A, US-A-2727746, US2727746 A, US2727746A
InventorsDouglas T Hawkes
Original AssigneeDouglas T Hawkes
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game apparatus
US 2727746 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 20, 1955 D, T HAWKES 2,727,746

GAME: APPARATUS Filed Feb. 16, 1953 2 Sheets-Sheet l slsll mez-Two one rwo l WIN WIN WIN W\N W\N \N\N WIN 4 6 START La L20 s OMI-TWO UNE TWO om -Two ONE -TWO F@ 2 3 f 6,1 #ff 1 fr snow snow snow snow snow sHow eHow "g'` mvsuron DOUGLAS 72 HAWKES ATTORNEYS Dec. 20, 1955 D. T. HAwKEs 2,727,746

GAME APPARATUS Filed Feb.Y 16, 1953 2 sheets-snee1 2 INVENTOR oor/GLAS T. Haw/ass AWA@ United States Patent O 2,727,746 GAME APPARATUS Douglas T. Hawkes, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada Application February 16, 1953, Serial No. 337,165

4 Claims. (Cl. 273-134) This invention relates to game apparatus for amusement purposes.

This game is intended to simulate racing, and it may represent races between horses, cars, or any other racing animal or vehicle.

The game apparatus comprises, in combination, indiciadetermining means, a plurality of markers, anda game board having a plurality of courses indicated thereon bearing indicia corresponding to those on the indiciadetermining means, and an elongated pointsor oddsindicating strip positioned at right angles to the courses. One or more playing areas may be associated with the board and, if desired, they may form part of the board.

For the sake of convenience, the game apparatus will be described in connection with horse racing. Each marker represents a horse, and there is a horse for each course on the board. The indicia-determining means are used to determine the progress of each marker along its course, while each player indicates in the playing area the marker or horse he thinks will come in first, second or third in the race. Some means may be provided for indicating the progress or lack of progress'of each player in the game. For example, tokens, such as stage money, beans, matches, or the like, may be used by the players for the purpose of placing wagers on the horses. The odds-indicating strip is used to determine the odds on the various horses in a manner lhereinafter described. The arrangement of the above elements and the particular manner of using the game apparatus will be understood bythe following detailed disclosure of the preferred embodiment illustrated in `the accompanying drawings, in which,

Figure l isa plan view of a preferred arrangement of game board with one end broken off,

Figure 2 is an enlarged sectional view taken along the line 22 showing one manner of holding the elongated odds-indicating strip to the game board,I v

Figure 3 is an example of a type of marker representing a racing animal or vehicle that may-be used on one of the courses as the game is played, and

Figure 4 shows examples of'playing cards that might be used with the apparatus as indicia-determining means.

Referring to Figure 1 of the drawings, 10 is a game board formed of any suitable material, such as paper, cloth, cardboard, wood, or the like..This board is divided into a playing surface 11 and one or more playing areas 12, there being two of these areas illustrated in the drawing. The playing surface 11 includes a plurality of parallel courses 13, each of which is divided into an equal number of spaces 14. Each course is identified by a suitable form of indicia which, in the illustrated example, is a numeral designated by the reference character 15. The courses 13 represent the paths followed by horses in a race. y

A plurality of markers 18 are provided, see Figure 3, one for each course 13. These markers bear symbols or indicia corresponding ,to kthose of the courses so that ice if the courses are indicated by the numbers one to seven, the markers would also bear the numbers one to seven.

Each playing area 12 is divided into a plurality of sections, there being one or more of these sections for each course 13, and the section or sections for each course bear the identifying indicia of its course. For example, each of the playing areas may be divided into a plurality of sections 20, one for each course, representing first or win, a plurality of corresponding sections 21 representing at least second or place, and a plurality of sections 22 representing at least third or show. Sections 20, 21 and 22 for course 1 and, consequently, horse or marker 1, each bear the numeral l; sections 20, 21 and 22 for course 2 and marker or horse 2, bear the numeral 2; and so on.

The pointsor odds-indicating strip Z5 extends across the playing surface 11 of the game board at either end of the courses 13. This strip may be just laid across the board, but it is preferably slidably held in position thereon. For this purpose, one or more loops 26 may be positioned on the surface of the board, in which case the strip slidably extends under these loops. The strip is divided into a plurality of sections 28 throughout its length, the width of each section being substantially equal to the width of a course 13. Each section 28 has a number 29 therein representing odds, as will hereinafter be more fully described. One of the sections near the centre of the strip, for example, section 30, bears one or two numbers which are higher than those of the other sections. In this example, section 30 includes the numerals l0 and 15.

If desired, a plurality of additional sections 34 representing one-two sections may be placed on the board. In this example, the sections 34 are located in the playing area l2 around the group formed by the other sections thereof. Each section 34 bears two numbers 35, such as l-Z, l-3, and the like.

As previously stated, indicia-determining means are provided for regulating the progress of the markers 18 along the courses 13. This may be a spinning wheel, specially printed cards, or dice, or the like, each bearing indicia corresponding to the indicia of the courses and markers or horses. As playing cards are readily available, it is preferable to use such cards as the indiciadetermining means. Figure 4 shows a plurality of cards 38 which may be used for this purpose. If the courses 13 are designated by the numbers 1-7, allthe cards bearing the numbers l (ace) to 7 of at least two decks of cards are used. If cards from two decks are used, there will be eight cards of each number, that is, eight twos, eight threes, etc. As there are ten spaces 14 in each course 13 of the illustrated example, some way must be worked out to enable each marker 18 to move the full length of its course with the limited cards available. For example, each heart or diamond card may call for a move of one space for a marker, each club card a move of two spaces, and each spade card a move of three spaces.

When a game is about to be started, the markers 1S with the numerals 1 7 thereon are placed on the spaces at the beginning of the courses bearing the corresponding numbers. The horses are now ready for the race.' The deck of cards 3S may be cut to indicate the position of the odds strip 25. If a card bearing the number 5 is turned up, the section 30 of the strip is placed opposite course number 5, as shown in the drawing. The rules of the game may be such that if the card cut is black, the odds to win would be fifteen to one, whereas if the card is red, the odds would be ten to one. This means that if the horses indicated by marker 5 were to win, these odds would be paid. This horse would be considered a long shot. Suitableprovision may be made in the rules for the odds if this horse comes in second or third (place or Show), and these may be three to one and two to one respectively. The indication of the long shot by the odds-indicating strip as described above sets the sections 28 opposite the other courses, thereby automatically setting the odds for the horses of their respective courses should they win. With the strip 25 in the position shown in Figure 1, if horse number 6 Were to win, the odds would be four to one, while they would be tive to one if horse number 2 came in rst. The place and show odds for the horses other than the long shot would also be set by the rules and may be two to one and one to one, respectively.

Before the odds are set by the strip 25, the players place their wagers in the desired sections 2t?, 21 and 22. For example, if a player bets that number 3 horse will win, he would place his wager in the section 20 bearing the numeral 3. On the other hand, if he thinks number 3 horse will place or show, he will place his wager in the appropriate section 21 or 22 bearing the numeral 3. A place wager wins if the horse comes in rst or second, and a show bet if the horse comes in rst, second or third. If the player wishes to bet the one-two, he will place his wager in a selected section. By this, he is designating the number-combination of the two horses that will first cross the finishing line. For example, if he selects the section with 3-7 in it, this means he hopes that horses 3 and 7 will finish first and second, but it does not matter which of these two horses comes in first and which comes second. The odds for a Winning combination such as this will be set by the rules, and may be, say, sixteen to one.

The game may be played in various ways. One player may act as banker and dealer. Once all the wagers have been made and the odds determined by the positioning of the odds tape, the dealer, after shuling the cards turns them up one at a time. If a two of diamonds is turned up, marker number 2 is moved forward one space along its course 13, if a ve of spades is turned up, marker number is moved along three spaces in its course. This is continued until the first, second and third horses arrive at the opposite end of their respective courses. The banker then collects all losing wagers and pays off the winners in accordance with their selections and the odds of the race.

The banker may act on his own behalf or on behalf of all players. In the latter case, the fund of the bank is made up by a contribution from each player. The banker also places his own wagers, and if the bank accumulates an excess of tokens, some of these may periodically be divided amongst the players as dividends. Should the bank fund become depleted, the players would be assessed an agreed number of tokens to restore it. At the end of the game, the bank fund would be divided between the players.

The winner of the game may be the player who has the most tokens at the time another player has lost all of his, or at a predetermined time limit, or at the end of the evening.

What I claim as my invention is:

1. A game apparatus comprising, in combination, a game board having a playing surface with a plurality of parallel courses bearing indicia thereon, each of said courses being composed of a number of marked spaces, indicia-determining means, the indicia on said indiciadetermining means being the same as the course indicia,

markers for the courses bearing the indicia of the latter, and an elongated strip extending across said game board and transversely of the courses near the end thereof, said strip being movable relative to the game board and having numbers side by side thereon to indicate the points attributed to each course at a selected position of said strip in relation to the courses, and the numbers of said strip being so arranged that when one is in line with a course, the others are aligned with other courses.

2. A game apparatus comprising in combination, a game board having a playing surface with a plurality of parallel courses bearing indicia thereon, each of said courses being composed of a number of marked spaces, indicia-determining means, the indicia on said indiciadetermining means being the same as the course indicia, a marker to be moved along each course, a plurality ot loops parallel to one another and connected to said game board, and an elongated strip extending across said game board and transversely of the courses near the end thereof, and held thereon by said loops, said strip being slidable in said loops and having spaced numbers thereon arranged longitudinally of its length to indicate the points attributed to each course at a selected position of said strip in relation to the courses, and the numbers of said strip being so arranged that when one is in line with a course, the others are aligned with other courses.

3. A game apparatus comprising, in combination, a game board having a playing surface with a plurality of numbered parallel courses thereon, each of said courses being composed of a number of marked spaces, a pack of numbered playing cards, the numbers on said playing cards being the same as the numbers on said courses, a marker to be moved along each course, said markers bearing the numbers of the courses, and an elongated strip extending across said game board, said strip being movable relative to the game board and having spaced numbers thereon arranged longitudinally of its length to indicate the points attributed to each course at a selected position of said strip in relation to the courses, and the numbers of said strip being so arranged that when one is in line with a course, the others are aligned with other courses.

4. A game apparatus comprising, in combination, a game board having a playing surface with a plurality of parallel courses bearing indicia thereon, each of said courses being composed of a number of marked spaces, indicia-determining means, the indicia on said indiciadetermining means being the same as the course indicia, markers for the courses bearing the indicia of the latter, and an elongated strip extending across the game board adjacent an end of the courses and being movable relative thereto, said stripV being divided into a plurality of sections bearing points-indicating numbers, and said strip being movable into different positions to place one of its sections at the end of each course.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
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US1170298 *Apr 3, 1915Feb 1, 1916Joseph Gillis LundyLaundry-registering device.
US1519422 *Jan 16, 1922Dec 16, 1924Nelson M WayGame
US2543609 *Oct 26, 1948Feb 27, 1951 Merchandise order indicator
GB601939A * Title not available
GB190920635A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3117790 *Feb 1, 1962Jan 14, 1964Joseph B WhiteRacing game with spinner and dial for indicating the direction of movement of each playing piece
US4421316 *Mar 23, 1981Dec 20, 1983Brown William FThree-fingered spinner game of chance
US4729568 *Sep 9, 1985Mar 8, 1988Stephen D. BaileyHorse race board game
US4779873 *Oct 31, 1986Oct 25, 1988Joergensen Kolbein OElectrical game apparatus
US4917386 *Jun 22, 1989Apr 17, 1990Tozer W JamesApparatus and method of playing a board game simulating a race
US5251570 *Jan 24, 1992Oct 12, 1993Eagle Scoring SystemsMultipurpose scoreboard system
US7883091 *Oct 2, 2008Feb 8, 2011Wilds John CHorse racing board game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/246, 116/225
International ClassificationA63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00006, A63F3/00082
European ClassificationA63F3/00A10