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Publication numberUS2727860 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 20, 1955
Filing dateMar 7, 1952
Priority dateMar 7, 1952
Publication numberUS 2727860 A, US 2727860A, US-A-2727860, US2727860 A, US2727860A
InventorsDuke Marshall, Fortess Fred, Jr Conrad Hohing
Original AssigneeCelanese Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Textile lubricants
US 2727860 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

TEXTILE LUBRICANTS Marshall Duke, Morristown, Fred Fortess, Summit, and Conrad Hohing, Jr., Morn'stown, N. 3., assignors to Celanese Corporation of America, New York, N. Y., a corporation of Delaware No Drawing. Application March 7, 1952, Serial No. 275,464

Claims. (Cl. 252-83) This invention relates to textile lubricants and relates more particularly to textile lubricants for the treatment of organic derivative of cellulose textile materials.

An important object of the invention is to provide an improved lubricant composition for application to yarns or other textile materials having a basis of an organic derivative of cellulose for the purpose of lubricating and conditioning said textile materials.

A further object of this invention is to provide a textile lubricant of improved anti-static properties for the treatment of continuous filament yarns having a basis of an organic derivative of cellulose.

Other objects of this invention will be apparent from the following detailed description and claims.

It is customary to apply a lubricant composition to yarns and other textile materials having a basis of an organic derivative of cellulose to lubricate and condition the yarns and render the said yarns more amenable to winding, twisting, weaving, knitting and the like operations to which they are normally subjected during their production and use. To be satisfactory, the lubricant composition should, among other things, not only impart to the yarn the degree of lubrication necessary to permitf the ready handling of the yarn, but should be stable so as to retain its properties substantially unchanged OVi extended periods of time. In addition, the lubrica composition should have anti-static properties, i. c. ,it should prevent the development of static charges on the yarns during the handling of the same, since such static charges may build up to a magnitude sufliciently great to cause considerable difiiculties during the various handling operations.

According to the present invention, a lubricant composition capable of meeting all of the foregoing requirements is prepared by blending together a mineral oil, an alkyl phenol, a lower aliphatic acid ester of a vegetable oil, a modified vegetable oil, a higher fatty acid, an amine and an alkyl phosphate.

The mineral oil, which may be present in the lubricant composition in amounts of from about 30 to 65% by weight, is advantageously a highly refined white mineral oil having good stability. The mineral oil may have a viscosity of between about 50 and 85 S. U. V. to produce a lubricant composition having a viscosity of between about 109 and 250 S. U. V. All the viscosities are measured at 100 F.

The alkylated phenol, which may be present in the lubricant composition in amounts of from about 2 to 5% by weight, increases the solubility of the various constituents of the composition, lowers the viscosity of the composition as a whole and improves the wetting power of the same. While it is preferred to employ diamyl phenol in the lubricant composition, other alkylated phenols such as diamyl and dibutyl derivatives of phenols,

cresols and xylenols are also useful. These alkylated P phenols may be prepared from any of the individual pure phenols, cresols and xylenols, for example, or they may 2,727,860 Patented Dec. 20, 1955 be prepared from the technical mixed grades of these substances.

The lubricant composition also contains from about 2 to 6% by weight of a lower aliphatic acid ester of a vegetable oil. Examples of such vegetable oil organic esters are the formyl, acetyl, propionyl and butyryl esters of castor oil and castor oil derivatives, specific examples being acetylated castor oil and butyl acetyl ricinoleate.

The modified vegetable oil, which may be present in the lubricant composition in amounts of from about 5 to 25% by weight, is advantageously an oxidized peanut oil. This oil may, however, be replaced in whole or in part by sulphonated olive oil or sulfated higher fatty alcohols or by oxidized olive oil or teaseed oils, all of which serve to soften the yarn. The term modified vegetable oil is employed herein to designate oils of this type.

The higher fatty acid present in the lubricant composition may be either of the saturated or unsaturated type and may contain between 8 and 18 C atoms. Suitable higher fatty acids are, for example, oleic acid, caprylic, capric and lauric. The higher fatty acid may be present in the lubricant composition in amounts of between about 2 and 10% by weight.

The lubricant composition also contains from about 3 to 20% by weight of an amine, which is preferably an alkanolamine. The amine reacts with the higher fatty acid in the lubricant composition to form a soap in situ. Advantageously, the amine and the higher fatty acid are present in. the lubricant composition in substantially stoichiometric proportions. However, the presence of a small excess of either one or the other of these substances is not objectionable. Examples of suitable amines are triethanolamine, diethanolamine, dibutylethanolamine, diethylethanolamine and diethylcyclohexylamine.

The alkyl phosphate which forms the last ingredient of the lubricant composition and which imparts significantly improved anti-static characteristics thereto may be present in the said lubricant composition in amounts of from about 4 to 20% by weight. The alkyl phosphate may be fully esterified, but is advantageously only partially esterified, containing between about 1 and 2 alkyl groups per molecule. The alkyl groups in the alkyl phosphate may be straight or branched, and may be saturated or unsaturated, and advantageously contain from 8 to 18 C atoms. "H'preparing-the alkylphosphates,

there is preferably employed the process disclosed in Fortess et al., application Serial No. 182,614, filed August 31, 1950, now U. S. Patent No. 2,676,975. According to this process a solid, ester-forming phosphorus acid derivative such as, for example, phosphorus pentoxide, phosphorus tetroxide and phosphorus pentachloride is dispersed in an inert diluent which may advantageously be all or a portion of the mineral oil that is to be employed in the lubricant. The dispersion is then mixed with an alcohol having an alkyl chain of the desired type in an amount suflicient to produce the degree of esterification desired in the alkyl phosphate.

To form the lubricant composition, the several ingredients may be blended together in any desired manner. Best results are obtained, however, if the amine is added to the mixture of all the other ingredients so that it will react with the acid to form a soap in the presence of said other ingredients.

The lubricant composition of this invention is eminently suited for the lubrication of cellulose acetate yarns, particularly continuous filament yarns, and will be described specifically in connection therewith since cellulose acetate yarns are commercially the most important organic derivative of cellulose yarns at the present time. However, it may also be employed for the lubrication of other organic derivative of cellulose yarns such as, for example, yarns of cellulose propionate, cellulose butyrate, cellulose acetate propionate and cellulose acetate butyrate.

The following examples are given to illustrate this invention further.

' Example I There are blended together 55.0 parts by weight of a highly refined white mineral oil having a S. U. V. of 50, 4.5 parts by weight of diamyl phenol, 5.0 parts by weight of butyl acetyl ricinoleate, 16.0 parts by Weight of oxidized peanut oil, 5.0 parts by weight of oleic acid and 10.0 parts by weight of a mixture containing 50% by weight of the phosphate esters of mixed decanols containing, on the average, 1 /2 alkyl groups per molecule. To the mixture so formed, there is added 4.5 parts by weight of tn'ethanolamine.

The resultant lubricant composition is stable even when maintained at elevated temperatures for extended periods of time, showing no appreciable change in pH, viscosity or the like. It shows little tendency to absorb moisture from the atmosphere and is stable when mixed with small amounts of acetone as is likely to occur when applied to freshly spun cellulose acetate yarn. The

lubricant composition shows little or no tendency to corrode black iron and may, therefore, be safely handled in black iron equipment.

Cellulose acetate yarns treated with this lubricant composition show no tendency to develop static when subjected to the normal textile treatments and are otherwise readily handled during the said textile treatments.

Example 11 w There are blended together 55.5 parts by weight of a highly refined white mineral oil having a S. U. V. of 50,

" parable to those of the lubricant composition of Example I, but has an improved lubricity. v It is to be understood that the foregoing detailed description is given merely by way of illustration and that many variations may be made ut departing from thespirit6f6ur invention.

Having described our invention, what we desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A textile lubricant comprising from about 30 to 4 by weight of a mineral oil, from about 2 to 5% of an alkyl phenol, from about 2 to 6% by weight of a substance selected from the group consisting of the formyl, acetyl, propionyl and butyryl esters of castor oil, and butyl acetyl ricinoleate, of from about 5 to 25% by weight of a substance selected from the group consisting of oxidized peanut oil, sulfonated olive oil, sulfated higher fatty alcohols, oxidized olive oil and oxidized teaseed oil, from about 2 to 10% by Weight of a higher fatty acid, from about 3 to 20% by weight of an amine, and from about 4 to 20% by weight of an alkyl phosphate.

2. A textile lubricant comprising from about 30 to 65 by weight of a mineral oil, from about 2 to 5% by weight of an alkyl phenol, from about 2 to 6% by weight of a substance selected from the group consisting of the formyl, acetyl, propionyl and butyryl esters of castor oil, and butyl acetyl ricinoleate, from about 5 to 25% by weight of oxidized peanut oil, from about 2 to 10% by weight of a higher fatty acid, from about 3 to 20% by weight of an alkanolamine, and from about 4 to 20% by weight of an alkyl phosphate.-

3. A textile lubricant comprising 59.5 parts by weight of a mineral oil, 4.5 parts by weight of diamyl phenol, 4.0 parts by weight of butyl acetyl ricinoleate, 20.0 parts by weight of oxidized peanut oil, 4.0 parts by weight of oleic acid, 4.0 parts by weight of triethanolamine, and 4.0 parts by weight of the phosphate ester of mixed decanols.

4. Cellulose acetate continuous filament yarns lubricated with from about 30 to 65% by weight of a mineral oil, from about 2 to 5% by weight of an alkyl phenol, from about 2 to 6% by weight of a substance selected from the group consisting of the formyl, acetyl, propionyl and butyryl esters of castor oil, and butyl acetyl ricinoleate, from about 5 to 25% by weight of oxidized peanut oil, from about 2 to 10% by weight of a higher fatty acid, from about 3 to 20% by weight of an alkanolamine, and from about 4 to 20% by weight of an alkyl phosphate. 1 5. Cellulose acetate continuous filament yarns lubrig-ated with 59.5 parts by weight of a mineral oil, 4.5

parts by weight of diamyl phenol, 4.0 parts by weight butyl acetyl ricinoleate, 20.0 parts by weight of oxijZed peanut oil, 4.0 parts by weight of oleic acid, 4.0 parts by weight of triethanolamine, and 4.0 parts by weight of the phosphate ester of mixed decanols.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Seymour et al Nov. 20, 1951

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2182323 *Mar 4, 1939Dec 5, 1939Celanese CorpTreatment of textile materials
US2385423 *Oct 3, 1942Sep 25, 1945Celanese CorpTreatment of textile materials
US2575382 *Dec 21, 1949Nov 20, 1951Celanese CorpFiber lubricant composition
US2575399 *Oct 7, 1948Nov 20, 1951Celanese CorpTextile lubricant
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2976186 *Nov 27, 1957Mar 21, 1961Eastman Kodak CoTreated textile fiber
US3223545 *Oct 8, 1962Dec 14, 1965Phillips Petroleum CoDialkanol amide antistatic composition for polyolefins
US3505097 *Apr 20, 1967Apr 7, 1970Hercules IncLustrous pile fabric based on polypropylene
US4014800 *May 22, 1974Mar 29, 1977Hoechst AktiengesellschaftAmine oxide, paraffin oil, silicone oil