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Publication numberUS2728859 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 27, 1955
Filing dateJan 31, 1952
Priority dateSep 30, 1947
Publication numberUS 2728859 A, US 2728859A, US-A-2728859, US2728859 A, US2728859A
InventorsGochenour Alice M, Gochenour Raymond B
Original AssigneeAllied Lab Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for irradiation of liquids
US 2728859 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 27, 1955 R. B. GOCHENOUR ET AL 2,728,859

APPARATUS FOR IRRADIATION OF LIQUIDS Original Filed Sept. 30, 1947 PP Ida 00 w s 93% Wu a V0 m m 1m 5 5 M a m 3 United States Patent APPARATUS FOR IRRADIATION OF LIQUHDS Raymond B. Gochenour and Alice M. Gochenour, Zionsville, Ind, assignors to Allied Laboratories, Inc., Kansas City, Mo a corporation of Delaware Uriginai application September 30, 1 947, Serial No. 776,946. Divided and this application January 31, 1952, Serial No. 269,312

6 Claims. Cl. 250-49 This invention relates to apparatus for treating liquids with radiant energy, more particularly to apparatus for producing a thin continuously flowing film of a liquid and subjecting said film of liquid to the action of radiant energy. This application is a division of a prior application, Serial No. 776,946 filed September 30, 1947, now U. S. Patent No. 2,588,716, entitled Process and Apparatus for the Irradiation of Liquids.

The methods and apparatus disclosed and broadly claimed in the said prior application involve the use of a rapidly rotating cylinder positioned with respect to the vertical to provide for gravity induced liquid flow down- Wardly from the upper internal surface, whereby the combined effects of gravity and centrifugal force produce a continuously flowing thin film of liquid over a large area which is subjected to ultraviolet radiation. The present invention is directed to the liquid feeding and collecting means disclosed but not specifically claimed in said prior application.

It is an object of the present invention to provide means for flowing the liquid to be irradiated onto the upper internal surface of the aforesaid rotating cylinder at a controlled rate without splashing, and means for accomplishing sterile collection of the irradiated liquid at the lower end of the cylinder.

It is another object of the invention to provide a simple and adjustable means for flowing a liquid onto a rotating cylindrical internal surface.

A still further object of the invention is to provide means for collecting the irradiated liquid after it has passed through the irradiating device and maintaining the liquid in sterile condition.

Still another object is the provision of devices which are easily dismantled for cleaning and are easily reassembled.

For a more complete understanding of the invention, reference should now be had to the drawing in which:

Fig. 1 is the central vertical sectional view of an apparatus embodying the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a horizontal sectional view taken along the line 22 of Fig. l; and

Fig. 3 is a similar view taken along the line 3-3, the ultraviolet lamp being omitted in both Figs. 2 and 3.

Referring now to the drawing, the invention is shown as embodied in a liquid irradiating apparatus comprising a cylinder 1 whichis preferably a stainless steel open ended tube about 30 inches long and about 2 inches in diameter, which cylinder is suspended by ball bearings 2 mounted on a supporting frame 3. As shown, the cylinder 1 has mounted thereon a grooved pulley 4 for cooperation with a V-belt whereby the cylinder can be driven by a constant speed motor (not shown) or other suitable driving means. Positioned within the cylinder 1 and extending substantially axially thereof, is a 30 W. germicidal ultraviolet (commercially available) lamp 5, the spacing of the lamp relative to the cylinder 1 being such that the ultraviolet radiations from thelamp are effectively transmitted to the inside cylinder wall. In order to support the lamp 5 in the axial position shown, a lamp socket 7 is provided which is mounted in the support 6 and into which one end of the lamp 5 may be plugged. An upper lamp socket 9 is supported above the open upper end of the cylinder 1 by a suitable supporting member 8, with the socket 9 being directly above the socket 7 on the vertical axis of the cylinder 1. The support member 8 is removably attached to the frame support 3 in order that the lamp 5 may be readily inserted in the lower socket 7, and the members and the socket 9 may then be secured in the operative position shown. The sockets 7 and 9 are connected to a suitable constant voltage source of electric power (not shown).

In accordance with the present invention, sterile liquid collecting means are provided at the lower end of the cylinder 1 comprising a cup-like liquid receiver 10 having upstanding inner and outer walls 10a and 10b, respectively, which are spaced to define the central opening 10:: surrounded by an annular liquid receiving chamber 10d. As shown, the lamp 5 passes through the central opening and the inner wall extends some distance up and around a ray emitting portion of the lamp. The outer wall 101) of the receiving cup it} surrounds the lower end of the cylinder 1 and extends upwardly in spaced relation to the outer wall of the cylinder. With the cup positioned, as shown in Fig. l of the drawings, it will be seen that the lower end of the cylinder 1 extends into the annular liquid receiving chamber 10d so that liquid discharged from the lower end of the cylinder 1 will be collected in the chamber 10d from which it is discharged through a suitable spout 102 which may be connected by a suitable sterile conduit to a sterile storage vessel. The cup or receiver 10 is supported in the position shown in Fig. 1 of the drawing by suitable thumb screws 11, and it will be observed that merely by loosening one or more of the thumb screws, the cup 10 may be readily removed for cleaning and may be readily replaced in the desired position. In order further to render the cup 10 sterile and prevent contamination of the irradiated liquid by dust or the like, a shield 12 is provided which is in the form of a cylindrical member attached to the lower side of the pulley 4 and which extends over and around the outer wall 10b of the cup 10. It will be remembered that the inner wall 10a of the cup 10 is spaced from the lamp 5 and it will be observed that any air passing into the cylinder through this space will be subjected to the sterilizing rays emitted by the lamp 5 before the air enters the cylinder 1.

In order to introduce the liquid to be sterilized into the cylinder 1 adjacent the upper end of the cylinder at a controlled constant rate and without splashing of theliquid, suitable feed means are provided including means for supplying the liquid under a controlled constant pres sure. As shown, a liquid container 13 having an air pressure inlet 14 is provided with a liquid outlet tube 15 which is connected to one end of a hollow tubular feedon member 16. This feed-on member 16 which is preferably shaped as shown in Fig. 3, has its outlet and terminal end 16:: positioned near the internal wall of the cylinder 1, adjacent the upper end of the cylinder, and this outlet end of the feed-on member 16 faces in the direction of rotation of the cylinder ll so as to flow the liquid onto the cylinder wall without splashing. Hypodermic needles have been found satisfactory for use as feed-on members since the rate of liquid flow can be altered, assuming a constant pressure on the container 13, merely by using needles of different gauge. The feed-on member 16 is supported, as shown, in a suitable support member 17 which is arranged to permit adjustment of the element 16 relative to the internal wall of the cylinder 1.

In employing the apparatus disclosed in the drawing for carrying out improved methods disclosed and claimed in the above referred to prior application, the liquid to be irradiated is placed in the container 13, the air inlet tube 14 is attached to a constant air pressure source, and the liquid is thus forced at a constant rate through the feed-on member 16 and is caused to flow onto the internal upper wall of the cylinder 1 without splashing. The cylinder 1 is rotated at a speed which must be sufliciently high to centrifugally produce a thin film of liquid on the inner wall of the cylinder which flows downwardly along the cylinder wall and is subjected to the radiations of the lamp during its passage through the cylinder. It will be understood that the ultraviolet lamp having been previously positioned, as shown in the drawing, and having been connected with a suitable constant voltage source of electric power, the inner wall of the cylinder will have been sterilized by the radiations from the lamp prior to the introduction of the liquid.

The previously sterilized liquid receiver it is positioned, as illustrated in the drawing, and the irradiated liquid is collected in the cup as it flows from the lower end of the rotating cylinder 1, and the irradiated liquid is maintained in sterile condition in the cup 19 from which it flows through the spout 10c into a suitable receptacle. The upper open end of the cylinder 1 may, if desired, be protected from the atmosphere by a Formalin soaped piece of gauze or other suitable means.

As will be apparent from the foregoing description, both the sterile collecting means and the feed means employed in conjunction with the rotating cylinder 1, are of simple construction and may be readily adjusted and removed for cleaning and replacement. Moreover, the feed means provides a constant fiow of liquid onto the inner internal surface of the cylinder without splashing while permitting ready adjustment of the position of the feed-on member and ready adjustment of the rate of flow. Likewise, the collecting means functions to maintain the irradiated liquid in a sterile condition until it is discharged into a suitable sterile receptacle.

While a particular embodiment of the invention has been shown, it will be understood, of course, that the invention is not limited thereto since many modifications may be made and it is therefore contemplated by the appended claims to cover any such modifications as fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

1. In an apparatus for irradiating liquids with active rays including a rotatable hollow cylinder disposed with respect to the vertical to provide for gravity induced liquid flow from the upper internal surface thereof to the lower internal surface thereof, the combination of a cup-like receiver having inner and outer walls defining a central opening surrounded by an annular liquid receiving chamber, means for supporting said receiver with said outer wall surrounding the lower end of said cylinder in spaced relation thereto, an active ray emitting tube within said cylinder having the lower end thereof extending through said central opening, and means for introducing a liquid to be irradiated onto the inner surface of said cylinder adjacent the upper end thereof.

2. In an apparatus for irradiating liquids with active rays including a rotatable hollow cylinder disposed with respect to the vertical to provide for gravity induced liquid flow from the upper internal surface thereof to the lower internal surface thereof, the combination of a cup-like receiver having inner and outer walls of substan tial height defining a central opening surrounded by an annular liquid receiving chamber, means for removably supporting said receiver with said outer wall surrounding the lower end of said cylinder in spaced relation thereto and with said inner wall extending into said cylinder, an active ray emitting tube within said cylinder having a ray emitting portion thereof extending through said central opening, whereby irradiated liquid may be col lected in said liquid receiving chamber without exposure to contaminated air, and means for introducing a liquid to be irradiated onto the inner surface of said cylinder adjacent the upper end thereof.

3. In an apparatus for irradiating liquids with active rays including a rotatable hollow cylinder disposed with respect to the vertical to provide for gravity induced liquid flow from the upper internal surface thereof to the lower internal surface thereof, the combination of a cup-like receiver having inner and outer walls defining a central opening surrounded by an annular liquid receiving chamber, spout means extending from said annular chamber for discharging irradiated liquid therefrom, means for removably supporting said receiver with said outer wall surrounding the lower end of said cylinder in spaced relation thereto and with said inner wall extending into said cylinder, an active ray emitting tube within said cylinder having a ray emitting portion thereof extending through said central opening in spaced relation to said inner wall whereby air passing through said central opening is subjected to active rays before entering said cylinder, and means for introducing a liquid to be irradiated onto the inner surface of said cylinder adjacent the upper end thereof.

4. In an apparatus for irradiating liquids with active rays including a rotatable hollow cylinder disposed with respect to the vertical to provide for gravity induced liquid flow from the upper internal surface thereof to the lower internal surface thereof, the combination of a cup-like receiver having inner and outer walls defining a central opening surrounded by an annular liquid receiving chamber, means for supporting said receiver with said outer wall surrounding the lower end of said cylinder in spaced relation thereto, shield means including a member carried by said cylinder and extending over the upper end of the space between said cylinder and said outer wall, an active ray emitting tube within said cylinder having the lower end thereof extending through said central opening, and means for introducing a liquid to be irradiated onto the inner surface of said cylinder adjacent the upper end thereof.

5. In an apparatus for irradiating liquids with active rays including a rotatable hollow cylinder disposed with respect to the vertical to provide for gravity induced liquid fiow from the upper internal surface thereof to the lower internal surface thereof, the combination of a cup-like receiver having inner and outer walls of substantial height defining a central opening surrounded by an annular liquid receiving chamber, means for removably supporting said receiver with said outer wall surrounding the lower end of said cylinder in spaced relation thereto and with said inner wall extending into said cylinder, shield means including a member carried by said cylinder and extending over the upper end of the space between said cylinder and said outer wall, an active ray emitting tube within said cylinder having a ray emitting portion thereof extending through said central opening, and means for introducing a liquid to be irradiated onto the inner surface of said cylinder adjacent the upper end thereof.

6. In an apparatus for irradiating liquids with active rays including a rotatable hollow cylinder disposed with respect to the vertical to provide for gravity induced liquid flow from the upper inter nal surface thereof to the lower internal surface thereof, the combination of a cup-like receiver having inner and outer walls defining a central opening surrounded by an annular liquid receiving chamber, spout means extending from said annular chamber for discharging irradiated liquid therefrom, means for removably supporting said receiver with said outer wall surrounding the lower end .of said cylinder in spaced relation thereto and with said inner wall extending into said cylinder, shield means including a member carried by said cylinder and extending over the upper end of the space between said cylinder and said outer wall, an active ray emitting tube within said cylinder having a ray emitting portion thereof extending through said central opening in spaced relation to said inner wall whereby air passing through said central opening is subjected to active rays before entering said cylinder, and means for introducing a liquid to be irradiated onto the inner surface of said cylinder adjacent the upper end thereof.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Henri et a1. Nov. 24, 1914 Goodall Apr. 27, 1926 Campsie Nov. 13, 1934 Berndt et a1. Mar. 2, 1937 Johnston June 7, 1938 OBrien Feb. 21, 1939

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1118006 *Feb 13, 1911Nov 24, 1914R U V Company IncApparatus for treating liquids with ultra-violet rays.
US1582677 *Jan 22, 1925Apr 27, 1926Goodall Fred EMachine for treating foods and other substances with rays
US1980971 *Feb 15, 1934Nov 13, 1934Harold G CampsieMethod for synthesis of vitamin d
US2072417 *Jan 19, 1934Mar 2, 1937R U V Engineering CorpMethod of irradiating substances with active rays
US2119784 *Jul 16, 1935Jun 7, 1938Int Harvester CoLiquid sterilizing device
US2147857 *Feb 1, 1933Feb 21, 1939Brian O'brienMethod of irradiating liquids
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3182193 *Jan 3, 1962May 4, 1965Ultra Dynamics CorpElectronically monitored liquid purification or sterilizing system
US5665320 *Nov 3, 1992Sep 9, 1997Ogoshi; MakotoDecomposition method for halogenated compound and decomposition apparatus therefor
US5947114 *Feb 6, 1996Sep 7, 1999Yeda Research And Development Company Ltd.Central solar receiver with a multi component working medium
Classifications
U.S. Classification250/433, 422/186.3
International ClassificationA23L3/26, A23L3/28, B01J19/12
Cooperative ClassificationA23L3/28, B01J19/123
European ClassificationA23L3/28, B01J19/12D2