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Publication numberUS2729080 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 3, 1956
Filing dateFeb 7, 1952
Priority dateFeb 7, 1952
Publication numberUS 2729080 A, US 2729080A, US-A-2729080, US2729080 A, US2729080A
InventorsHerbert L Bennett
Original AssigneeDixie Cup Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Paper cup holder
US 2729080 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 3, 1956 H, BENNETT 2,729,080

PAPER CUP HOLDER Filed Feb. 7, 1952 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 6 &1: .5

Jan. 3, 1956 H. 1.. BENNETT 2,729,080

PAPER CUP HOLDER Filed Feb. 7, 1952 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 .ZUVEJYL UP M Jan. 3, 1956 BENNETT 2,729,080

PAPER CUP HOLDER Filed Feb. 7. 1952 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 United t es Patflt PAPER CUP HOLDER I-lerbertL. Bennett, Easton, Pa assignor to Dixie Cup Compan'y, Easton, Pa., a corporation of Delaware Application February 7, ;1952,'Ser'ia l No. 270,480 5 Claims. or. 65-61 flfhis invention relates to improvements in a paper cup holder, andmore particularly to a paper cup holder of up holders for paper cups have been developed, These holders are mostly used in soda fountains and similar locations where various types of hot and cold drinks are individually dispensed. The paperrcups are usually kept 'in stacked nested relationship on the back bar, frequently with the stack inverted, and the clerk or operator grasps a holder by .the bottom, presses it axially over the terminal fcupl'of the stack, and a gripping element in the holder automatically grips and retainsthat terminal cup in the holder and holds it therein during the entire use of the cup egainst accidental dislodgement. Holders of this type heretofore known have not always proven successful to a desired extent, owing to the fact that it was extremely difficult to remove and replace a gripping element when desired, andespecially due to, the fact that the gripping elements were not of a character to be used on cups of different shapes. That is, the same gripping element would not function with a cup substantially of a true conical shape, and also function 'witha eupjhavinga widely blunted apical portion, or with a flat bottom cup. Sometimes the grippers would not funcjtion with a one-piece cup and also a two-piece cup. Further, holders of this type heretofore known were not as economical in construction as is desired, a highly important factor, and the gripping, elements were "not as positive inaction as desired, and frequently relatively short lived.

With the foregoing in mind, it is an important object of the instant invention to provide an automatic-pickup holder for paper cups, which holder is very econor'nicali'n constructionand includes a simplified form of cup grip ping element operating upon a new principle providing a highly elfective and positive'grip u'pon theci ip.

Also an object of this invention is the provision of a pickup holder for paper cups embodying a gripping elemeht in the form of a resilient diaphragm, that 'is simple in form, economical in construction,'and so shaped and disposed in the holder as to effect an extremely positive grip on the cup, whether or not the gripping element is wet or dry. v t

A further feature of the invention resides in the provision of a pickup holder for paper cups embodying a gripping element capable of handling cups ofdifiei'eht formations, and which is readily and easily placed in and removed from the holder. I t v v A furthertfcature of the invention resides infthe provision of a pickup holder for paper cups embodying a molded resilient gripping element of a predetermined shape, and which element is so mounted in the holder'as to distort it from its natural shape to thereby enhance its p -P we 1 'Anothepobject of the invention resides in the provision Qfisfl iii k pt d r o P p q v mh ns pp element in the form of a molded resilient disc having e centralaperture through whichthe lower portion ,of ,a paper cup extends, the disc being molded so as to have a natural form in which the dis'c isdished in one direction to assume substantially the shape 'of-a truhcated cone, ,b u t when tlie disc is mounted in the holder, it isdishedinithe opposite direction whilerconfined in the holder so that ,thenormalftendency of the disc to assume its natural shape augments its gripping action on apaper cup, I h Another feature of the i nstant invention residesi'n the q i a of a pi ku ho s ri na u s h in n internal groove in the Wall of the holder, into which a simple form of, inolded gripping eleinent may be readily snpcdi u t 4 l a V S tilt another feature of the invention resides in the provision of a pickup holder for paper cups having an internal 'gi'oove into which a resilient molded gripping Telerrtent may bereadily seated, the gripping element having a natural eoneavo-convex, formation prior to being placed in the, holder b ut after being seated in the groove the tgrippi g element is concave-convex in the opposite d r t onr a. I It is also an object of, this invention to provide a pickup t pe holder forpaper cups, which, holder has a resilient gripping element therein which has a natural shape dished inone directiombut which is dished in the opposite 'direc vv enen nsa bt. f v

v Still"a nother object ,of the invention resides in the prevision of a pickup vtype holder for paper cups, which holder has a resilient pwardly dished sup gripping elememenmeieauy loosely mounted inside the holder to permitthe element to become dished in the opposite directiqn when eaga' edtiy acne. v V, 'ne soine o'ffthemore salient features,'charaeteristics and a vantages, of theinstant invention have been above pointed outgethersfvyin become a parent from the foll wing fclosiir'es, takenin'conjuiiction with the accompaaygurawmgsun which+ t Fi re l f'is" 'n'tr'al f'vert'ical sectional view through a pickup, older odyifig principles of the instant i nvennon showing it e, sar'n'e operatively carrying a paper cup a widely liluhte'd apical portion; h v

"'tly enlarged plan viw'of the pickup ng'the' msei 't; separate from the holder; E lie 3 "is ,a still further enlarged central vertieal secgiewt game ickup element of Fig. 2, showing the meta its 'at'u r'al shape prior to being placed in the fraghieh'tary enlargement of-the, central 1 with the amp omitted and showing i the I v e in the shape it must assume upon being confined in the newer; I

Figure eris a somewhat diagrammatic view showing the holder yertical sectipmwith the conical paper cup in elevation just prior to being engaged by the gripping eleeat, n he h cm. h Figure jsja view similar to Fig. 5, but showing the paper cup after engagement by the gripping element in the holder; g

Figure 7 is a view of the same character as Figs. '5 and 6-, illii'strating the operation of the pickup holder when a force is applied to the cup tending to remove the cup from the'holder'; V I V 1 LF-i'gure is a somewhat diagrammatic view, of a modifieii'form er the invention, in'whi'ch the holder arid pickup element is shown in vertical section, a'ndth'e cup'tneler1; embodied in the holder of Fig.

vation just prior to the time the cup is engaged by or seated within the holder; and

Figure 9 is similar in character to Fig. 8, but showing the cup in elevation and seated within the holder.

As shown on the drawings:

In the illustrated embodiment of the instant invention,

there is shown a holder embodying a hollow body part 1 provided with a cup receiving cavity 2 in its upper portion, and the lower portion of which functions as a base upon which to set the holder, the cup and its contents. Obviously, the holder may be given any desired configuration, but a generally hour glass shape is preferable when dealing with conical paper cups, such shape more nearly approximating the cylindrical in the event flat bottom cups are to be held in the holder. Equally as obviously, the holder may be made or fabricated from several pieces of material if so desired, that is the base portion and the part having the cup receiving cavity may be initially separate pieces secured together, and the holder may be made of any desirable material, both metal and thermosetting plastic being satisfactory examples.

Herein where the term body is used in connection with the holder, that term is to be construed as meaning in general the holder itself including both the upper cup receiving portion and the base.

In the upper portion of the cup receiving cavity 2, the internal face of the holder body 1 is preferably provided with a land 3 shaped to intimately fit the outer conical surface of the cup itself. Therebelow, it is not necessary that the cup contact any portion of the body part of the holder per se. The holder is also provided with an internal groove 4 defined by a pair of spaced side walls preferably horizontal, and a base Wall 5 which preferably approaches the vertical, although it may be at a slight angle to the vertical, say five degrees, for example. In the present construction, such groove is all that is necessary to hold the gripping insert now about to be described.

With reference more particularly to Figs. 2, 3 and 4, it will be seen that the gripping insert in the illustrated embodiment is molded from resilient material, rubber or synthetic rubber being highly satisfactory for the purpose. The molded and natural shape of the insert which is generally indicated by numeral 6, is that shown in Figs. 2 and 3. The insert is in the form of a diaphragm, upwardly dished or bowed as clearly seen in Fig. 3, and having a central aperture 7 defined by a common meeting line between upper and lower converging beveled surfaces 8 and 9. From this aperture, the disc very gradually thickens toward a definitely enlarged or thickened portion 10 spaced inwardly from the normal circumferential edge of the disc. This portion on its underside has a relatively wide and deep beveled surface 11, inside of which is an upwardly and inwardly extending portion 12 which merges with a conical wall 13 leading to the bevel 9. On the upper external surface, there are twowall areas 14 and 15 at slightly different angles to the horizontal, conjointly providing a downwardly sloping upper surface from the beveled surface 8 to a relatively sharp circumferential edge further defined by the aforesaid surface 11. Obviously said edge has a diameter greater than that of the groove 4.

When the insert is snapped into the aforesaid groove 4 in the body part of the holder, the original beveled surface 11 is forced into substantially intimate contact with the almost vertical base or bottom wall 5 of the groove, and caused to assume a substantially upright position and the portion 12 is caused to assume a substantially horizontal position along the lower wall of the groove, as seen in Fig. 1. Being so confined in the holder, the insert is caused to assume a distorted shape and to become dished or bowed in the opposite direction as exaggeratedly illustrated in Fig. 4. The insert, therefore, possesses an inherent tendency to assume its molded or natural shape of Figs. 2 and 3, but is prevented from doing so by being confined in the holder.

In Fig. 1 I have illustrated the holder operatively carrying a paper cup 16 having a widely blunted or rounded apical portion 17, the gripping insert 6 positively engaging the cup in lower portion thereof above the blunted end 17. This engagement is accomplished merely by a relative axial movement between the cup and holder, the lower portion of the cup passing through the aforesaid aperture 7 in the insert.

In Figs. 5, 6 and 7 I have illustrated the operation of the holder, and in this instance I have shown a conical cup 18 having a relatively sharp or very slightly blunted apex 19. The selection of the cup 18 is for two purposes, first to indicate that the same insert 6 will handle either form of cup with equal facility, and secondly for purposes of clarity in illustrating the action of the holder.

in Fig. 5, the cup is about to enter into engagement with the insert, and the insert is in its deformed position, but the position which it must assume when confined in the holder. In Fig. 6, the cup is seated in the holder against the land 3 in the upper part thereof, and the insert has established effective engagement with the lower portion of the cup. It will be noted that the insert is downwardly deformed to a greater extent than in Fig. 5, since the cup entering the aperture 7 tends to increase the diameter of that aperture, and this can only be accomplished by a further dishing of the insert itself. This further dishing of the insert together with the inherent tendency of the insert to assume its natural shape (Figs. 2 and 3) establishes a positive grip upon the cup.

Any force tending to remove the cup from the holder will cause a buckling effect in the insert as illustrated at 2t) in Fig. 7 in a rather exaggerated manner. When properly seated in the holder, the cup is against the upper surface 8 of the insert adjacent the aperture 7, and as stated above the aperture has been stretched slightly upon reception of the cup. Consequently, a force tending to remove the cup from the holder causes the insert to move along with the cup and tend to assume its natural shape, but the edge between the beveled surfaces 8 and 9 at the opening 7 cannot pass by the cup, owing to the confinement of the insert, and the insert tends to buckle and thereby more forcibly holds the cup in place.

This holding of the cup by the insert, is not of such great strength that the cup cannot be intentionally removed from the holder, and that intentional removal is best effected by pressing with the thumb on the apex of the cup. However, the gripping action of the insert is amply sufficient to prevent any accidental or unintentional dislodgement of the cup from the holder. It is also apparent from the above description, that were the opening 7 of any other character than round, or in accordance with the contour of the cup wall, the holding power of the insert would not be as great.

While the structure above described in connection with Figs. 1 to 7 inclusive exemplifies a preferred form of the invention, another satisfactorily operating form is disclosed in Figs. 8 and 9. In these figures, a cup holder including a body 21 of the same general configuration as the holder body 1 previously described, has a cup receiving cavity 22 therein, and is provided with an internal annular groove 23 in the body wall. In this instance, however, the groove 23 in the holder body is slightly deeper and slightly wider than the groove 4, above described.

The same pickup insert or gripping element 6 is utilized in the holder structure of Figs. 8 and 9, but owing to the greater size of the groove 23, there is a relatively loose fit of the pickup insert 6 in the groove, and the pickup insert may be said to be somewhat floatingly mounted. Owing to this loose fit, the pickup insert 6 when placed in the holder remains in its normal upwardly dished shape, the same shape as seen in Fig. 3. The insert retains its natural shape, as seen in Fig. 8, until actually contacted or brought into contact with a paper cup, such for example as the cup 18. Upon contact with the cup, when the holder is pressed over the cup or the cup is pushed into the holder, as the case may be, the insert reverses its position and assumes the downwardly dished shape seen in Fig. 9. The size of the groove 23 permits the necessary shifting of the outer marginal portion of the insert when it reverses its dished shape.

While as first glance, it might appear as though the insert would revert to its normal shape after being engaged by the cup, and thus push the cup out of the holder, such action cannot happen. From the showing in Fig. 9, it will be noted that there must be a stretching of the central opening in the insert in order for it to assume its natural shape, and the insert cannot by its own inherent tendency accomplish that stretching. No actual contact by any part of the insert with the base wall of the groove 23 is necessary in order for the insert to satisfactorily hold and retain the cup against accidental dislodgement. In order to hold the cup, only sufiicient force is necessary to cause the insert to reverse its dished form. However, there will always be more force than that applied, especially when an operator places the inverted holder over the terminal cup of a stack of inverted cups in serving a soft drink or the like. The operators forceful push will not only reverse the insert, but will tend to enlarge the aperture in the insert, and thereby more effectively lock the cup in the holder. That slight additional force,over and above that just necessary to reverse the insert, is sufficient to provide the insert with a gripping action on the cup more than enough to sustain the cup against accidental dislodgement during normal usage.

From the foregoing, it is apparent that I have provided a highly economical, and highly eflicient automatic pickup holder for paper cups of various sizes and shapes. The gripping insert itself is simply molded from resilient material, is extremely economical, and may readily be snapped into or out of the groove 4 or groove 23 in the respective holder bodies. Preferably, the insert is of such size in the first described embodiment that there is a rather minute space between the bevel 11 of the insert and the base wall 5 of the holder groove when the insert is in position. Sizing these parts in that manner, to provide such a minute space, facilitates the removal and positioning of the insert.

It will be understood that modifications and variations may be effected without departing from the scope of the novel concepts of the present invention.

I claim as my invention:

1. A cup holder comprising a tubular body having an annular groove therein which groove includes a substantially vertical bottom wall and upper and lower side walls, a molded resilient disc having a central aperture therein and a circumferential edge at least partially defined by a normally beveled surface on the underside of the disc and which edge has a diameter greater than that of said groove, said disc having a normally dished shape, and said beveled surface being of a width approximately the distance between the side walls of said groove, said normally beveled surface being held in an upright position substantially parallel to the bottom wall of the groove when the disc is inserted in the groove thereby holding the disc dished in the opposite direction to enhance its gripping action on a cup extending through said aperture.

2. As an article of manufacture, a cup gripping element for insertion in a paper cup holder, comprising a resilient disc upwardly bowed and having a central opening therein, said disc prior to insertion in a holder having an outwardly and downwardly sloping upper surface and an upwardly and outwardly beveled margin on the lower surface meeting said upper surface at the circumferential edge of the disc.

3. As an article of manufacture, a cup gripping element for insertion in a paper cup holder, comprising a resilient disc upwardly bowed and having a central opening therein, said disc prior to insertion in a holder having an outwardly and downwardly sloping upper surface and an upwardly and outwardly beveled margin on the lower surface meeting said upper surface at the circumferential edge of the disc, said central opening being defined by two other upwardly and downwardly intersecting beveled surfaces.

4. As an article of manufacture, a cup gripping element for insertion in a paper cup holder, comprising a molded resilient disc upwardly bowed and having a central opening therein, said disc prior to insertion in a holder having a thickened portion tapering outwardly to a narrower circumferential edge, and said disc gradually decreasing in thickness inwardly of said portion to said opening.

5. A cup holder comprising a tubular body having an annular groove on the inside thereof, a resilient dished disc having a central aperture therein to grippingly receive a part of a cup seated in the holder, the upper surface of said disc sloping downwardly to a relatively sharp circumferential edge further defined by an annular beveled surface on the underside and which edge has a diameter greater than that of said groove, said annular surface being held in an upright position when said disc is inserted in said groove to hold the disc dished in the opposite direction against its inherent restorative tendency and enhance the gripping action of the disc on a cup extending through said aperture.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 913,286 Heeter Feb. 23, 1909 963,645 Pendleton July 5, 1910 1,634,891 Trout July 5, 1927 1,918,810 Hinderliter July 18, 1933 1,956,692 McWane May 1, 1934 1,957,263 Gray May 1, 1934 2,215,377 Penfield et a1 Sept. 17, 1940 2,278,347 Cope, Jr Mar. 31, 1942 2,486,907 Amberg et al Nov. 1, 1949 2,487,014 Amberg Nov. 1, 1949 2,509,134 Carew May 23, 1950 2,570,954 Kasman Oct. 9, 1951 FOREIGN PATENTS 9,676 Great Britain Apr. 29, 1903

Patent Citations
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US913286 *Mar 10, 1908Feb 23, 1909Delbert L HeeterDevice for gathering rod-wax.
US963645 *Oct 1, 1909Jul 5, 1910John S PendletonPacking for piston-rods.
US1634891 *Nov 9, 1922Jul 5, 1927Trout William APacking device
US1918810 *Mar 30, 1932Jul 18, 1933Hinderliter Frank JCasing head with blowout preventer
US1956692 *Nov 28, 1930May 1, 1934Mcwane Cast Iron Pipe CompanyPipe joint and packing ring therefor
US1957263 *Sep 13, 1933May 1, 1934Gray Lois BReceptacle protector
US2215377 *May 2, 1939Sep 17, 1940Shell DevMud wiper
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US2486907 *Jul 13, 1946Nov 1, 1949Lily Tulip Cup CorpHolder for paper cups
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3009381 *Nov 27, 1957Nov 21, 1961Illinois Tool WorksStud and dished plastic fastening element
US3207461 *May 10, 1963Sep 21, 1965American Can CoCup holder
US3327363 *May 3, 1965Jun 27, 1967Dzus Fastener CoFastener and retainer assembly
US3709429 *Oct 19, 1970Jan 9, 1973Friedly ECentrifuges
US4271878 *Oct 31, 1977Jun 9, 1981Elvis BologaLiquid transfer device
US4431038 *Mar 5, 1981Feb 14, 1984Rome Philip LActuating holder for combined electric eraser-pencil sharpeners
US4919381 *Feb 9, 1989Apr 24, 1990Buist Ronald WCup holder
US5071096 *Jan 29, 1991Dec 10, 1991Cobbs Manufacturing Co.Drink container stabilizing device
US6202970 *Aug 27, 1999Mar 20, 2001Ronald DunbarDripping object holder
US6708978 *Jul 18, 2001Mar 23, 2004The Lee CompanyProcess for sealing or reducing holes, and connecting holes with a tube end
US6863276 *Oct 9, 2001Mar 8, 2005The Lee CompanyDevice for sealing or reducing holes, and connecting holes with a tube end
US7556230 *Oct 20, 2006Jul 7, 2009S.G. Enterprises, Inc.Holder for beverage containers
WO2009129973A1 *Apr 20, 2009Oct 29, 2009MÜHLBAUER, AlineCup and manufacturing method therefor
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/145.3, 277/641, 277/644, 248/314, 24/545
International ClassificationA47G23/02
Cooperative ClassificationA47G23/0216
European ClassificationA47G23/02A2