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Publication numberUS2729874 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 10, 1956
Filing dateJul 10, 1953
Priority dateJul 10, 1953
Publication numberUS 2729874 A, US 2729874A, US-A-2729874, US2729874 A, US2729874A
InventorsMccreary John
Original AssigneeMccreary John
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tenter
US 2729874 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. MCCREARY Jan. l0, 1956 TENTER 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed July 10, 1953 l Il Il l A Jan. l0, 1956 J. MGCREARY 2,729,874

lTIEINTER Filed July 10, 1953 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 f4 2f 25 fa .fm/ev? tor: {ZJ/277 JVC fr y M His #ttor/args.

Jan. l0, 1956 J. MCCREARY 2,729,874

TENTER med July 1o, 195s 4 sheets-sheet s "E il In wumlmumll 1mm /n vena-0r.' .fabry/V667? Gf, A W 0f t V/ 5%5' ta/Ways 45 -umm J. MCCREARY Jan. 10, 1956 TENTER 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed .July 1o, 195s United States arent O TENTER John McCreary, Cohoes, N. Y. Application July 10, 1953, Serial No. 367,364

Claims. (Cl. 26--61) My invention relates to tenters which are used for the drying and setting of fabrics to a pre-determined width.

More particularly, it relates to improvements at the feeding end of the tenter whereby the fabrics, which are initially of much less width than that to which they are to be stretched and set, may be fed directly into the tenter and thereafter gradually and uniformly stretched to the required width attwhich they are dried and set.

One of the objects of my invention is to provide a means whereby the beds which support the tenter chains adjacent the feeding end of the device may be swung towards each other so that, at the point where the fabric is fed to the machine, the spacing of the adjacent runs of the chains to which the fabric is attached may be adjusted to conform substantially to the width of the fabric in its initial condition. Another object is to provide a means whereby each of the chain guides will form a substantially smooth continuous path for the rollers on the chains throughout the zones where the angular movement of the chains is changing when the beds at the feeding end of the machine are angularly-disposed to each other instead of parallel. A further object of the invention is to provide an improved type of means for pivotally connecting the swinging portions of the beds to the other portions thereof whereby a substantially unlimited swinging movement thereof may be provided without breaks in the surfaces on which the rollers in the chains travel. p

I accomplish these objects by the means described below and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which- Fig. 1 is a top plan view of my tenter;

Fig. 2 is a side elevation thereof;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged plan view of the feeding end of the device;

Fig. 4is a fragmentary plan view of one of the beds which supports one of the chains and showing the means for pivotally connecting the swinging portions of the bed with the other portion thereof;

Fig. 5 is a section of Fig. 4 in the plane 5--5;

Fig. 6 is a section of Fig. 4 in the plane 6 6;

Fig. 7 is a view similar to Fig. 4, but showing the relative positions of the parts after that portion of the bed which is adjacent the feeding end of the tenter has been swung and is angularly-disposed to the other portion of the bed; and

Fig. 8 is an enlarged, fragmentary section of a bed and a run of the chains showing a modified type of roller and a modified type of guide therefor.

Referring to the drawings and first-to Figs. l and 2 thereof- 1 represents the entire device in a more or less schematic manner. 2 is the fabric which is being withdrawn from the container 3 and secured to the tenter chains by means, represented generally by the numeral 4, which is of no material importance insofar as this invention is concerned and therefore will not be described. The tenter chains carry thefabric through the drying compartment S 'ice 2 and the setting compartment 6, after which it is rolled up, as shown at 7.

Referring now more particularly to Figs. 3, 8 and 9 represent generally the beds which support and guide the tenter chains and which are ordinarily disposed in fixed parallel relation to each other when the device is in operation although it is to be understood that the transverse spacing between the beds and the chains thereon may be varied by the usual means (not shown) whereby the adjacent runs of the two chains may be adjusted to the size to which the fabric is to be set. As pointed out above, the fabric 2, which may have been dyed or, at least, is in wet condition when attached to the tenter chains, is ordinarily of much narrower width than that to which it is to be stretched and set. Therefore, the operation of drying and setting the fabric to a predetermined width will be greatly facilitated if the ends of the chain-supporting beds adjacent the feeding end of the machine are arranged to swing towards each other so that, at the point where the fabric is first attached thereto, the distance between the chains may be adjusted to con form substantially to the initial width of the fabric. Thereafter, the fabric will be uniformly stretched, as the chains diverge, to the width at which it is to be set.

Since those runs of the two chains which are adjacent each other and to which the fabric is attached serve to stretch the fabric to its setting width and thereafter maintain it at said width during the drying and setting thereof, the beds which carry the chains must be provided with some upstanding means for preventing the tension of the fabric from drawing these runs of the chains closer together. Each of the beds is therefore provided with two channels, such as shown at 1i) and 11 in Figs. 4, 6 and 7, which are formed by upstanding members 12 and 13 carried by the beds and between which the chains 14 and 15 run. These chains are provided with rollers 16 which are rotatably mounted on the vertical pins 17 which connect the links of the chain together. Secured to the chains are spaced plates 18 carrying a plurality of upstanding tenter pins 19 adjacent the outer edges thereof.

The major portions of the beds 8 and 9 are straight and parallel to each other and it is to be understood that the spacing between the beds may be varied by the usual means (not shown). Adjacent the feeding end of the machine however, the beds are formed of sections represented generally by Zt and 21 which are pivotally connected to the straight, parallel-disposed sections 8 and 9 of the beds at the points 22 and 23, by means which will be described in detail below.

Since the upstanding portions 12 and 13 of the beds forrn the guides or tracks upon which the rollers of the chain roll, there ought not to be any breaks of substantial length in these guides. It will also be apparent that, if these upstanding portions or for that matter, any other portions of the` separate end sections Ztl and 21, were in abutting relation with the straight, parallel-disposed portions 8 and 9 of the beds, it would be impossible to swing the sections 20 and 21 towards or away from each other about an axis disposed midway between the guides on said beds. Therefore, there must be spaces between each of the separate sections Ztl and 2l and the other portion of the bed of which it is a part. Furthermore, it will be apparent that, even without any clearance between the sections of the beds on the outer or relatively remote sides thereof, breaks of substantial length will be created in the tracks of the outer runs of said chains when the sections 20 and 21 are swung towards each other.

The end sections Ztl and 21 of the bed may be pivotally connected at a single point only to the parallel portions of the beds but, the extent to which said sections may then be swung towards each other is obviously limited 3 bythe clearances which are permissible between the portions of said beds at each side of their pivotal connections.

While it is .understood that I may use only one pivotal connection'between each of said end sections and the other portion of the bed associated therewith, I prefer to use at least two, longitudinally-spaced, pivotal connections therebetween so that the total clearance, lwhich mustbe provided between the ends of the roller guides or tracks in order to provide a swinging of said sections towards each other to the desired extent, is distributed through two, longitudinally-spaced zones so that the length of the breaks in the lroller guides or tracks is only one-half of that which would be necessary with a single pivotal connection.

Referring now more particularly to Figs. 4, 5 and 6, I have Yhere illustrated in detail the means by which a section 20 is pivotally connected to the other portion of the bedfor the chain 14 and it is to be understood that the connection between the section 21 and the other portion of the bed for thechain 15 is substantially identical therewith. Thus, there is provided between -section and the other portion of the bed of the chain 14, what may-be designatedas three links 24, and 26.

The links 26 are xed to the end of the straight, parallel-disposed portions of the beds 8 and 9, while the links 24 are fixed to the swingable end sections of the beds. The links 24 and 26 are pivotally connected to the link 25 by means of the bolts 22 and 23. The cross section of the link 25 in a longitudinally-extending, ver tical plane through the centerthereof may be said to approximate in shape an inverted Z in which the upper portion 42 thereof is approximately semicylindrical in plan and fits in asemicylindrical recess 43 in the link 26. Between the portion 42 and the bottom of the recess 43 is a ball thrust bearing 44. The portion 45 of the link 24 is similar to the portion 42 of the link 26 and overlies the portion 46 of the link 25 with a ball thrust bearing 47 therebetween.

It will be apparent from a consideration of Fig. 4, that when the section 20 is in alignment with the other portion of the bed of the Vchain 14, there are substantial spaces 27, 28, 29 and 30 between said links at each side of the centers thereof. The upstanding portions 12 and 13 which form'the guides or tracks for the rollers on the chain 14 both on the section 2t? and the other portion of thebed, are in alignment with each other but there are substantial spaces between Ythe ends 310i the upstanding element .13 and also between the ends 32 of the upstanding element 12. space, I provide the link 25 with upstanding portions 33 and V34 which are aligned,'respectively, with the upstanding portions 13 and 12, toprovide guides .for the rollers when they are crossing the link 25.

There are, however, substantial breaks inthe roller guides between thelink i25 and the links 24 and26. In order to bridge these last mentioned spaces and to provide continuous guides or tracks for the rollers, I position, within said channels againstthe inner sides of the upstanding portions 12 and 13, fiat, resilient strips such as shown at 35, 36, 37 and 38, which are secured at one end only to said upstanding portions, as shown at 39, 40, 41 and 41', so that they may slide in said channels when the sections 20 and 21 are swung toward each other as shownin Fig. 7.

In the figures which have been discussed above, it will be apparent that the chains merely slide on the bottoms of the guiding channels aithough the rollers may roll'on one side or the other of the upstanding portions of said channels. In order to eliminate the frictional loss result ing from such slidindg, I have shown in Fig. 8, a preferred form of roller and a preferred form of a track therefor which may be applied at least to the adjacent runs of said chains to which a fabric in tension is normally attached when the device is in operation and which tends In order to reduce this to pull said adjacent runs ofV said chains towards each other. Here, the rollers instead of having cylindrical, lateral surfaces, as shown in'Fig. 6, have lateral surfaces 48 which are spherical, and the upstanding portions of the beds 49 which form the tracks for these rollers, at least on the sides of the two beds'which are adjacent each other, are provided with a longitudinally-extending, cylindrical groove 50 having a radius slightly larger than the radius of the spherical surfaces 48 of the rollers. The axes of the cylinders of which the .grooves 50 are a part, are disposed slightly above the locus of the centers of the spherical portions of the rollers of thoseY runs of the chains which are adapted to cooperate therewith when said chains are resting on the portions 51 of the beds immediately under them. When a fabric is stretched between the inner run of the chain 14 and the inner run of the chain 15, the tension thereon tends to pullrthe chains towards each other or towards theupstanding guide members 49. Thus, when the spherical surfaced rollers move into contact with the upstanding members 49, they will move upwardly into the grooves 50 and roll therein, thus eliminating the friction between the bottoms ofthe chains and the beds on whichthey are normally supported when the tenter is out of operation.

It is to be understood that the usual means, not shown, is provided for moving the parallel-disposed portions 8 and 9 ofthe-beds towards and away from each other. In Fig. 3, I have shown similar means, comprising the right and lefthand worms 52 and 53, for swinging the movable end sections about their vpivotal connections to the parallel-disposed portions of the tenter.

While I have described my invention in its preferred embodiment, it is to be understood that the words which I have used are words of description rather than `of limitation and that changes, within the purview of theappended claims, may bemade without departing from the true scope and spirit 'of my invention in its broader aspects.

What I claim isl. A tenter comprising two, horizontally-spaced,chainsupporting beds each comprising two,'horiZontally-spaced channels adapted laterally to confine the runs of vthe chain supported on said bed; eachof said beds, adjacent Y the feeding end of said tenter, comprising a separate section longitudinally-spaced from the balance of said bed; a chainy comprising a multiplicity of linksy provided with tenter pins and rollers thereon supported on each of said bedsV withinV said channels; -said rollers having vertical axes adapting them to roll on the sides of said channels when in contact therewithylinks Vpivotally connecting each of said separate sections at a plurality of vpoints to the adjacent portion of the bed of which it is a part to swing laterally towards and away from the other bed; said links having channels'thereon forming longitudinally-spaced extensions of the channels on said bed; and flexible means in saidchannels forming extensions of the side walls of said channels and bridging the spaces therebetween.

2. A tenter comprising two, horizontally-spaced chainsupporting beds each comprising two, horizontallyspaced channels adapted laterally to confine the runs of the chain supported on said bed; each of said beds, adjacent the feeding end of said tenter, comprising a separate section longitudinally-spaced from the balanceof said bed; a chain comprising a multiplicityof links provided with tenter pins androllers thereonsupported on each of said beds within said channels; said rollers havingvertical axes adapting them to roll on the sides of said channels when in Contact therewith; links pivotallyconnecting each of said separate sections at a plurality of longitudinallyspaced points midway between the channels thereon to the adjacent portion of the bed of rwhich it s afpartv to swing Y springs in said channels forming extensions of the side walls thereof and bridging the spaces therebetween; said springs being secured at one point only to the channel side wall of which it is an extension.

3. A tenter comprising a pair of horizontally-spaced roller chains each comprising a multiplicity of links having tenter pins thereon; horizontally-spaced beds having horizontal surfaces on which each run of each chain is supported, and upstanding surfaces cooperating with the rollers on the adjacent runs of said chains for maintaining said runs in predetermined spaced relation when a fabric is attached to the pins thereon; said beds and said chains being parallel-disposed throughout the major portion of the length thereof, but said beds, adjacent the feeding end of said tenter, comprising separate, longitudinallyspaced sections; means pivotally connecting said sections together to swing towards and away from each other; and roller guiding means within said beds bridging the spaces between said sections; said rollers being mounted on vertical axes and having spherical lateral surfaces; and said upstanding surfaces which cooperate with said rollers having a longitudinally extending groove therein which is arcuate in cross section, of a radius slightly greater than the radius of the spherical surfaces of said rollers, and has its axis spaced slightly above the locus of the centers of said surfaces when said chains are resting on said horizontal surfaces.

4. The structure set forth in claim 3 in which the roller guiding means are resilient strips of metal.

5. In a tenter of the character described, the combination with a first and second chain each having rollers therein with spherical lateral surfaces rotatably mounted on vertical axes, and pins on said chains for attaching thereto a fabric to be stretched in said tenter; of a pair of horizontally spaced beds for supporting said chains; and upstanding means on each of said beds cooperating with the rollers on the chain supported thereby for maintaining the runs of said chains in horizontally spaced relation; said upstanding means which maintains in spaced relation to each other those runs of said chains to which a fabric being treated in said tenter is attached being provided with means cooperating with the spherical surfaces of the rollers in the chains of the last mentioned runs for raising said runs slightly above the surfaces of their supporting beds when said fabric is stretched between said runs.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,478,454 .Renold Dec. 25, 1923 2,530,119 Dungler Nov. 14, 1950 FOREIGN PATENTS 14,378/33 Australia Oct. 18, 1934 694,192 Germany July 26, 1940

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1478454 *Oct 12, 1922Dec 25, 1923Renold Hans LtdStenter chain
US2530119 *Jan 27, 1949Nov 14, 1950Julien DunglerTentering machine
AU1437833A * Title not available
DE694192C *Mar 30, 1938Jul 26, 1940Krantz Soehne HKettenfuehrung in Gewebespannmaschinen
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3050816 *Mar 14, 1960Aug 28, 1962John MccrearyHigh speed tenter chain device
US3179976 *Sep 5, 1962Apr 27, 1965Marshall And Williams CorpApparatus for stretching webs
US4282636 *Jul 25, 1979Aug 11, 1981H. Krantz Gmbh & Co.Chain guide for a stenter
US5014402 *Jun 24, 1988May 14, 1991G. Bruckner GmbhTenter apparatus
US5255419 *Feb 20, 1991Oct 26, 1993Morrison Berkshire, Inc.Tentering apparatus and method
US7073237 *Dec 6, 2005Jul 11, 2006Parkinson Technologies, Inc.Tenter frame joint
Classifications
U.S. Classification26/91, 26/96, 26/92
International ClassificationD06C3/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06C3/00, D06C2700/04
European ClassificationD06C3/00