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Publication numberUS2731056 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 17, 1956
Filing dateApr 14, 1953
Priority dateApr 14, 1953
Publication numberUS 2731056 A, US 2731056A, US-A-2731056, US2731056 A, US2731056A
InventorsArthur H Anson
Original AssigneeArthur H Anson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Molded article
US 2731056 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 17, 1956 A. H. ANSON 2,731,056

MOLDED ARTICLE Filed April 14, 1953 INVENTOR. ARTHUR H.F-7NsoN BYXW ATTO/P/YA-Y United States Patent Office 2,731,056 Patented Jan. 17, 1956 2,731,056 MOLDED ARTICLE Arthur H. Anson, Allentown, Pa. Application April 14, 1953, Serial N0. 348,609

2 Claims. (Cl. 150-52) This invention relates generally to casings and is more particularly concerned with an improved construction thereof for application to objects for convenience in handling the same and for other purposes.

A principal object of the present invention is to provide for such casing means component parts of which are adapted for relative angular flexing movement for accommodation by said casing of objects within a predetermined range of sizes.

Another object of the present invention is to provide such a casing which is made of stretchable material and which includes means, component parts of which are adapted for relative angular flexing movement, for accommodation by said casing of objects within a predetermined range of sizes. 1

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will appear more fully hereinafter, it being understood that said invention consists substantially in the constructions as described in detail in the following specification, as shown in the accompanying drawings and as finally pointed out in the appended claims.

In the accompanying drawings, which are illustrative of preferred constructions embodying the principles of the present invention:

Figure l is a perspective view of a coaster embodying the present invention, the glass accommodated by the coaster being shown in broken lines;

Figure 2 is a plan view of the coaster shown in Figure 1, being taken on line 2--2 of Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a sectional elevation taken on line 33 of Figure 2;

Figure 4 is a perspective view of a doorknob cover embodying the present invention, the doorknob being shown in broken lines;

Figure 5 is a sectional elevation taken on line 5-5 of Figure 4; and

Figure 6 is a sectional elevation taken on line 6--6 of Figure 5.

For purposes of illustration only, referring particularly to Figures 1, 2 and 3, the present invention is shown in the form of a body 10 adapted to accommodate a glass 11 and to serve as a coaster therefor. The body 10 is provided with a fiat base wall 12 and an upright wall 13 which rises from the base wall 12 and which is generally cylindrical in form. The upright wall 13 is circumferentially divided into equal sections each of which extends longitudinally of the body 10 in the form of a pleat 14 having a pair of component parts 15 and 16 which are angularly related and which are joined together at their lower ends by a triangular wall portion 17, the several portions 17 being in turn joined with base wall 12 through the medium of an unpleated portion 18 of the upright wall 13. It will be observed that the pleats 14 project inwardly from the unpleated portion 18 of the upright wall 13.

For further illustration, referring particularly to Fig ures 4, 5 and 6, the present invention is shown in the form of a body 19 adapted to accommodate a doorknob as 'the' base-wall 21 and the neck.-23 are approached.

The coaster 10 and the doorknob cover 19 each is preferably a unitary molded-body made of somewhat elasticrubber-like material. A variety of such materials is available,-for example, plastisols, expanded plastisols,

.- foam rubber, sponge rubber and vinyl. For other products even textiles, paper and various plastics might be found suitable for use. a

With regard to the coaster 10, when the diameter of the glass 11 is only slightly greater than the inside clear diameter of the cylindrical wall 13, the longitudinally extending inwardly presenting ridges of the pleats 14 frictionally engage the side of the glass 11, thus detachably securing the coaster 10 thereto without any appreciable relative angular flexing movement of the component parts 15 and 16 of the pleats 14 and, therefore, without any appreciable expansive movement of the wall 13. When the diameter of the glass 11 is greater, the pleats 14 frictionally engage the'side of the glass 11 as aforementioned, but the outward pressure acting against the pleats I 14 is such as to cause relative angular flexing movement of the component parts 15 and 16 of the pleats 14 with a corresponding expansive movement of the wall 13 to accommodate the larger glass. When the diameter of the glass 11 is still greater, the aforementioned expansive movement of the wall 13 is augmented by stretching of the wall to the extent necessary. Accordingly, the coaster l0 accommodates glasses within a predetermined range of sizes. In addition, a glass is quickly and easily placed in the coaster 10, is removably secured therein and is quickly and easily detached therefrom. Furthermore, the coaster 10 cushions the bottom portion of the glass against breakage, at the same time that it provides a good gripping area for the hand and prevents slipping and clattering.

Still further, when the coaster 10 is made of an absorbent material such as foam rubber, it absorbs the moisture from the glass to protect the surface upon which it is placed. It will be understood that when the coaster 10 is made of a material which is not water-absorbent a pad which is made of suitable absorbent material may be interposed between the bottom of the glass and that of the coaster to take up the moisture which drips down the side of the glass in the space between the latter and the pleats 14.

With regard to the doorknob cover 19, in order to apply the latter to a doorknob 20, the neck 23 thereof is stretched by finger pressure to enlarge the opening 24 sufliciently for projection of the knob 20 therethrough. When the neck 23 is released it engages the door side of the knob 20 and acts to secure the cover 19 to the knob 20. When the diameter of knob 20 is only slightly greater than the inside clear diameter of the annular wall 22, the longitudinally extending inwardly presenting ridges of the pleats 25 frictionally engage the rim surface of the knob 20 without any appreciable relative angular flexing movement of the component parts 26 and 27 of the pleats 25 and therefore without any appreciable expansive movement of the annular wall 22. When the diameter of the knob 20 is greater, the pleats 25 frictionally engage the rim surface of the knob 20 as aforementioned, but the outward pressure acting against the 3 pleats 25 is such as to cause relative angular flexing movement of the component parts 26 and 27 of the pleats 25 with a corresponding expansive movement of the annular wall 22 to accommodate the larged knob. When the diameter of the knob 29 is still greater, the afore mentioned expansive movement of the annular wall 22 is augmented by stretching of the wall to the extent necessary. Accordingly, the knob cover 19 accommodates knobs within a predetermined range of sizes. In addition, the cover 19 is quickly and easily placed over a knob, is removably secured thereto and is quickly and easily detached therefrom. Furthermore, when the color of a knob needs to be changed for decorative purposes, the change may be made by simply applying thereto a cover 19 having the desired color. Still further, the cover 19 provides a comfortable grip for the hand and prevents slippage, eliminates static-electric shocks caused by walking on rugs and, when formed with a base wall having sufiicient thickness or padding, or when internally fitted with a pad of suitable cushioning material, protects walls from damage due to the door knob striking the wall.

As indicated hereinbefore, the coaster and the doorknob cover 19 are shown and described for purposes of illustration only, it being apparent that the present invention may be embodied in products which have other uses, for example, as protective sleeves for various objects, as coasters for various sizes and. shapes of containers including flower pots, milk bottles and soda bottles. Accordingly, it will be understood that the present invention as herein shown and described is susceptible of various changes and modifications which may be made from time to time Without any departure from the general principles or real spirit of the present invention. For example, the pleats 14 of the coaster 10 might be at ranged to extend circumferentially about the wall 13 instead of-longitudinally thereof, thus providing not only for expansive movement of the wall 13 circumferentially, but also longitudinally. Accordingly, it is intended to claim the present invention broadly, as well as specifically as indicated in the appended claims.

What is claimed as new and useful is:

1. In an article of thecharac'ter described, a unitary body for incasing objects generally similar in shape and within a predetermined range of sizes, said body including a base wall, and an integral annular wall extending upwardly from said base axially of said body to a rim portion that defines an object receiving opening, said annular wall being provided with a plurality of uniformly spaced internal and external ridges alternately arranged thereabout so as to define an endless series of pronounced pleats extending axially of said body, said internal and external ridges in the region of said rim portion being unrestrained against relative displacement to a maximum degree radially of said annular wall to increase to a maximum the etfective internal diameter of the latter.

2. In an article as defined in claim 1 wherein the annular wall extends from a generally fiat base and is characterized by pleats that extend to the terminal edge which defines the object-receiving opening.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Kasman Oct. 9, 1951

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1668716 *Mar 23, 1926May 8, 1928Alexander S HerdmanDoorknob cover
US1683205 *Aug 11, 1927Sep 4, 1928Edward S PackardCup-drip attachment
US1771765 *Jan 24, 1925Jul 29, 1930Kalix Cup CompanyWaterproof paper receptacle
US2035384 *Nov 13, 1934Mar 24, 1936Coverknit IncTextile jacket for household utensils and other articles
US2115654 *Feb 4, 1937Apr 26, 1938Peter J SwoffordBottle and can container
US2570954 *Jan 31, 1950Oct 9, 1951Kasman John CCoaster
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2967002 *Jul 2, 1956Jan 3, 1961Lammers Delmar RProtective tray for cartons
US2990968 *Dec 7, 1959Jul 4, 1961Edward PirmanCoaster
US3126441 *Jun 30, 1960Mar 24, 1964 Housing for electrical capacitor
US3194468 *Jun 11, 1962Jul 13, 1965Somerville Ind LtdPlastic drinking cups
US3378680 *Mar 16, 1966Apr 16, 1968Elmer D. MoxleyCombined illuminated coaster and holder
US3473682 *Oct 2, 1967Oct 21, 1969Charles E StudenDrinking utensil jacket
US3578051 *Apr 1, 1969May 11, 1971Chemetron CorpCylinder cover
US3886987 *Apr 20, 1973Jun 3, 1975Schuchman Frederick EElastic surface exposure wrapper for soap cakes
US4340146 *Dec 10, 1979Jul 20, 1982Stratton John RDisposable coaster
US4709826 *Mar 9, 1987Dec 1, 1987Wong Mon NApparatus for the retention of fluid flowing from a container
US4722442 *Apr 6, 1987Feb 2, 1988Smith Elmer MDrip shield means for use with paint cans
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US5465461 *Sep 9, 1994Nov 14, 1995Devon Industries, Inc.For attachment to a handle receiving fitting on a medical surgery room light
US5469600 *Dec 13, 1993Nov 28, 1995Devon Industries, Inc.Disposable cover for contoured surgical light handle
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US6216902 *Oct 25, 1999Apr 17, 2001John HurfordFuel cap contoured cover
US6375227 *Nov 1, 1999Apr 23, 2002Patrick J. BrennerLateral displacement assist collar for hose coupler
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US6834414 *Feb 3, 2003Dec 28, 2004Shyue-Ding ChiuDoorknob cover capable of attracting or being attracted magnetically
US6886585Jun 25, 2004May 3, 2005The Patent Store LlcSoft grip drain
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US20110297639 *Jun 3, 2011Dec 8, 2011Rose Sorren-NornessCoaster
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WO1999055462A1 *Apr 27, 1999Nov 4, 1999Beckman Coulter IncHands-free gripping device for containers
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Classifications
U.S. Classification16/86.00A, 215/394, 150/155, 428/181, 292/DIG.200, 220/903, D07/624.1
International ClassificationA47G23/03
Cooperative ClassificationY10S220/903, Y10S292/02, A47G23/03
European ClassificationA47G23/03