Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2731713 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 24, 1956
Filing dateNov 23, 1951
Priority dateNov 23, 1951
Publication numberUS 2731713 A, US 2731713A, US-A-2731713, US2731713 A, US2731713A
InventorsVincent J Schaefer
Original AssigneeGen Electric
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of making a focused multicell
US 2731713 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 24, 1956 v. J. SCHAEFER METHOD OF MAKING A FOCUSED MULTICELL Filed Nov. 23

Ifiventor:

e g 6% a m Tr m s A L w H mm V 2,731,713 METHOD OF MAKING A FOCUSED MULTICELL Vincent. J; Sc'h'ae'fer, Schenectady, N. Y., assignor to General Electric Company, a corporation of New York Application November 23,1951, Serial No. 257,694 8 Claims. or. 29-423 This invention relates to the met'hod of making a focused multicell; More particularly, the invention relates to a method for preparing a multicell in which. all of the cell units are so oriented that they are focused at a point a predetermined distance from the unit.

A multicell is a the manner of the cells making up a honeycomb. 'The group of cells in a multicell may have their axes positioned in parallel alignment/but this is not necessary. in certain optical apparatus, it is very desirable to have a multicell in which the axes of all of the individual cells are focused on a sing-le point. In the past the preparation of a multicell made up of a great many very minute cells which have their axes focused on a single point has represented a very difiicult problem.

it is an object of this invention to provide a method forproducing a focusing multicell made of many very small individual cell units. Another object of the invention is to produce amulticell heating element having a great deal of radiating surface area.

Another object of the invention is to provide a method for fabricating a focusing multicell wherein there is very little likelihood that any of the cells will buckle during fabrication.

Other objects of the invention will be apparent from a perusal of the following specification considered in conjunction with the attached drawings wherein:

Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic view of the initial step followed in producing a multicell;

Fig. 2 illustrates the forming step performed on the multicell; I

Fig. 3 illustrates a s'intering operation followed in fixing the cells in position;

Fig 4 illustrates the step of filling the individual eel-ls with liquid;-

Fig. 5 illustrates a freezing uicl in the cells is solidified;

Fig. 6 illustrates the step followed in focusing the individual cell units of the multicell; and

Fig. 7 shows the finished multicell of cell units in position.

In accordance with my invention, a strip of corrugated process whereby the liqstrip on top of the corrugated strip,

convex. A sintering operation will then fix and bond the individual cells together so as to retain this concaveconvex conformations. If the individual cells of the group of cells oriented somewhat in with the plurality 2,731,713 Patented Jan. 24, 1956 multicell are thin-walled and fragile, they may be filled with liquid and the liquid frozen, thereby imparting to the walls of the individual cells a considerable resistance to buckling.

The ends of the roll may then be compressed to restore the initialfiat configuration. This pressing operation realigns and reorients the axes of the individual cells so that they are focused on. a central axial point.

Referring to the drawings, Fig. 1 shows apair of rolls cross section. Strips 10 and12 are then cowound on a roll 13 where the corrugations of the strip 10 form a plurality of cells which are separated by the strip 12.

The size of the individual cells making up the multicell size of the teeth of the gears 11.

very easily by stopping the winding process when the desired diameter has been reached;

I When the multicell 13 has attained the desired diameter the strips 10 and 12 are cut and the loosely assembled roll placed upon a form 14 as shown in Fig. 2. The form 14 has a convex surface, the degree of convexity dependingupon the focal length which it is desired to have in the final multicell.- As the degree of convexity decreases, the focal length of the final multicell increases.

might tend to buckle them.

After freezing, the ice filled multicell unit is placed on an arbor press between two fiat plates as shown in Fig. 6

product is illustrated in Fig. 7.

While the strips 10 and 12 will normally be of the same material, it is not the temperature of a 300 cu. ft. room 10 F. in twenty minutes.

A multicell may be made up of very long cells (the width of the gears used for making the corrugated foil may be of practically any dimension), and the size of the gear tooth may be of any fineness down to 100 pitch or smaller. Such a multicell may be used very satisfactorily as a collimator for use in conjunction with X-rays. My

method may be used to fabricate multicells of very soft metal, such as pure lead and cadmium, by folding a foil of this substance on either side of a thin foil of steel or aluminum. When passed through the corrugating rolls, the soft material becomes intimately formed in contact with the harder core, and as a result, it is easy to make 'a strong multicell having a softer metal effectively sup- 1. The method of preparing a multicell which com- 'prises winding a corrugated strip along with a flat strip to form a roll having a plurality of cells in parallel axial alignment, deforming said roll to give it a concave configuration on one side and a convex configuration on the other, heating said roll to fix said roll in the concaveconvex position, filling said cells with liquid, solidifying said liquid, and forcing said solidfied liquid-filled roll to a flat-end configuration whereby the axes of said cells are brought to a substantially common focus.

2. The method of preparing a multicell which comprises winding a corrugated strip of metal coincidentally with a ,fiat strip to form a roll having a plurality of cells in axial alignment with the axis of the roll, forming said roll to provide a concave surface at one end of the cells and a convex surface at the other, sintering said roll to fix said concave-convex configuration, filling said cells with liquid, solidifying said liquid, and deforming said roll while the liquid is melting to flatness at the ends of said cells whereby said cells are axially focused.

3. The method of preparing a multicell which comprises corrugating a strip of bendable material, winding the corrugated strip together with a smooth strip to form a roll of cellular construction, break the cross-sectional planar alignment of the cells,

sintering the roll to fix the changed planar alignment of the cells, filling the cells with liquid, solidifying the liquid, and applying stress to said solidified liquid-filled roll whereby said cells are restored to their original crosssectional planar alignment and said cells are axially focused.

4. The method of preparing a multicell which comprises cowinding a thin corrugated metal strip with a thin flat strip to form a roll containing a plurality of thinwalled cells in parallel axial alignment with the axis of said roll, displacing sa'd cells longitudinally whereby the deforming said roll to V side of said roll at one end of said cells has a concave configuration-"and the side of said roll at the other end of said cells has a convex configuration, heating said roll to fix said cells in the concave-convex configuration, filling said cells with water, freezing said water, and pressing said roll to flatness at the ends thereof while the frozen water is melting whereby the axes of said cells are focused upon a common point.

5. A method as claimed in claim 4 wherein the metal strips are of the order of 0.001 inch in thickness.

6. The method of making a focused multicell which comprises winding a corrugated strip along with a fiat strip to form a roll having a plurality of cells in parallel relatively slidable axial alignment, deforming said roll to give a concave configuration on one side and a convex configuration on the other, heating said roll to bond the cells togetherin the concave-convex position, and forcing said bonded roll to a flattened configuration whereby the axes of said cells are reoriented to a substantially common focus.

7. The method of changing the relative axial orientation of the individual cells of a corrugated thin-walled multicell, which method comprises filling the cells with liquid, freezing t e liquid to rigidity the multicell, and deforming the multicell by an axially applied force while the frozen liquid is melting.

8. The method of preparing an axially focused multicell from a fiat cellular metal structure of the type having a plurality of open cells in relatively slidable parallel axial alignment, which method comprises applying an axial force upon said structure to deform said structure to a convex surface at one end of the cells and a concave surface at the other end, heating said structure to bond said cells in said concave-convex configuration, filling the cells with water, solidifying the water, and applying an axial force upon said structure while the solidified water is melting to deform said structure back to its original fiat configuration whereby the individual cells of the structure are reoriented in axially focused alignment.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 745,759 Baehr Dec. 1, 1903 1,121,859 ,Messiter Dec. 22, 1914 1,275,785 Stratton Aug. 13, 1918 1,588,976 McBlain June 15, 1926 1,976,871 Wine Oct. 16, 1934 2,075,815 .Knox Apr. 6, 1937 2,163,590 De Ganahl June 27, 1939 2,167,215 Leary July 25, 1939 2,212,481 Sendzimir Aug. 20, 1940 2,366,141 Alderfer Dec. 26, 1944 2,393,548 'McCoy Jan. 22, 1946 2,487,257 Morgan Nov. 8, 1949 2,498,674 Graham et al. Feb. 28, 1950 FOREIGN PATENTS Great Britain Oct. 29, 1940

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US745759 *Aug 6, 1902Dec 1, 1903Nat Tube CoResisting device.
US1121859 *Nov 8, 1912Dec 22, 1914Electric Weighing CompanyComposite magnetizable material.
US1275785 *Nov 9, 1915Aug 13, 1918Electric Controller & Mfg CoResistance unit.
US1588976 *Apr 12, 1924Jun 15, 1926James McblainElectrical apparatus for generating ozone
US1976871 *Dec 23, 1931Oct 16, 1934Wine William EApparatus for making a volute spring
US2075815 *Sep 29, 1934Apr 6, 1937Harry A KnoxMethod of forming a volute spring
US2163590 *Sep 9, 1937Jun 27, 1939Fleetwings IncMethod and apparatus for welding corrugated sheets to flat sheets
US2167215 *Apr 24, 1937Jul 25, 1939American Mach & FoundrySponge rubber roller and method of making the same
US2212481 *Dec 8, 1937Aug 20, 1940American Rolling Mill CoMulticellular expanded material and process of manufacturing same
US2366141 *Jun 25, 1943Dec 26, 1944Edward D AndrewsMethod of making pressure containers
US2393548 *Sep 1, 1944Jan 22, 1946Bell Telephone Labor IncWinding machine
US2487257 *Nov 23, 1946Nov 8, 1949Warren Webster & CompanyMethod of expanding containers by freezing liquid therein
US2498674 *Jun 11, 1946Feb 28, 1950Graham Erwin WMethod of winding electrical resistance wire strain gauges
GB528385A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2841866 *Feb 10, 1954Jul 8, 1958Daystrom IncMethod of forming thin-walled tubing into a desired shape
US2855664 *Dec 21, 1955Oct 14, 1958Rohr Aircraft CorpMethod of machining honeycomb core
US2988809 *Oct 8, 1956Jun 20, 1961North American Aviation IncFabrication procedure for parts having low density core
US3032635 *Oct 3, 1960May 1, 1962Kraft August LHeater and utilization system for converting small quantities of fusible solids
US3064345 *Aug 27, 1959Nov 20, 1962Northrop CorpProcess for chucking porous materials
US3078560 *Nov 23, 1959Feb 26, 1963John F VosburgMethod of cutting rubber and the like
US3086625 *Mar 19, 1959Apr 23, 1963Triar IncCellular core and method of making same
US3123905 *Jan 18, 1960Mar 10, 1964 Method of making honeycomb core
US3133346 *Jun 2, 1961May 19, 1964Armto Steel CorpMethod for bonding metals
US3196533 *Jul 10, 1963Jul 27, 1965Martin Marietta CorpMethod for forming honeycomb materials
US3265865 *Oct 9, 1963Aug 9, 1966Armstrong Cork CoElectrical duct heater
US3392759 *Sep 16, 1965Jul 16, 1968Barr & Stroud LtdElectrically heated windows or the like
US3413708 *Sep 12, 1966Dec 3, 1968Hexcel Products IncProcess for machining expanded honeycomb
US3919559 *Jul 12, 1974Nov 11, 1975Minnesota Mining & MfgLouvered film for unidirectional light from a point source
US3921000 *May 7, 1973Nov 18, 1975Searle & CoGamma ray camera system with corrugated collimators
US3936340 *Feb 16, 1973Feb 3, 1976G. D. Searle & Co.Method for making corrugated collimators for radiation imaging devices
US3937969 *Nov 14, 1974Feb 10, 1976G. D. Searle & Co.Gamma ray camera system with corrugated collimators
US3988589 *Jul 28, 1975Oct 26, 1976Engineering Dynamics CorporationMethods of collimator fabrication
US4181839 *Aug 26, 1977Jan 1, 1980Cardiac Medical Sciences Corp.Multi-view collimator
US4185195 *Dec 30, 1977Jan 22, 1980Emi LimitedConstruction of collimators and/or detectors for penetrating radiation
US4272668 *Nov 13, 1979Jun 9, 1981Armstrong Cork CompanySmall round air stream heating unit
US4414428 *Jan 30, 1981Nov 8, 1983Teledyne Industries, Inc.Expanded metal containing wires and filaments
US4535589 *Jun 13, 1984Aug 20, 1985Nippon Soken, Inc.Exhaust gas cleaning device for internal combustion engine
US4562630 *Oct 8, 1981Jan 7, 1986Gunnar LarssonMethod for the manufacture of heat exchanger elements
WO1992002317A1 *Aug 7, 1991Feb 20, 1992SpirecMethod and device for splitting a stream of fluid
Classifications
U.S. Classification29/423, 338/286, 378/149, 338/207, 29/610.1, 392/407
International ClassificationB21D53/04, H05B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationH05B3/00, B21D53/04
European ClassificationH05B3/00, B21D53/04