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Publication numberUS2732005 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 24, 1956
Filing dateJan 23, 1952
Publication numberUS 2732005 A, US 2732005A, US-A-2732005, US2732005 A, US2732005A
InventorsWalter D. Corning
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
corning
US 2732005 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 24, 1956 w. D. coRNlNG 2,732,005

CHAIRS Filed Jan. 2s, 1952 2 sheets-sneer 1 all 111,1 lll.

rlllllllll/l/IIIA Wa/er Z7. ('orm'gg Jan. 24, 1956 W D coRNlNG' 2,732,005

y tsiiiii ATTORNEYS INVENTOR United States Patent O CHAIRS Walter D. Corning, Knoxville, Tenn,

Application Ilanuary 23, 1952, Serial No. 267,777

8 Claims. (Cl. 155-77) This invention relates to improvements in chairs, and more particularly to such straight-back chairs as are used in dining rooms, dinettes and as card game chairs.

It has long been recognized that straight back chairs are uncomfortable in which to sit for any appreciable length of time. Because these have been manufactured generally for ornamental effect, or of simplified construction, it has not been practical to modify the construction thereof to such extent as will make them more comfortable.

In my prior application for Resliently Mounted Chair Back, Serial No. 678,403, filed June 21, 1946, now Patent No. 2,587,822, granted March 4, 1952, I have set forth certain improvements in such chairs adapted to provide greater comfort in use, by incorporating in the back or leg portion of the chair a non-metallic resilient insert incorporated between aligned sections thereof, with means for holding the insert in place.

An object of this invention is to improve the construction of the chair in the manner of applying an insert thereto to provide a more practical manufacture thereof and to conform more readily to standard chair des1gns.

Another object of the invention is to improve the structure of the resilient insert so as to adapt this for use in conventional chairs without material modification thereof nor weakening of the chair structure and yet will provide greater comfort in use due to the resilient nature of the insert applied thereto.

These objects may be accomplished according to certain embodiments of the invention by the provision of resilient inserts in one or more of therback rails and legs of the chair, or any of these, according to the points of the structure where yielding action may be desired. Each insert comprises a sheet or strip of yieldable material interposed between opposed aligned sections of the chair and securely fastened in place as an integral part thereof. Additional fastening means extends lengthwise of each part in overlapping relation with the adjacent sections thereof for securing the parts together in yieldable fashion. Such securing means may comprise strips of elastic material, metal springs, or a combination thereof, securely anchored to the adjacent chair parts and extending transversely of the strip or sheet interposed between the parts of the chair at the joint.

Certain embodiments of the invention are illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a4 conventional form ofchair, Vshowing the invention applied thereto;

, v Fig. 2 is a rear elevation of one of the back rails jshovving the resilient joint therein;

Fig. 3 is a side elevation thereof at right angles to Fig. 5 is arear elevation of the back rail showing 1a modified form of resilient joint therein; n,

2,732,005 Patented Jan. 24, 1956 ice Fig. 6 is a longitudinal sectional view therethrough;

Fig. 7 is a cross-section therethrough on the line 7-7 in Fig. 5;

Fig. 8 is an elevation of one of the chair legs showing a resilient joint therein;

Fig. 9 is a longitudinal section therethrough; and

Fig. 10 is a cross-section therethrough on the line lll-10 in Fig. 8.

The invention is shown as applied to a straight-back chair, such as a dining chair, ofce chair, and the like, provided with a seat 1, front and back legs 2 and 3, respectively, and with upright back rails 4 which support the back structure designated generally at 5. In this embodiment, the back rails 4 are shown as aligned with the back legs 3, forming continuations thereof, although these may be separate if desired.

At desired points in the chair, I prefer to incorporate yieldable or resilient inserts to provide for yielding thereof in response to the shifting of the body in the chair for greater ease and comfort. These inserts may be applied to the back, shown in Figs. 1 to 7, or to the legs, shown in Figs. 8 to l0, or to both the back and the legs in a single chair, according to the desire of the manufacturer.

In the form of the invention shown in Figs. l to 4, each resilient insert is formed by a block or sheet of relatively soft rubber, shown at 6, which has sufcient yieldability to flow in response to relative movement of the respective chair parts connected therewith. This will allow the desired yielding action, but the amount of free flow will depend upon the character of the chair and the use to which the insert is applied, as in the back or in the leg of the chair, or other portions thereof.

The block or sheet 6 of soft cushioning material, such as soft rubber, is interposed between aligned sections of the chair, such as the adjacent ends of portions of the back rails 4. The block 6 may be secured adhesively to the end faces of the rail sections, although such securing is not essential in the embodiment illustrated because the parts will be retained securely by the additional portions of the yieldable insert as shown.

The adjacent sections of the back rail 4 have recesses 7 formed therein and extending lengthwise from the end faces S thereof that abut against the block 6. Strips 9 of resilient material are fitted into the recesses 7 overlapping the block 6 and the joint between the adjacent sections of the back rail 4. These strips 9 preferably are formed also of soft cushioning material, such as soft rubber.

Overlapping the strips 9 on the front and back faces of each rail 4, are metal leaf springs 10 which are 4anchored in place by pins 11 extending therethrough and through the back rail, as will be apparent from Fig. 4.

This form of joint may be applied quickly and easily to the back rails or other portions of the chair, with little modification of the chair structure and without detracting from the appearance thereof, since it is possible to give an ornamental configuration to the leaf springs l0 and to the position and character. of the pins lll that will add attractiveness tothe chair back. Thus the resilient insertk may be applied to conventional chairs with little increase in the cost of manufacture, and without detracting from the appearance thereof or weakening it since the structure provides a sturdy connection between the chair parts and will, in fact, provide greater strength and durability thereto. At the same time, this insert makes it possible to provide greater ease for the user of the chair due to the yielding of the hackV portion thereof, especially in a forward and backward direction according to the disposition of the parts of the cushion, as illustrated in Figs. l to 4.

The several parts comprising the joint may be adhesively secured in place or fastened in any desired manner, although it is preferred that pins or other fastenings such as indicated at 11 be used to retain the spring strips securely to the faces of the rail sections.

Another form of the invention is illustrated in Figs. 5 to 7, which is shown applied to each of the Vback rails 4, although it also may be used 'in any other desired part of the chair, such as the legs. In this form of the invention, the adjacent sections of the rail 4 are spaced apart and have interposed therebetween a block or sheet 14 of suitable cushioning material such as soft rubber, and preferably is glued or adhesively connected with the end faces 15 of these rail sections.

Each of the rail sections 4 has a hole 16 bored inward from the adjacent face 15. A pin 17 extends through the block or sheet 14 of cushioning material and into the holes 16 of the adjacent sections of chair rail, being anchored in place by pins or other fastenings 18 that extend transversely through said sections and through the pin 17.

The pin 17 is covered about its periphery with yieldable material 19, preferably soft rubber. The holes 16 are preferably somewhat larger in diameter than the periphery of the pin 17 and its cover 19 so as to permit freedom of flow for this covering material, when pressure is applied in a backward or forward direction.

This form of insert will provide the desired cushioning action and yet it will be substantially invisible since the edges of the block or sheet 14 of cushioning material can be covered effectively so as to be substantially invisible. It will provide the advantages of a cushion support without modifying the appearance of the chair to any appreciable extent.

Another modification is shown in Figs. 8 to 10, applied to one of the chair legs 2 or 3 between adjacent sections thereof, although it will be appreciated that these cushion supports are not restricted to any particular place in the chair, as any one of them may be used either in the back or in the legs, or both, as pointed out above.

In the form shown in Figs. 8 to l0, the block or sheet of cushioning material is shown at 21, secured by adhesive or otherwise between end faces 22 of adjacent sections of the chair leg 2. The block or sheet 21 is used substantially in the same manner and of like character as the block 14 described above.

Each of the adjacent leg sections 2 has a hole 23 bored therein inwardly from the end face 22 thereof. A pin 24 is inserted through the block 21 and loosely into the holes 23. rubber or of other suitable material, although it should, like the pin 17, have suiicient yieldability to allow for yielding of the chair portion, if used in the back, but transverse yielding is not as necessary in the legs. For that purpose the pin 24 may be constructed of steel or of hard rubber. The pin 24 is surrounded by a covering 25 of relatively soft rubber or other cushioning material, which should be suciently smaller in external diameter than the holes 23 for freedom of flow thereof when pressure is applied. Transverse pins 26 may be used to secure the pin 24 in place, the pins 26 passing through the end sections of the chair.

When the device is installed in the chair legs below the seat level, and with all rubber parts, no steel, there can be a slight lateral movement as well as a backward and forward movement to the entire chair thereabove. This would provide additional tendency to relaxation to anyone who might be lounging in one of the larger chairs, giving more comfort because the chair would more or less follow the movement of the person sitting in it, and become a part of his body.

It is recognized that where the resilient inserts are -used in the legs below the seat level, there is less 1ikeli This pin may be formed of relatively rigid tageous in providing a vertical cushioning action for these portions of the chair. Moreover, where the forms shown in Figs. 5 to 7, or 8 to l0, are used in the chair back, above the seat level, and transverse yielding action is desired therein, the pin 17 or 24 should be of resilient material such as spring steel, rubber or the like, which will yield transversely as a result of the application of pressure thereto.

The use of relatively soft rubber as the cushioning element will provide a material cushioning action for a long period of time, because it does not wear appreciably in service. On the other hand, metal springs alone, if used to provide the yielding action in the chair, do give way in service and result in the possibility of a squeak developing, which would be annoying and unsatisfactory, but where metal is used, it supplements the cushioning action of the rubber and the latter is depended upon for cushioning the chair parts.

While the invention has been illustrated in certain embodiments, it is recognized that variations and changes may be made therein without departing from the invention as set forth in the claims.

l claim:

l. ln a chair having a support member including normally aligned spaced sections having opposing end faces, an insert of non-metallic resilient material interposed between the opposing end faces of said sections, and members extending lengthwise of the sections overlapping the insert on opposite sides thereof and connecting the sections together.

2. ln a chair having a support member including normally aligned spaced sections having opposing end faces, an insert of non-metallic resilient material interposed between the opposing end faces of said sections, members extending lengthwise of the sections overlapping the insert on opposite sides thereof and connecting the sections together, said members comprising cushions of no11-metallic resilient material secured to the sections on opposite sides of the insert.

3. In a chair having a support member including normally aligned spaced sections having opposing end faces, an insert of non-metallic resilient material interposed between the opposing end faces of said sections, and members extending lengthwise of the sections overlapping the insert on opposite sides thereof and connecting the sections together, said members comprising leaf springs secured to the sections on opposite sides of the insert.

4. In a chair having a support member including normally aligned spaced sections having opposing end faces, an insert of non-metallic resilient material interposed between the opposing end faces of said sections, members extending lengthwise of the sections overlapping the insert on opposite sides thereof and connecting the sections together, said sections having recesses in the opposite faces thereof receiving the members therein, metallic springs overlapping said members and the sections and extending lengthwise of the latter, and pins extending transversely through the sections and members and connecting the opposite metallic springs together for anchoring the parts in place.

5. A chair comprising a seat, a support element rigid with said seat, a leg beneath said support element, an insert of non-metallic resilient material disposed between the lower face `of said support element and the upper face of said leg, said insert comprising a block of uniform thickness and extending substantially throughout the area of the opposing faces of said leg and support element, and means for securing said support element and said leg together on opposite sides of said block.

6. The chair of claim 5 in which said means for securing said support element and said leg together comprises a pair of leaf springs extending vertically along and being secured to said leg and said support element in overlapping relation with said insert on opposite sides thereof.

7. The chair of claim 5 in which said means for secur- References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 35,761 Judah July 1, 1862 6 Dillingham Jan. 11, 1881 Lowrie May 5, 1885 Kennedy Sept. 17, 1895 Robinsohn Apr. 15, 1902 Yates May 10, 1904 Robinson Jan. 14, 1919 Christman Oct. 9, 1928 Curtiss Nov. 28, 1933 Meisler Dec. 29, 1942 Corning Mar. 4, 1952

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US35761 *Jul 1, 1862 Improved spring-back chair
US236418 *Nov 23, 1880Jan 11, 1881Himself And Homan eBroom
US317157 *Sep 20, 1884May 5, 1885 lowrie
US546540 *Jan 2, 1895Sep 17, 1895 Ball-bat
US697888 *Jan 8, 1901Apr 15, 1902Hermann RobinsohnRefrigerator.
US759490 *Dec 8, 1902May 10, 1904Florence Mfg CompanyTooth-brush.
US1291150 *Jun 18, 1918Jan 14, 1919Charles Alfred RobinsonChair.
US1687057 *Nov 3, 1926Oct 9, 1928Inland Mfg CoSpring shackle
US1937055 *Mar 8, 1929Nov 28, 1933Curtiss Aerocar Company IncSeat
US2306638 *Nov 6, 1941Dec 29, 1942Meisler John CFishing rod
US2587822 *Jun 21, 1946Mar 4, 1952Walter D CorningResiliently mounted chair back
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2779390 *Feb 23, 1954Jan 29, 1957Nu Parq Products LtdStools or like articles
US3427070 *Oct 3, 1966Feb 11, 1969Wallach GeorgeSafety seat for vehicles
US4225259 *Feb 15, 1979Sep 30, 1980Mcdonnell Douglas CorporationPallet coupler
US4549764 *Sep 14, 1983Oct 29, 1985K. L. Spring & Stamping CorporationFlexible chair back
US4869552 *Sep 14, 1988Sep 26, 1989Shelby Williams Industries, Inc.Flexible backrest assembly for a chair
US4938532 *Jan 11, 1989Jul 3, 1990Burgess Gerald NSeating apparatus
US5158388 *Nov 15, 1991Oct 27, 1992J.M.Voith GmbhArrangement for the jointed connection of a moveable flow control element with a support element
US5826304 *Jul 23, 1997Oct 27, 1998Carlson; J. MartinComposite flexure unit
US5865456 *Aug 19, 1996Feb 2, 1999Gt Bicycles, Inc.Bicycle flex joint with non-torsional encasement
WO1991003192A1 *Sep 7, 1990Mar 21, 1991Shelby Williams Industries, Inc.Concealed flexible backrest frame assembly for a chair
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/301.1, 403/220
International ClassificationA47C7/44
Cooperative ClassificationA47C7/445
European ClassificationA47C7/44F