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Publication numberUS2732117 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 24, 1956
Filing dateJun 26, 1950
Publication numberUS 2732117 A, US 2732117A, US-A-2732117, US2732117 A, US2732117A
InventorsR. D. Hillis
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
hillis
US 2732117 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 24, 1956 R. D. HILLIS 2,732,117

CARBQNATED BEVERAGE PRE-MIXING SYSTEM Filed June 26, 1950 4 Sheets-Sheet l FIG. I

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I IJI 119 It! o /0 O 196 A 138 I J L I F 1 i d M m I INVENT OR Pmvoouw D Hmus BY @MM ATTORNEYS Jan. 24, 1956 R. D. HILLIS 2,732,117

CARBONATED BEVERAGE PRE-MIXING SYSTEM Filed June 26, 1950 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 N I N VENTOR Rnuonm D. Huus o 7 BY @Q/W ATTORNEYS Jan. 24, 1956 R. D. HILLIS CARBONATED BEVERAGE PRE-MIXING SYSTEM 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed June 26, 1950 1N VENTOR BquoowuD. Huus \QN @LR WzZz ATTORNEYS it d States Patent CARBONATED BEVERAGE PRE-MIXING SYSTEM Randolph D. Hillis, Columbus, Ohio, assignor to Nehi Corporation, Columbus, Ga., a corporation of Delaware Application June 26, 1950, Serial No. 170,395

23 Claims. (Cl. 226-111) N 'This invention relates to a carbonated beverage pre-mixing system. I

This invention has particular reference to the provision .of a system whereby carbonated beverages can be sold in such places as factories in paper cups, thereby eliminating the breaking of glass bottles which are usually sold in such places. The problem of broken glass is a very serious one in many factories. Factory workers purchasing soft drinks from carts or wagons passing through the factories are extremely careless in the handling of the glass bottles. In many instances, a worker, after consuming a bottled beverage, will simply throw the bottle aside, breaking it on the floor, with the result that workers have been injured by broken glass and glass particles have found their way into products made in the factories.

It is recognized that it would be highly advantageous if factory workers could be supplied with beverages dispensed in paper cups, thus completely eliminating the dangers and disadvantages occurring through the breaking of soft drink bottles. However, this presents serious problems from a number of diiferent standpoints. In the first place, it is extremely diflicult to pre-mix a beverage syrup and carbonated water in large containers suitable for the dispensing of the beverages, due to the fact that the carbonated water tends very rapidly to go ofi into foam. In the second place, the procedure involved in a workable system is extremely slow, and the time required for filling the large containers renders it impracticable to use them for the purpose stated. In the third place, it is difiicult to provide a suitable large container'in which the beverage can be pre-mixed and from which it can be readily dispensed, when desired.

An important object'of the invention is to provide a novel apparatus for mixing finished carbonated beverages in relatively large containers for the-direct dispensingof the beverage in containers such as paper cups. vMore specifically, an important object of the invention-is to provide a system. wherein tanks can be filled with .premixed carbonated beverages without foaming, and in relatively short periods of time, thus rendering it practicable to provide a substantial rate of production of the charged containers.

, A further object of the invention is to provide sucha system having novel means for maintaining the interior of each beverage container under substantial pressure during the charging of the continer with carbonated water, thus preventing the foaming of the carbonated mixture.

. A further objectis to provide novel automatic means for maintaining a predetermined differential pressure between the source of carbonated beverage and the interior of each beverage tank as it is being filled, whereby the pressure maintained in the container will prevent the foaming of the carbonated mixture While permitting the higher pressure in the source of carbonated water quickly to fill the container. Y 1

A further object is to provide such a system wherein the same conduit is employed for initially counter-pressuring the beverage tank with carbon dioxide gas and for 2,732,117 Patented Jan. 24, 1956 thereafter filling the tank with carbonated water to form with the previously introduced syrup a finished carbonated beverage ready for dispensing.

A further object is to provide in the system novel means whereby the introduction of carbonated water is cut oif when the tank is filled, and to provide means whereby the pressure in the tank can then be reduced to that of the atmosphere for the removal of the filling cap for the container and the replacing of such cap with a second one used during the dispensing of the beverage.

A furtherobject is to provide an automatically'operated system which functions first to counter-pressure the tank with carbon dioxide gas, to cut off the introduction of such gas and open a valve in a line leadingto a source of carbonated water, to fill the tank and formthe finished carbonated beverage, and automatically to cut off the introduction of the carbonated water as soon as the tank is filled. I

A further object is to provide in combination with such system an automatic: means which functions upon the cutting off of the introductionof the carbonated water to vent the interior of the tank to the atmosphere to reduce the pressure therein to atmospheric pressure for the changing of the caps for the purpose stated.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent during the course of the following tainer showing the filling head in position thereon,

Figure 4 is a side eleva'tion'of a, beverage container ready for the dispensing operation, a portion of the container being broken away, v

Figure 5 is ,an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken verticallythrough one of the keyed valves used in conjunction with the dispensing operation, the section being taken substantially on line 55 of Figure 4,

Figure 6 is an underside perspective view of the upper portion of such valve device,

Figure 7; is a detailed sectional view online 7--7 of Figure 5, v, Figure: .8 .is a side elevation .of a dispensing container showing -a modified form of means for maintaining abeverage inthe'container under pressure for the dispensing operation, 'and Figure 9 is' a diagrammatievie'w of the wiring system for the apparatus, parts of the latter being diagram matically represented "in association with the electrical control elements therefor.

Referring to Figures 3 and 4, the numeral 10 designates a beverage container or tank used in conjunction with the present invention, these tanks being of suitable capacity, preferably five gallons. Each tank is provided with a head portion 11 having an upwardly extending cylindrical neck 12 which is closed either by a filler cap 13 as in Figure 3 why any suitable type 'of plain cap 14 as in Figure 4 when the beverage is to be dispensed. I v

The filler cap'13 in Figure 3 is shown as having an inner cap portion 16 sealed with respect to the neck 12 as at 17. Any suitable means may be employed for locking the cap in position, and in the present instance, the neck 12 is shown'as being provided with lugs 18'engageable by struck in lips 19 formed on'the depending flange 20 of the cap 13. The particular structure of the cap and the means for securing it in position form per se no part of the present invention.

A filler tube 25 extends through the inner cap 16 preferably axially of the tank for the charging of the tank initially with gas and then with carbonated water in the manner described. below. The tube 25 is closed at its lower end as at 26 and is provided just above its lower end with escape ports 27 for the radially outward flow particularly of the carbonated water introduced into the tank. The tank 10, the parts of the cap 13 other than the seal 17, and the tube 25 all are formed of non-corrosive material and preferably stainless steel.

In the art of packaging carbonated beverages, the operation of releasing pressures from the container as the filling operation progresses is known as snifting." The present apparatus employs such snifting means. Referring to Figure 3, the cap element 16 has projecting therethrough and welded thereto a snifiting tube 30. This tube, through suitable fittings such as an elbow 31 and union 32 is connected to a flexible hose 33 leading to the control boxreferred to below; The tube 25 is connected by an elbow 35 to a pipe section 36, the end of which is connected to one end of a flexible hose 37 also leading to the control box.

A liquid operated switch is associated with the cap 13 for the purpose of automatically cutting off the admission of carbonated water when the tank is full. This switch is shown in the present instance substantially in the nature of a conventional spark plug having a metal shell 40 and an insulating body 41, the latter of which is connected to a depending electrode 42. The electrode 42 is in the form of an internally threaded sleeve receiving the threaded upper end of the electrode proper 43 having a head 44 at its lower end, preferably polygonal, to facilitate the turning of the electrode 43 to adjust it longitudinally of the sleeve 42 and thus adjust the height of the head 44. A jam nut 45 is threaded on the electrode 43 to fix the latter in adjusted positions.

For the purpose of protecting the electrode 43 and associated elements from contact with any splashing liquid in the tank 10, a plastic or similar sleeve 46 surrounds all portions of the electrode as shown in Figure 3, being frictionally held in position by the head 44'and nut 45. A cable 48 leads to they plug 41 and is electrically connected through the binding post 49 at the upper end of the plug to the-electrode. elements" in the same manner as in a spark plug. A second wire in the cable 48, as indicated, by the numeral 50, is grounded on some portion of the tank or some metallic connection thereto, such as the elbow35 as shown in Figure 3.

As further described in detail below, the tank 10 is initially counter-pressured by carbon dioxide gas flowing downwardly through tube 25, and the shifter tube 30 communicates with a control mechanism forjdisconnccting the sourcev of gas pressure when a given, pressure is reached in the tank 10. At such time. the. tube 25 is connected to a source of carbonated water for the filling of the tank 10 in which a measured quantity ofsyrup previously has been placed. When the level of the liquid, reaches a predetermined height, the liquid will ground the-tank on the electrode head 44, thus completing a circuit to be described. to cut off the admission of carbonated water to the. tank. Thereupon, the snifting operation becomes a purging operation to reduce pressurein the tank 10 to that of the atmosphere. Thereafter, the.cap'13 can, be removedand replaced with one of-the caps 1.4 as in Figure 4, whereupon the tankisready to-be transported to the location of the dispensing operation and prepared for such operation.

For use in suitably connecting the tank to. the necessary elements for the dispensing operation, the headportion 11 of each tank is providedwith a pair of spaced sleeves and 61. These sleeves are set verticallythrough the head 11 and are welded in position as shown, Que sleeve is associated with the means for introducing gas pressure for maintaininga dispensing pressure in the tank and the other sleeve isassociated with the means for dispensing the beverage through a suitablefaucet (not. shown). In

Figures 3 and 5, the sleeve 60 is shown and is associated with the beverage dispensing means, the sleeve 61 in Figure 4 being associated with the gas introducing means. Except as noted below, the means associated with the two sleeves 60 and 61 are identical and the parts which are common to the two need not both be illustrated and described. One of the valve mechanisms associated with the sleeves 60 and 61 is shown in detail in Figures 5, 6 and 7.

Referring to Figure 5, the numeral 64 designates a fitting threaded at its lower end in the upper end of the sleeve 60 and seating upon a sealing washer 65'. The upper end of the fitting 64 is externally threaded for reception in a cap 65 having a reduced externally threaded upper end 66 for a purpose to be described. Between the horizontal portion 67 of the cap 65 and the upper end of the fitting 64 is a plastic washer 68 which provides a sealing connection between the fitting 64 and cap 65 and which serves also as a valve seat. A valve 69 is arranged in the upper end of the fitting 64 and is of such polygonal form as to fit loosely in position to be relatively accurately guided in vertical movement while providing spaces for the flow of fluid therepast. The top of the valve is provided with an upstanding annular integral rib engageable against the plastic sealing member 68 to close communication therethrough. A convolutc spring 71 urges the valve 69 toward closed position.

The valve device in Figure 5 is employed for the dispensing of the beverage, and to this end, it is provided with a dip tube 75 which extends substantially to the bottom of the tank 10 as shown in Figure 4. The dip tube extends through aligned bores 76 and 77 formed in the sleeve 61 and at the lower end of the fitting 64, and an O ring 78 snugly engages the dip tube 75 to prevent leakage upwardly around this tube. The elements associated with the sleeve 61 are identical with the elements shown in Figures 5. 6 and 7 except that the dip tube 75 and O ring 78 are omitted.

The upper end 66 of the cap 67 is internally threaded in an upper locking cap 80, and this cap retains in position an 0 ring 81 recessed into the upper end of the member 66 for a purpose to be described. The member 66 and cap are provided with aligned bores 82 and 83 respectively for a purpose to be described.

The cap 80 is provided with a reduced neck 85 above which is formed an outstanding flange 86 which is circular except that it is flattened at one side as at 87 as shown in Figure 7. The groove or neck 85 in conjunction with the flange 86 and its flattened side 87 provide means for locking to the mechanism just described a valve device which provides for the outward flow of beverage or the inward flow of gas for main taining a pressure head in the tank.

The valve device referred to comprises a generally cylindrical body 90 in which is arranged a plug valve 91 preferably provided with a sealing sleeve 92 of flexible plastic or any other similar suitable material. The valve 91 is provided with an axial passage 93 which extends downwardly through a key tube 94 the lower end of which is slightly tapered to decrease in diameter to facilitate its insertion in position, and the lower extremity of the key tube is transversely slotted as at 95 tofo'rm fluid passages. The upper end of the valve 91 engages a resilient washer 98, and the upper extremity of' thesleeve 90 is provided with an external bead 99 similar to the formation of the bead at the upper end of a conventional beverage bottle and preferably of the same size. This head is adapted for connection with a crown cap 100, and the bead 99 is preferably the same size as the bead of an ordinary beverage bottle in order that a standard crow'n100'may be employed. The cap 100, being preferably conventional, has a cork liner which engages the resilient washer 98, thus resiliently holding the valve 91 in position without binding the latter against turning movement.

The valve 91 is provided with a transverge passage 101 communicating with the upper end of the passage 93. A hose connecting nipple 102 is carried by the sleeve 90 and communicates with the passage 101. The nipple 102 is adapted for connection with a suitable hose 103 (Figure 4) leading to the beverage dispensing faucet.

At one side thereof, the sleeve 90 is provided with a depending portion 105 undercut as at 106 to receive the flange 86. The depending portion 105 (Figures 6 and 7) has a flat face 107 spaced from the axis of the tube 94 a distance equal to the similar spacing of the flat face 87 of the flange 86. The valve 91 (Figures 6 and 7) is similarly provided with a depending portion 108 which, in the normal position of the parts as shown in Figure 7, has a flat face 109 aligning with the flat face 107, and these faces under such conditions will lie in a common plane with the face 87 of the flange 86. The bore of the sleeve 90in which the valve 91 is arranged extends downwardly past the projection or lip 108, whereuponthesleeve 90 extends under such projection or lip as at 110 (Figure 6) thereby forming the recess 106 as an arcuate groove (Figure 7) within the projection 105 for receiving the circular portion of the flange 86 when the sleeve 90 is turned to lock the parts together as shown in Figure 5.

As previously stated, the elements associated with the two sleeves 60 and 61 will be indentical except that in connection with the sleeve 60, the dip tube 75 and O ring 78 are omitted. The same locking arrangement of the parts is provided, and the key sleeve 94 in each case will unseat the valve 69 to afford communication between the interior of the tank and the hose 103 associated with the nipple 102. A similar hose 112 is connected to the valve mechanism of the sleeve 60 for the introduction of an inert gas into the tank to provide the necessary dispensing pressure head.

In Figure 8 of the drawings, there is shown a modified type of means for subjecting beverage in the container to a dispensing pressure. The apparatus previously described is employed in those localities wherean inert gas of a pure nature is accessible at relatively low cost. It ordinarily is not desired to use air for the necessary pressure in factories, since such air frequently is contaminated. If it is desired to use air, the device shown in Figure 8 may be employed. In this case, the sleeve 61 associated with the gas inlet is provided with a short nipple 115 (Figure 8) and a thin highly elastic bladder 116 is connected to this nipple and normally is of the shape shown in solid lines in Figure 8. The bladder 116 may be subjected to air pressure to expand it to displace beverage from the tank for the dispensing operation. It has been found that a bladder formed of the proper material, such as some of the readily available highly elastic plastics, will expand to fill the tank substantially completely so as to provide for the substantially complete evacuation of the beverage from the tank 10.

The control mechanism for the tank filling operations is shown in Figures 1 and 2. Such mechanismis housed within a suitable box 120 mounted against a wall and normally provided with a cover (not shown) closing the face of the box. A pipe 121 leads to a suitable source of carbonated water, such pipe extending through the side of the box as shown in Figure l and thence downwardly through the box to an outlet nipple 122 connected to the hose 37 (see Figure 3). In the'pipe 121 is arranged a valve housing 123 in which is arranged a poppet valve 124, this valve being normally biased to closed position and adapted to be opened upon energization'of a solenoid 125, the control means for which will be described later.

Within the box 120 and preferably adjacent the pipe 121 is arranged a smaller pipe 128 leading through aside wall of the box to a fitting 129 to which is connected a suitable pipe (not shown) leading to: a source of carbon dioxide gas. The lower end of the pipe128 is tapped into the pipe 121 as at 130. Above the point 130 is arranged a valve housing 131 having a poppet valve 132 therein nor mally biased to closed position and adapted to be opened upon energization of a solenoid 133, the circuit for which will be described later. It will be apparent that when the valve 132 is opened and the valve 124 is closed, carbon dioxide gas will be supplied to the hose 37 and thence to the tank 10. This gas is supplied in a manner fully described below to charge the tank 10 with an initial pressure to prevent the foaming of the carbonated water when the latter is admitted. When the proper pressure is reached in the tank, the valve 132 is closed and the valve 124 is opened to fill the tank 10 with carbonated water, and these operations are all fully described below.

The snifter hose 33 (Figure 3) is connected by a suitable fitting 135 to a pipe v136 within the box 120. This pipe is provided with a T 137, the branch 138 of which is connected to a valve housing 139 by a lateral extension 140 thereon having a passage 141- therethrough (Figure 2). The passage 141 leads to the interior of the valve housing 139 for communication with an annular passage 142 formed around a plug 143. The plug 143 has a passage 144 therethrough communicating with a lower passage 145 in the valve body 139, the purpose of this passage being described below.

At the upper end of the passage 144, there is formed a valve seat 146 engageable by a valve 147, and when this valve is opened in a manner to be described, the passage 144 communicates with the annular space 142 through radial ports 148.

The'plug 143 extends upwardly above the valve 147 for reception within an upper housing 150, the housings 139 and 150 being clamped together relative to each other as at 151 (Figure l). The housing 150 is provided with an axial bore 154 in which the upper end of the plug 143 extends, and within this bore is arranged a compression spring 155 having an upper spring seat 156 carried by the stem 157 of the valve 147.

The upper end of the valve stem 157 engages against a preferably metallic diaphragm 160 arranged and clamped between casing members 161 and 162, the lower casing member 161 being carried by the upper end of the housing 150. The upper casing section 162 is provided with an upper axial tubular extension 163 in which are arranged concentric compression springs 164 and 165, the two upper springs being employed for the purpose of lending stability to the operation of the diaphragm 160 under the variable pressures to which the diaphragm is subjected. The upper ends of the springs 164 and 165 seat against an adjusting screw 166 threaded in the upper end of the tube 163. This screw is adjustable to predetermine the differential pressure conditions on opposite sides of the diaphragm 160 to determine the pressure beneath the diaphragm at which the valve 147 will open. A cap nut 167 is threaded on the upper end of the tube 163.

The cap nut 167 and adjusting screw 166 are apertured for the passage therethrough of an axial stem 170 the lower end of which is fixed to the diaphragm 160. A cap 171 is threaded on the larger cap 167 and an O ring 172 is arranged therewithin to prevent leakage past the stem 170. The stem 170 operates a normally closed micro-switch 173 for a purpose to be described.

The underside of the diaphragm 160 is subject to pressures in the tank 10.through pipe 136 and passage 141, and through a bleed port 175 drilled through the plug 143 to communicate between the annular passage 142 and the bore 154. The top of the diaphragm 160 is subject to pressure in the source of carbon dioxidegas, and for this purpose, the interior of the tube 163 is connected to the gas pipe 128 by a pipe 176.

The housing 150 is provided with a lateral extension 177 having a passage 178 communicating with the bore 154 and with an angular passage 178' having anenlarged threaded outer end 179. A needle valve 180 carried by a nut 181 is adapted to close the passage 178. A pressure gauge maybe threaded in the opening 179; and the needle provided with a main control switch 207.

circuit, and for example in the wire 205, is arranged a 9 valve 180 opened to determine the pressure to which the bottom face of the diaphragm is subjected.

The passage 145 of the valve housing 139 is connected by a suitable fitting 185 to a valve housing 186 having therein a poppet valve 187, normally closed, and adapted to be opened upon energization of a solenoid 188 in a manner to be described. The other side of the valve housing 186 is connected to one end of a pipe 190 leading to a fitting 191 leading through the bottom of the box 120 and preferably directly open to the atmosphere.

The valves 147 and 187 control the pressure in the tank 10 during the filling operation, and excess pressure is snifted ofi through the pipe 190 as further described in detail below. The apparatus is provided with means operative after the tank 10 has been filled for purging off the pressure in the tank 10 so that upon reduction of such pressure to that of the atmosphere, the cap 13 (Fi ure 3) can be safely removed and replaced by the cap 14 ready for the dispensing operation. The means for purging the tank 10 is shown in Figures 1 and 2.

As indicated above, one end of the run of the T 137 is connected to the pipe 136. The other end of the run of the T is connected by a pipe 195 to a valve housing 196. This housing has therein a poppet valve 197 normally closed and adapted to be opened upon energization of a solenoid 193. The other end of the valve housing 196 is connected by a suitable fitting 199 to one end of a pipe 269 tapped into the pipe 1% which, as stated above, is open at its lower end to the atmosphere.

The electrical control system for the apparatus is shown in Figure 9. Two main wires 204 and 205 are connected across a source of current, the wire 265 being shown as being grounded at 266 and the wire 204 being In the main signal light 208 to give a visible indication that the switch 207 is closed and the system as a whole operative. The wire 264 is connected to a wire 2% which leads to one terminal of a. magnet 210. The other terminal of this magnet is connected to a wire 211 which is grounded as at 212 with a push button 213 interposed in the wire 211. Momentarily depressing the push button 213 obviously energizes the magnet 219 to attract the armature 214 to swing it in a clock-wise direction from the inoperative position shown in Figure 9.

The armature 214 acts as a latch for an armature 216 of a magnet 217. When the magnet 217 is energized with the magnet 210 deenergized, the armature 216 will swing to the operative position shown and will remain in such position until the magnet 210 is again energized.

The armature 216 is connected to the wire 294 as shown, and when the armature 216 is in the operative position shown, it engages a stationary contact 218 connected to one end of a wire 219 leading to one terminal of the solenoid 195 associated with the purge valve 197. The other terminal of the magnet 198 is grounded as at 220.

One terminal of the magnet 217 is connected by a wire 222 to a switch indicated by the numeral 223, this switch being constituted by the electrode head 44 (Figure 3) and the body of the liquid in the tank 19 when the latter rises to the level of the electrode head. This switch is grounded as at 224, this being the ground to which the wire leads as in Figure 3.

The other terminal of the magnet 217 is connected to a wire 226 from which a branch wire 227 leads to a stationary contact 228 engageable by the armature 21.6 when the latter is released by the latching armature 214. The wire 226 has a branch 23% leading to a magnet armature 231 further referred to below. For the purpose of illustration in the diagrammatic showing in Figure 9, the wire 226 is shown as being connected to a switch arm 232 normally engaging a stationary contact 233. The switch arm 232 is shown as being connected to and insulated from the stem of the valve 147 as at 234. Actually, from a structural standpoint, the stem carrying the 8 switch arm 232 in Figure 9 will be the vertically slidable pin 170 as shown in Figure 2, and the switch elements constituted by the arm 232 and contact 233 will be the microswitch 173.

The contact 233 is connected by a wire 236 to one terminal of a magnet 237, the other terminal of which is connected by a wire 238 to a ground 239. The gas valve operating solenoid 133 is connected in parallel across the wires 236 and 238 by wires 242 and 243 respectively. Also connected in parallel with the wires 236 and 243 is a signal light 244 which obviously will be illuminated whenever the circuit is closed by the micro-switch. Referring for the moment to Figure 1, it will be noted that the two signal lights 208 and 244 are carried by and project from one side of the box 120. The push button 213 is conveniently arranged adjacent the signal lights and the mechanism for the push button switch and the wires for the signal lights are housed within a small box 245 within the box 120. The several magnets 210, 217 and 237 and their associated armatures may be housed within a relay box 246 within the box 120.

The armature 231 is associated with the magnet 237 and normally engages a stationary contact 259 connected to one end of a wire 251. This wire is connected by branches 252 and 253 respectively to one terminal of each of the solenoids and 188. The second terminal of the solenoid 125 is connected by a wire 254 to a ground 255, and the second terminal of the solenoid 188 is connected by a wire 256 to the grounded wire 254.

Operation When a tank 10 is to be filled, a measured amount of syrup is placed in the tank, whereupon the tank is ready to be filled with the desired quantity of carbonated water to form the finished pre-mixed beverage. The cap 13 is secured in position on the top of the tank, and all of the electrical parts of the system will be in the conditions indicated in the Figure 9. it will be understood that the keyed valves used in dispensing, one of which is shown in Figure 6, will be disconnected from the apparatus and the two valves 69, one of which is shown in Figure 5, will be in the upper positions seated against the washers 68, thus sealing the tank from the atmosphere.

The tank charging operation is now ready to be initiated. Assuming that the main control switch 207 (Figure 9) is closed, the operator will momentarily press the button 213, thus energizing the magnet 210, current flowing through wires 204 and 209, through magnet 216 and to ground through wire 211 and push button 213. The armature 214 will be attracted, thus releasing the armature 216 for movement out of engagement with the contact 218 into engagement with contact 223. In this connection, it will be noted that the water level switch will be open since there is no liquid in the tank 1!) to ground the wire 222. It also will be noted that the closing of the switch 297 will have closed a circuit through wire 204, armature 216 and wire through solenoid 198 to ground 220 to open the purge valve 197. inasmuch as atmospheric pressure will have been present in the tank 10, the opening of the purge valve does not aftcct the operation and the circuit through the solenoid 198 will have been broken upon operation of the push button 213, the armature 216 moving away from the contact 218.

The engagement of armature 216 with contact 228 prepares the electrical control system to perform its intended functions. The current will flow to armature 216 in the manner described, thence through contact 228, wires 227 and 226 to the micro-switch represented by elements 232 and 233, and the circuit at this point will be closed by virtue of the fact that the upper diaphragm chamber will be connected to the source of carbon dioxide under substantial pressure, for example from twenty-five 'to one hundred pounds per square inch, through pipes 176 and 128. From the micro-switch, the solenoid 133, magnet 237 and signal light 234 will be energized through the various wires 236, 242, 243 and 238, the circuitfor. these elements being grounded as at 239. The energizing of the solenoid 133 opens the gas inlet valve 132 (see Figure 2) and accordingly, carbon dixoide gas from the source will flow through pipe 128 into pipe 121 below the closed water valve 124, and thence through hose 37 into the tank in which it is discharged laterally through ports 27 (Figure 3). It may be noted at this point that upon the initial engaging of the armature 216 with the contact 228, the solenoids 125 and 188 will be energized, but this is only a momentary energization since the closing of the circuit through magnet 237 will move the armature 231 to disengage it from the contact 250. The circuit through solenoids 125 and 188 will be broken at the contact 250 so long as the solenoid 237 remains energized, as described below.

The gas flowing into the tank 10 will charge the tank 1 to a predetermined pressure less than that of the source of the carbon dioxide gas, the pressure differential being determined by the functioning of the diaphragm-operated valve 147 (Figure 2).

The pressure in the source, communicated to the top of the diaphragm 160, will hold this diaphragm in its lower position with the valve 147 closed until the pressure in the tank 10 reaches the desired point. The underside of the diaphragm 160 will be subject to pressure in the tank 10 through bore 154, port 175, annular space 142, port 141, pipe 136 and hose 33. The adjusting screw 166 is turned downwardly to tension the springs 164 and 165 to determine what pressure beneath the diaphragm 160 will be required to open the valve 147. This pressure may be adjusted for by connecting a pressure gauge to the opening 179 (Figure 2), opening the needle valve 180 and adjusting the screw 166 so that the snifting operation will occur at the desired pressure within the tank 10.

As pressure is built up within the tank 10, the underside of the diaphragm 160 will be subject to progressively increasing pressures, and when the pressure beneath the diaphragm 160 reaches the point where the gas pressure and the tension of the spring 155 slightly overbalances the gas pressure above the diaphragm 160 and the tension of the springs 164 and 165, the diaphragm 160 .will be moved upwardly to crack the valve 147 and to open the micro-switch and thus break the circuit at. the contact 233 (Figure 9) and deenergize the solenoid 133, magnet 237 and signal light 244.

The deenergizing of the magnet 237 releases its armature 231 for movement into-engagement with the contact 250 to energize the solenoid 125 associated with the water inlet valve 124, and to energize the solenoid 188 associated with the gas outletvalve 187.. The. latter valve is in series with the diaphragm-operated valve 147. When the valve 147 is cracked and the valve 187 opened in the manner stated, gas from the top of the tank 10 will flow from tube 30 through hose 33 (Figure 3) and thence through pipe 136 into passage 141 from which it flows into the annular passage 142 and thence through.

ports 148, past valve 147, through passage 145 and through the valve housing 186 to be discharged to the atmosphere through pipe 190. The valve 147 will be cracked only to the extent necessary tov prevent the accumulation of gas pressure in the tank 10 above the predetermined pressure for which the diaphragm 160 has been adjusted. 1

The gas is thus permitted to escape under control as carbonated water fiows'into the tank 10. 'It.will be apparent from the foregoing description that when the pres-' sure accumulates in the tank 10 to the desired point, the solenoid 133 will be deenergized to close.:the gas inlet valve 132. The admission of gas-into the tank is cut 011 at the valve 132. Simultaneously, the magnet;

237 will be deenergized and the armature 231 not only closes the circuit through solenoid188 to permit thev snifting off of pressure past valve187, but will also energize solenoid to open the water valve 1 24 (see Figure 2). Accordingly, carbonated water from the source will now flow through pipe 121, hose 37 and tube 25 to fill the tank with carbonated water. This water flows laterally from the tube 25 through ports 27 and will be discharged laterally under pressure against the sides of the tank 10 to flow downwardly therealong. The arrangement of the tube 25 and ports 27 is preferred since it permits a relatively free rapid flow of water to fill the tank 10 in a minimum length of time without substantial foaming of the water. In this connection, it may be pointed out that particularly in the mixing of carbonated water with syrups containing caramel, any appreciable agitation of the syrups while the carbonated water is being brought into contact therewith will result in substantial foaming. With the filling device referred to, the carbonated water flows downwardly along the sides of the tank and floats on top of the syrup without substantially agitating it.

As the water flows into the tank 10, it obviously dis places gas from the tank, and this gas continues to shift oif past valves 147 and 187 in themanner previously described, and the diaphragm mechanism functions to maintain the same pressure head in the tank 10 as the incoming water displaces the gas. The maintenance of this pressure head prevents any appreciable foaming of the carbonated water, as is necessary in an apparatus of this character. The proper pressure differential between the source of carbonated water and the gas in the tank 10 is maintained at the proper point to permit free ingress of water while at the same time preventing the foaming of the carbonated water. This pressure ditterential is preferably from ten to twenty pounds. It may be pointed out that with a pressure differential of approximately twenty pounds, a tank 10 of ten gallons capacity can be filled in approximately twenty-eight seconds. This is desirable where a large number of tanks are to be filled in order that time may be saved. If time is not so essential, a pressure diiferential of ten pounds can be maintained, in which case it requires approximately one minute to fill the tank. 1

The flowing of the carbonated water into the tank will continue as will the shifting operation until the tank is filled to the point where the carbonated water contacts the electrode head 44 (Figure 3). The head 44 is preferably spaced from the top of the tank and is lower than the lower end of the tube 30 for a purpose to be described. The insulating plastic sleeve 46 preferably surrounds the electrode 43 and head 44 to prevent the splashing of liquid against the electrode before the level of the liquid reaches the desired point. When such point is reached, the electrode head 44 will be grounded through the carbonated water to the tank 10,;the water acting. as the switch 223 (Figure 9) to close a circuit through wire 204, armature 216, contact 223,. wires 227 and 226 and thence through magnet 217 .and on to ground 224. The armature 216 will then be attracted toward the magnet 217 and will be engaged by the latching armature 214 to latch the armature 216 in the position shown in Figure 9. The circuit for all of the main control elements, that is, all of the elements supplied with current through wire 226, except the magnet 216, will be broken at the contact 228. The gas outlet valve 187 and water valve 124, previously openedby their solenoids, will now close, and the tank 10 will be closed completely to the atmosphere except through the purge valve described below.

The closing of the circuit by the water level switch through magnet 217 will close a circuit through contact 218, wire 219, purge valve solenoid 198 and ground 220. The purge valve 197 (see Figure '2) will now open, and the pipe 136 leading from the tank 10 will now communicate with-the atmosphere through pipe 195, through valve casing 196 and pipes 200" and 190. Pressure thus will' he released from the tank 10 to that of the atmosphere.

- At the. time the water valve 124 is closed, there will be a quantity of carbonated water trapped between this valve and the tank 10. Upon the opening of the purge valve 197, this water will flow into the tank by gravity, thus raising the water level above the electrode head 44, the water level finally reaching a point slightly above the lower end of the tube 30. During the initial purging operation, only gas will flow from the pipe 190 and its discharge nipple 191. The water level in the tank 10 will continue to rise as stated until finally a little of the liquid will be purged from the system through the purge line. This liquid may be caught and disposed of in any manner and as soon as this purging stops, the filled tank is ready to be prepared for dispensing the beverage.

The pressure in the tank 10 having been reduced to that of the atmosphere by the purging operation, the operator will remove the filling cap 13 and replace it with the cap 14. Both valves 69 (Figure 5) being closed and the tank being sealed by the cap 14, the tank may be inverted several times to mix the syrup and carbonated water. The tank is then ready for the dispensing of the beverage, it being understood that the tank will be maintained with the contents chilled at a proper dispensing temperature before the beverage is dispensed.

Suitable vehicles will be provided for carrying one or more of the tanks around a factory floor for the vending of paper cups filled with the pro-mixed beverage. Two of the fittings shown in Figures 5, 6 and 7 are employed with each tank, one for dispensing the beverage and the other for introducing into the tank the desirable gas under pressure to maintain a dispensing pressure head. In this connection, it is pointed out that without the introduction of pressure gas, the gas escaping from the beverage in the tank will maintain sufficient pressure to dispense the beverage. However, the gas content of the beverage will progressively decrease and the beverage will become progressively flatter and less palatable to the consumer. It is thus desired to supply a gas to the tank to maintain a dispensing pressure without loss of gas from the beverage. To this end, a tank of inert gas may be carried on the vehicle and the gas may be supplied to the tank 10 through any suitable conventional pressure control valve.

As indicated, when desired, inert gas may be employed, for example, nitrogen, carbon dioxide gas and even air, if pure and uncontaminated. The use of air, however, is not particularly recommended, since it is difficult to secure air of sufiicient purity for the purpose. The source of gas pressure may be a tank, as stated, or the gas may be supplied to the tank through a suitable compressor.

Assuming that a suitable source of gas pressure is available, together with a suitable dispensing faucet and hose, the valve devices shown in the upper portion of Figure 5 are connected in position on the caps 80 and locked relative to the flanges 86. The. operation for each valve device is the same and only one needbe referred to' in detail. In the normal position of the parts as shown in Figures 6 and 7, the lateral passage 101 is turned ninety degrees from the outlet spout 102 and the flat faces 107 and 109 lie in a common plane. Each valve body 90 is arranged in position over its associated cap 80 with the tube 94 aligned with the bore 83, and with the flat face 87 of the flange 86 lying in the plane of the fiat faces 107 and 109. The valve body 90 is then pushed downwardly to insert the tube 94 to the vertical limits shown in Figure 5; The tapering of the lower end of the tube 94 facilitates its insertion, particularly through the O ring 81, and as the tube 94 approaches its lower position, it will unseat the valve 69 as shown in Figure 5.

It will be assumed that suitable hoses are connected to the tube nipples 102, one hose leading to the source of gas pressure and the other to a dispensing faucet which will be closed. Obviously, the hose of the dispensing faucet will be connected with respect to the sleeve 60 which carries the dip tube 75, this tube being omitted from the sleeve 61. throughwhich gas is introduced.

. Having inserted. the tube 94 to its lower limit of move merit, the valve casing 90 will. now be turned. ninety degrees to bring the passage 101 of each valve 91 into alignmentwith its associated hose nipple 102. When this turning operation is' performed, the fiat face 87, engaging the fiat face 109 of the projection 108, will hold the valve 90 stationary while the valve casing 90 is rotated. A circular portion of the flange 86 will then move into the recess 106, thus locking the valve casing 90 to the cap 30. When both valve devices have been inserted, the interior of the tank 10 will be connected to the source of gas for maintaining a pressure head in the tank, and the dip tube will be in communication with the hose leading to the dispensing faucet. The operator, as will be apparent, can then open the dispensing faucet to fill paper cups for customers.

The form of the invention shown in Figure 8 is particularly adapted for use Where it is desired to employ air under pressure for effecting displacement of the beverage from the tank 10. The bladder 116 will be made of a thin highly elastic material, of which there are several available in the field of plastics. The introduction of air into the bladder 116 will expand it progressively as the beverage is dispensed, and if a suitable material is used, this bladder, when inflated to its limit, will substantially completely fill every portion of the tank 10 thus permitting a complete emptying of the tank 10 through the dispensing of the beverage. By the use of the bladder 116, air may be employed for displacing the beverage, even if the air is contaminated, since the air is kept out of contact with the beverage. Only the outside of the bladder 116 need be sterile and the outer surface of the bladder can be readily washed and sterilized.

It will be apparent that more than one tank of premixed beverage can be carried on the vehicle where demands for the beverage are relatively heavy. As soon as the tank is emptied, the operator can cut off the supply of pressure gas to the tank, remove the two valve devices by turning each valve body through an arc of ninety degrees and then lifting it, whereupon the valve devices can be connected in the manner previously described to another beverage tank.

The present apparatus is highly practicable in operation for the fully automatic filling, if desired, of large beverage containers. for dispensing pro-mixed beverages, particularly, but not necessarily, in factories. In large factories, there is a substantial volume demand for carbonated beverages during working hours, and in a practicable system of this character, it is necessary that the tanks be rapidly filled in order to keep pace with the demand for beverages. The present system is very rapid in operation and large volumes of pro-mixed beverages may be made without foaming, and under complete control during all stages of filling the containers and dispensing the beverages therefrom.

The present system makes it highly practicable to satisfy the demands for carbonated beverages in factories through the sale of the beverages in paper cups. As previously stated, much trouble has been encountered in the sale of bottled beverages because of the breakage of bottles, which cannot be prevented because of accidents, careiessnessof workers, etc. The breakage of botties in factories has resulted in serious injuries to workers and even in the imbedding of. glass particles in finished manufacturedproducts, particularly in the rubber industry. This results in the shipping out of defective products, some of whichicause. injuries to consumers;

The apparatus 'is comparatively simple in construction considering its high. production rate in filling the beverage tanks, and the apparatus is manufactured of relatively simple. and. easily obtainable parts. It is necessary to use nothing in connection with the apparatus except beverage syrups, carbonated water and carbon dioxide gas under pressure, all of; which. arestandard products in beverage bottling plants. The present apparatus. is particularly adaptedfor use in. such. plants, although it will be obvious Mean? that it readily may be set up at a suitable point in a factory to fill beverage containers practically at the site of the sale of the beverage.

While the apparatus has been particularly described with respect to its use on vehicles to be moved through factories for the sale of the pre-mixed beverage, it will be apparent that its use is not so limited. For example, the filled tanks may be used as a source of beverage in an automatic vending machine, no water connections being necessary and it being possible to provide a completely self-contained vending unit merely by'providing in connection with the machine a filled tank 10 and a source of pressure for dispensing beverage from the container as the vending machine operates.

I claim:

1. In a system for filling a container with a carbonated beverage, a conduit communicating with the interior of the container, a gas pipe connecting said conduit to a source of gas pressure, a liquid pipe connecting said conduit to a source of carbonated liquid, a gas valve in said gas pipe, a liquid valve in said liquid pipe, said gas valve being adapted to be opened while said liquid valve is closed to charge the container with gas, means subject to operation solely by pressure in the container and operative when the pressure in the container reaches a predetermined point for closing said gas valve and opening said liquid valve, and means simultaneously operable by said last named means for providing controlled communication between the container and the atmosphere to maintain a predetermined pressure in the container while the latter is being filled with carbonated liquid.

2. In a system for filling a container with a carbonated beverage, a conduit communicating with the interior of the container, means for selectively connecting said conduit to a source of gas pressure and to a source of a carbonated liquid whereby the container may be first connected to said gas source to place the interior of the container under pressure and then to said liquid source to fill the container with the carbonated liquid, a pressure control mechanism communicating with the interior of the container, said control mechanism comprising a pressure controlled valve subject to operation by pressure in the containerand providing for the escape of gas from the-container to maintain a uniform predetermined pressure in the container during the filling thereof with the carbonated liquid, and means rendered operative when the liquid in the container reaches a predetermined level for rendering said pressure control valve ineffective for permitting the escape of gas from the container and for opening the container to the atmosphere for reducing the pressure in the container to atmospheric pressure.

3. In a system for filling a container with a carbonated beverage, va conduit communicating with the interior of the container, means for selectively connecting said conduit to a source of gas pressure and to a source of a carbonated liquid whereby the container may be first connected to said gas source to place the interior of the container under pressure and then to said liquid source to fill the container with the carbonated liquid, a pressure control mechanism communicatingwith the interior of the container, said control mechanism comprising a pressure controlled valve subject to operation by pressure in the"'container and providing forthe escape of gas from the container to maintain a uniform predetermined pres sure in the container during the filing thereof with the carbonated liquid, means rendered operative when the liquid in the container reaches a predetermined level for,

cutting oil the supply of carbonated liquid to the container and for connecting the container at such time to the atmosphere for reducing the pressure in the container to atmospheric pressure.

4. In a system for filling a container with a carbonated beverage, a conduit communicating with the interior of the container, a gas pipe connecting said conduit to a source of gas pressure, a liquid pipe connecting said said liquid valve, and means rendered operative when the liquid in the container reaches a predetermined level to effect closing of said liquid valve.

5. In a system for filling a container with a carbonated beverage, a conduit communicating with the interior of the container, a gas pipe connecting said conduit to a;

source of gas pressure, a liquid pipe connecting said conduit to a source of carbonated liquid, a gas valve in said gas pipe, a liquid valve in said liquid pipe,-said gas valve being adapted to be opened while said liquid valve is closed to charge the container with gas, means subject solely to pressure in the container and operative when the pressure in the container reaches a predetermined point for closing said gas valve and opening said liquid valve, means subject to pressure in the container and, operative after said predetermined pressure is reached for providing controlled communication between the container and the atmosphere to maintain a predetermined pressure in the container while the latter is being filled with carbonated liquid, and means operative when the liquid in thecontainer reaches a predetermined level for,

closing said liquid valve.

6. In a system for filling a container with a carbonated beverage, a conduit communicating with the interior of the container, a gas pipe connecting said conduit to a source of gas pressure, a liquid pipe connecting said conduit to a source of carbonated liquid, a gas valve in said gas pipe, a liquid valve in said liquid pipe, said gas valve being adapted to be opened while said liquid valve is closed to charge the container with gas, means subject solely to pressure in the container and operative when the pressure in the container reaches a predetermined point for closing said gas valve and opening said liquid valve, means subject to pressure in the container and operative after said predetermined pressure is reached for providing controlled communication between the container and the atmosphere to maintain a predetermined pressure in the container while the latter is being filled with carbonated liquid, means operative when the liquidin the container Y precharge it, a liquid pipe communicating with said. con-v duit to supply to the container-aicarbonated liquid from a source at a predetermined pressure, a valve in said. gas pipe adapted to be opened to connect the container to the source of pressure, a valve in said liquid pipe, manual means for opening said gas pipe valve, automatically operated means subject to operation by pressure in the container andoperable after the container has been precharged with gas pressure for closing the valve in said gas pipe and opening the valve in said liquid pipe, and automatically operated valve means controlling'communication between the container and the atmosphere to control pressure in the containerto maintain such pres-- sure at a point lower than the predetermined pressure of the source of carbonated liquid.

8. In a system for filling a container with a carbonatedbeverage, a cap forthe container, a conduit extendingthrough said cap, a gas pipe-communicating with said con;

duit to supply gas under pressure to the container to pre1 source at a predetermined pressure, a valve in said gas pipe adapted who opened to connect the container to the source of pressure, a valve in said liquid pipe, manual means for opening said gas pipe valve, automatic means subject to operation by pressure in the container and operable after the container has been precharged with gas pressure for opening the valve in said liquid pipe, automatic valve means controlling communication between the container and the atmosphere to control pressure in the container to maintain such pressure at a point lower than the predetermined pressure of the source of carbonated liquid, and means operable when the liquid reaches a predetermined level in said container for venting the container to the atmosphere to reduce the pressure in the container to atmospheric pressure.

9. In a system for filling a container with a carbonated beverage, a cap for the container, a conduit extending through said cap, a gas pipe communicating with said conduit to supply gas under pressure to the container to prechargc it, a liquid pipe communicating with said conduit to supply to the container a carbonated liquid from a. source at a predetermined pressure, avalve in said gas pipe adapted to be opened to connect the container to the source of pressure, a valve in said liquid pipe adapted to be opened after said gas valve has been closed upon the completion of the precharging of the container, a pipe line communicating at one end with the container through said cap, an automatic valve in said pipe line conrtolling communication between the container and the atmosphere, said automatic valve being set to release gas from the container whenthe pressure therein is above a predetermined point lower than said first-mentioned predetermined pressure, and means rendered operative when the liquid in the container reaches a predetermined level for connecting the container to the atmosphere independently of said automatic valve to reduce the pressure in the container to atmospheric pressure.

10. In a system for filling a container with a carbonated beverage, a conduit communicating with the interior of the container, means for selectively connecting said conduit to a source of gas pressure and to a source of a carbonated liquid whereby the container may be first connected to said gas source to place the interior of the container under pressure and then to said liquid source to fill the container with the carbonated liquid, a pressure control mechanism communicating with the interior of the container, said control mechanism comprising a pressure controlled valve providing for the escape of gas from the container to maintain a uniform predetermined pressure in the container during the filling thereof with the carbonated liquid, a valve controlling communication between the container and the atmosphere, a solenoid connected to such valve and energizable to open it, and means operative when the liquid in the container reaches a predetermined position for energizing said solenoid.

11. Apparatus constructed in accordance with claim wherein the means for energizing said solenoid comprises a circuit for said solenoid including a liquid-operated switch carried by said cap and projecting downwardly into the container.

12. In a system for filling a container with a carbonated beverage, a conduit communicating with the interior of the container, a gaspipe connecting said conduit to a source of gas pressure, a liquid pipe connecting said conduit to a source of carbonated liquid, a gas valve in said gas pipe, a liquid valve in said liquid pipe, said gas valve being adapted to be opened while said liquid valve is closed to charge the container with gas, means operative when the pressure in the container reaches a predetermined point for closing said gas valve and opening said liquid valve, automatic means operative after said predetermined pressure is reached for providing controlled communication between the container and the atmosphere to maintain a predetermined pressure in the container while the latter is'being filled with carbonated liquid, a normally closed valve controlling communication between the container and the atmosphere, a solenoid energizable for opening such valve, and means operative when the liquid reaches a predetermined level in the container for energizing said solenoid.

13. Apparatus constructed in accordance with claim l2 wherein the means for energizing said solenoid comprises a circuit for said solenoid having one side grounded on the container, and an electrode projecting downwardly into the container and insulated therefrom, the contacting of the liquid in said container with said electrode grounding the latter to the container to close the circuit through said solenoid.

14. In a system for filling a sealed container with a carbonated beverage, a water pipe communicating with the interior of said container and adapted for connection with a source of carbonated water, a water valve normally closing communication through said water pipe, a solenoid for opening said water valve, a gas pipe communicating with the interior of said container and adapted for connection with a source of gas pressure, a normally closed gas valve in said gas pipe, a solenoid energizable for opening said gas valve, means subject to manual control for energizing said gas valve solenoid to open said gas valve and charge the container with gas under pressure, and pressure operated means subject to operation by pressure in the container and operable when the pressure in the container reaches a predetermined point for deenergizing the gas valve solenoid and energizing the water valve solenoid to supply water to the container.

15. In a system for filling a sealed container with a carbonated beverage, a water pipe communicating with the interior of said container and adapted for connection with a source of carbonated water, a water valve normally closing communication through said water pipe, a solenoid for opening said water valve, a gas pipe com municating with the interior of said container and adapted for connection with a source of gas pressure, a normally closed gas valve in said gas pipe, a solenoid energizable for opening said gas valve, means subject to manual control for energizing said gas valve solenoid to open said gas valve and charge the container with gas under pressure, pressure operated means operable when the pressure in the container reaches a predetermined point for deenergizing the gas valve solenoid and energizing the water valve solenoid to supply water to the container, and a valve subject to control by said pressure operated means for snifting oil gas from the container while water is flowing therethrough to maintain the gas pressure in the container at a predetermined point.

16. In a system for filling a sealed container with a carbonated beverage, a water pipe communicating with the interior of said container and adapted for connection with a source of carbonated water, a water valve normally closing communication through said water pipe, a solenoid for opening said water valve, a gas pipe communicating with the interior of said container and adapted for connection with a source of gas pressure, a normally closed gas valve in said gas pipe, a solenoid energizable for opening said gas valve, means subject to manual control for energizing said gas valve solenoid to open said gas valve and charge the container with gas under pressure, pressure operated means operable when the pres sure in the container reaches a predetermined point for deenergizing the gas valve solenoid and energizing the water valve solenoid to supply water to the container, said pressure operated means comprising a pressure diaphragm having opposite faces subject respectively to pressure of gas in the source and pressure of gas in the container, and a snifter valve connected to said diaphragm and adapted to be opened by the latter under predetermined pressure in the container to maintain such pressure approximately at a predetermined maximum point.

17. In a system for filling a sealed container with a carbonated beverage, a water pipe communicating with the interior of said container and adapted for connection with a source of carbonated water, a water valve normally closing communication through said water pipe, a solenoid for opening said water valve, a gas pipe communicating with the interior of said container and adapted for connection with a source of gas pressure, a normally closed gas valve in said gas pipe, a solenoid energizable for opening said gas valve, means subject to manual control for energizing said gas valve solenoid to open said gas valve and charge the container with gas under pressure, pressure operated means operable when the pressure in the container reaches a predetermined point for deenergizing the gas valve solenoid and energizing the water valve solenoid to supply water to the container, a valve subject to control by said pressure operated means for snifting on gas from the container while water is flowing therethrough to maintain the gas pressure in the container at a predetermined point, and means operative when the water level in the container reaches a predetermined point for deenergizing the water valve solenoid to cut off the supply of water to the container.

18. Apparatus constructed in accordance with claim 17 provided with means for opening the container to the atmosphere substantially simultaneously with the deenergization of the water valve solenoid.

19. Apparatus constructed in accordance with claim 17 wherein the water valve solenoid is provided with a circuit including a switch, electromagnetic means energizable when the liquid level in the container reaches a predetermined point for moving said switch from a normal position closing said circuit to a second position opening said circuit, a normally closed purge valve controlling communication between the container and the atmosphere, a solenoid energizable for opening said purge valve, and a circuit for said last-named solenoid including said switch and such circuit being closed when said switch is in said second position, to open said purge valve and vent the container to the atmosphere.

20. In a system for filling a sealed container with a carbonated beverage, a water pipe communicating at one end with the container and having its other end adapted for connection to a source of carbonated water under pressure, a normally closed water valve in said water pipe, a solenoid energizable for opening said water valve, a gas inlet pipe communicating at one end with the interior of the container and having its other end adapted for connection with a source of gas under pressure, a normally closed gas inlet valve in said gas inlet pipe, a solenoid energizable for opening said gas inlet valve, a gas outlet pipe having one end communicating with the interior of the container and its other end communicating with the atmosphere, a normally closed gas outlet valve and a normally closed snifter valve both in said gas outlet pipe, a solenoid energizable for opening said gas outlet valve, a circuit for the solenoid of said gas inlet valve including a switch having mechanical connection with said snifter valve and closed when such valve is closed, means subject to manual control for energizing said circuit to open said gas inlet valve, means responsive to pressure in said container for opening said snifter valve and opening said switch when pressure in the container reaches a predetermined point to open the circuit through the solenoid of said gas inlet valve, parallel circuits for the solenoids of said water valve and said gas outlet valve, and means operative upon the opening of said switch for closing said parallel circuits to open said water valve and admit water to the container and to open said gas outlet valve to render said shifter valve operative for releasing pressure from the container as Water flows thereinto.

21. Apparatus constructed in accordance with claim 20 provided with means operable when the water level in the container reaches a predetermined point for opening said parallel circuits to deenergize the water valve and gas outlet valve solenoids to close said water pipe and said gas outlet pipe.

22. Apparatus constructed in accordance with claim 20 provided with means operable when the water level in the container reaches a predetermined point for opening said parallel circuits to deenergize the water valve and gas outlet valve solenoids to close said water pipe and said gas outlet pipe, and means operative substantially simultaneously with the opening of said parallel circuits for venting the container to the atmosphere.

23. In a system for filling a container with a carbonated beverage, a conduit communicating with the interior of the container, a gas supply pipe connecting said conduit to a source of gas pressure, a liquid supply pipe connecting said conduit to a source of carbonated liquid, a gas supply valve in said gas supply pipe, a liquid supply valve in said liquid supply pipe, a gas outlet valve adapted to control communication between the interior of said container and the atmosphere, means for opening said gas supply valve while said liquid supply valve is closed to charge the container with gas, and means subject to operation solely by pressure in the container and operative when the pressure in the container reaches a predetermined point for closing said gas supply valve, and opening said liquid supply and gas outlet valves.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 228,639 Hupfel June 8, 1880 484,078 Wittemann Oct. 11, 1892 680,011 Allwardt Aug. 6, 1901 948,463 Strasburger Feb. 8, 1910 988,657 Pfafi et al. Apr. 4, 1911 988,658 Pfatf et a1 Apr. 4, 1911 1,001,805 Bergsvik Aug. 29, 1911 1,979,605 Charmat Nov. 6, 1934 2,105,160 Piqurez Jan. 11, 1938 2,165,684 Struck July 11, 1939 2,167,123 Meyer July 25, 1939 FOREIGN PATENTS 114,825 Australia Mar. 19, 1942

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3068910 *Jun 16, 1959Dec 18, 1962Coca Cola CoCounterpressure filling system
US3167098 *Aug 28, 1961Jan 26, 1965Mojonnier Bros CoDouble filling manifold arrangement
US3248098 *Nov 15, 1962Apr 26, 1966Cornelius CoMeans of carbonating water
US4222972 *Jan 29, 1979Sep 16, 1980Caldwell Michael CMethod and means for carbonating liquids in situ
US4298551 *Aug 2, 1979Nov 3, 1981Thorn Svenska A.B.Appliance for making an aerated beverage
US4343824 *Sep 12, 1980Aug 10, 1982Caldwell Michael CMethod for carbonating liquids in situ
US7975989 *Oct 5, 2009Jul 12, 2011Lancer Partnership, LtdMultiple brand ice beverage dispenser
Classifications
U.S. Classification141/39, 137/392, 251/149.6, 141/197, 251/129.4, 141/48, 141/58, 222/482
International ClassificationB67D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB67D1/0016
European ClassificationB67D1/00F2