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Publication numberUS2732243 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 24, 1956
Filing dateMar 13, 1952
Publication numberUS 2732243 A, US 2732243A, US-A-2732243, US2732243 A, US2732243A
InventorsG. W. Mount
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
mount
US 2732243 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 24, 1956 s. w. MOUNT HAND MAGNETIC PICK UP TOOL Filed March 13, 1952 INVENTOR) 'eorye 1% Mimi/f.

ATTORNEYS United States Patent HAND MAGNETIC PICK UP TOOL George W. Mount, Greenfield, Mass.

Application March 13, 1952, Serial No. 276,394

3 Claims. (Cl. 294-655) This invention relates to a hand magnetic pick up tool.

The principal object of the invention is to provide a device which may be manufactured at relatively low cost and which will meet the needs of upholsterers for a means of removing a quantity of tacks from a keg or other large containers and deposit them in the 'smaller containers which serve the individual workmen at the point of use.

A further object is to provide a structure which makes the most efiicient use of so-called permanent magnet material.

Other and further objects residing in the details of construction will be made apparent in the following specification and claims and the disclosure of the drawing.

In the drawing,

Fig. 1 is a side view of a tool embodying the invention, parts being broken away and parts being shown in section;

Fig. 2 is a similar view showing a modified structure; and

Fig. 3 is a similar view showing a further modification.

Referring to the drawing, 1 designates a tubular sheath formed of non-magnetic material such as copper, brass, bronze or plastic. A length of conventional copper or brass tubing having a wall thickness of the order of of an inch or less is satisfactory for the purpose and has the advantage of commercial availability in thin cross sections.

Positioned within the thin sheath 1 is a permanent magnet designated at 2. By permanent magnet is meant a magnet formed from one of the alloys which provide magnets of extremely high attractive force and which retain a high attractive force indefinitely, such as the Alnico alloys. The magnet 2 preferably makes a snug sliding fit within the sheath 1, and one end of the magnet is substantially flush with the adjacent end of the sheath 1. The remaining length of the sheath is filled with a non-magnetic material preferably in the form of a solid or monolithic piece 3, such as a length of plastic rod or a piece of wood, molded fibre or the like. A piece of wood making a snug sliding fit within the sheath forms an economical and satisfactory filler member for the purpose. One end of piece 3 engages the adjacent end of the magnet member 2, the other end of the piece 3 being substantially flush with the adjacent end of the sheath.

The forward end of the sheath at which the magnet is positioned is closed by a steel cap 4 which is soldered, brazed or otherwise secured to the end portion of the sheath. The other or rear end of the tube is closed by a cap 5 similar to cap 4. Cap 4 is preferably secured in place before the magnet 2 and filler 3 are placed in the tube so that there is no danger of the magnet being deleteriously affected by the heat of soldering or brazing the cap to the sheath. With cap 4 in place the magnet 2 and filler 3 may be inserted successively into the sheath from the still open rear end of the sheath.

Before cap 5 is placed on the rear end of the tube, an annular member 6 formed of molded plastic or other non-magnetic material may be slipped onto the sheath, the member 6 being slidable on the sheath but with sufficient friction to be normally retained frictionally in any desired position on the sheath. The cap 5 having been secured in place, a bore 7 is drilled through the sheath 1 and filler 3 adjacent the rear end of the tool and the end portions of a bail 8 are inserted in opposite ends of the bore to provide means by which the tool may be supported in a convenient location for use. The bail 8 is not essential to the use of the tool. However, its ends extending into the bore 7 provide means to hold the filler 3 and magnet 2 in fixed end to end relation with the forward end of the magnet in contact with cap 4, so that when the bail is present, cap 5, which in the absence of the bail serves to hold the assembly together, may be omitted.

The ring 6 is a convenience in removing a load of tacks picked up at the magnetic end of the tool. As will be apparent movement of ring 6 from the full line position of Fig. l to the dotted line position of that figure will force the bulk of the tacks along the sides of the sheath and off the forward end of the tool.

The dimensions of the tool are not critical except that the diameter of the sheath and contents should be sufliciently large to provide a comfortable grasp of the tool by the hand and provide a magnet of adequate strength. A structure on substantially the scale of Fig. 1 is satisfactory for the purpose.

In the modified form of structure shown in Fig. 2 the bar magnet of the form shown in Fig. l is replaced by an annular magnet 10 of greater diameter but of shorter length, the increased diameter may be such that with the form of the magnet the tool has a magnetic field of approximately the same strength as that of Fig. l but with the field more concentrated at the forward end of the tool. In the form of Fig. 2, the tubular sheath 11, preferably in the form of a length of copper or brass tubing, extends only part way along the length of the filler member 12, the length of the sheath 11 being, however, at least sufi'icient to cover the sides of the magnet and that portion of the filler member which is with in the field of the magnet so that the surface to which the tacks adhere consists of the smooth relatively hard surface of the sheath. Particularly where wood or similar material is used for the filler member the points of the tacks may become slightly imbedded in the surface interfering with the removal of the tacks by the hand or a ring such as 6 in Fig. 1. The portion of the filler member 12 which is surrounded by the sheath 11 is redueed in diameter, as at 13, by an amount equal to the thickness of the sheath wall so that the surface of the sheath and the surface of the filler member rearwardly thereof are continuous one with the other.

The magnet 10, the sheath 11 and the filler member are held in fixed relation to each other by a cap member 14 which fits snugly over the end of the sheath and is held by a screw 15 extending through the center opening 16 of the annular magnet and engaging in the end of the filler member 12. The end of member 12, remote from the magnet, is preferably provided with a transverse bore 17 which receives the ends of a bail 18 similar to bail 8 previously described.

A further modification is shown in Fig. 3 where a magnet 20 similar to magnet 10 is positioned within the end of a non-magnetic sheath 21 similar to sheath 1] which is telescoped over a reduced portion of a wood filler piece 22. As shown, the filler piece 22, rearward- 1y of the sheath is reduced as at 23 to provide a handle portion of approximately the diameter of the tool of Fig. 1. A cap, such as shown at 14 in Fig. 2, is omitted and the magnet 20 is held to the end of the filler 22 by a screw 24 which extends through an opening 25 on the magnet. The sheath 21 is independently held in place on the filler by screws 26 or other suitable means. The free end of handle portion 23 is provided with a transverse bore 27 which receives the ends of the bail 28.

The invention provides a simple, sturdy pick up tool which can be cheaply manufactured, which meets the needs of upholsterers and can be used for removing stray tacks and other small metal pieces from work benches, the floor and other surfaces.

What is claimed is:

1. A magnetic lifting hand tool which comprises a hollow cylinder formed of non-magnetic metal, a cylindrical permanent magnet having an outer diameter substantially equal to the inner diameter of said hollow cylinder fitted snugly in one end of the hollow cylinder with one end of the magnet positioned flush with the adjacent end of the hollow cylinder, a cylindrical wooden filler piece having an outside diameter substantially equal to the inside diameter of the hollow tube fitted snugly within the hollow cylinder with its end tightly engaging the inner end of the magnet, a steel cap engaging the outer end of the magnet and secured to and closing the adjacent end of the hollow cylinder, and means to secure said wooden filler piece in the hollow cylinder and in said tight engagement with the inner end of the magnet, said wooden filler piece filling the major portion of the hollow cylinder to limit the magnetic field produced by the magnet to the end portion of the hollow cylinder in which the magnet is located.

2. A magnetic lifting hand tool which comprises a hollow cylinder formed of non-magnetic metal, a permanent magnet in the form of a solid cylinder having a diameter substantially equal to the inner diameter of said hollow cylinder fitted snugly in one end of the hollow cylinder with one end of the magnet positioned flush with the adjacent end of the hollow cylinder, a cylindrical wooden filler piece having a diameter substantially equal to the inner diameter of said hollow cylinder fitted snugly within the hollow cylinder with its inner end tightly engaging the inner end of the magnet and its outer end flush with the adjacent end of the hollow cylinder, and respective caps secured to and closing the ends of the cylinder, said caps respectively engaging the outer ends of said magnet and wooden cylinder and holding the magnet and wooden cylinder rigidly in place, the cap engaging the outer end of the magnet being formed of steel, the wooden cylinder filling the major portion of the hollow cylinder to limit the magnetic field produced by the magnet to the end portion of the hollow cylinder in which the magnet is located.

3. A tool as recited in claim 2, having an annular member of plastic slidably engaged on the hollow cylinder, the inner diameter of the annular member being less than the outer diameter of the caps to retain said member permanently on the hollow cylinder.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,228,690 Crary Jan. 14, 1941 2,390,339 Ullman et al Dec. 4, 1945 2,405,655 Kehoe Aug. 13, 1 946 FOREIGN PATENTS 122,983 Australia Dec. 19, 1946

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2228690 *Aug 19, 1939Jan 14, 1941Crary Palmer HSanitary paper and rubbish picker
US2390339 *May 9, 1945Dec 4, 1945UllmanMagnetic hand tool
US2405655 *Jan 15, 1945Aug 13, 1946Loretta A CammackPermanent separating magnet
AU122983B * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3078073 *Jun 12, 1961Feb 19, 1963Gzr Co IncElectrical wire finder
US4017082 *Apr 29, 1975Apr 12, 1977Charles E. ChanningMeans and method for placing a golf ball position marker on a putting green and for removal thereof
US5062672 *Dec 13, 1990Nov 5, 1991Harris James ICopy machine remover of paper clips and staples
US5810409 *Feb 13, 1997Sep 22, 1998Hardie; Richard J.Magnetic retrieval device
US5945901 *Aug 18, 1997Aug 31, 1999Ullman Devices CorporationMagnetic head for magnetic pick-up tool
US6392517Nov 7, 2000May 21, 2002Ullman DevicesMagnetic retrieval tool with increased flux
US7350409Nov 2, 2006Apr 1, 2008Darrell Clarry KlattMagnetic separation in fluids
US7591175Feb 29, 2008Sep 22, 2009Darrell Clarry KlattMagnetic separation in fluids
US8424943 *May 19, 2011Apr 23, 2013Terry HarrisMagnetic retrieval system for a golf club
US20120292936 *May 19, 2011Nov 22, 2012Terry HarrisMagnetic retrieval system for a golf club
US20130216350 *Mar 26, 2013Aug 22, 2013Terry HarrisMagnetic retrieval system for a golf club
Classifications
U.S. Classification294/65.5, 335/285, 335/302
International ClassificationB03C1/28, B03C1/02
Cooperative ClassificationB03C1/28
European ClassificationB03C1/28