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Publication numberUS2732634 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 31, 1956
Filing dateJun 16, 1953
Publication numberUS 2732634 A, US 2732634A, US-A-2732634, US2732634 A, US2732634A
InventorsHenry Lipton
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lipton
US 2732634 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 31, 1956 H. LIPTON 2,732,634

WEDGE-HEEL SANDAL CONSTRUCTION Filed June 16, 1953 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR HENRY LIPTON ATTORNEYS Jan. 31, 1956 H. LIPTON I 2,732,534

WEDGE-HEEL SANDAL. CONSTRUCTION Filed June 16, 1953 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR C. 7 HENRY LIPTON T BY M I ATTORNEYS United States Patent() 2,732,634 WEDGE-HEEL SANDAL CONSTRUCTION Henry Lipton, Chicago, Ill. Application June 16, 1953, Serial No. 361,951 2 Claims. (Cl. 3611.5)

This invention relates to wearing apparel and more particularly to footwear of the type commonly known as sandals.

Footwear of this type has been widely used during the warmer months of the year but has possessed the common fault of poor wearing quality. This has been due in a large measure to the particular construction and material employed, the fastening means frequently tearing loose and due to the nature of the materials employed repair has been exceedingly difficult and at times impossible. Since sandals are relatively costly when comparing the overall utility thereof with the conventional shoe it will be seen that any expedient which improves the'wearing qualities while maintaining comfort and maximum exposure to the air is a definite step forward in the art.

It is accordingly an object of the invention to provide a sandal constructed of leather or other suitable similar material such sandal having a pleasing appearance and long wearing qualities.

A further object of the invention is the provision of a sandal in which the foot of the wearer is encased only in a lacing and inwhich such lacing is securelyanchored to a substantial part of the sandal thus precluding separation of the lacing from .the sandal.

A still further object of the invention is the provision of a sandal incorporating a heel portion of normal height and in which the heel structure is entirely enclosed.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a modified type of sandal in which a wedge heel of substantial height is incorporated and in which the heel structure is completely enclosed.

A further object of the invention is the provision of a sandal which vmay be constructed of a minimum number of parts, all of which may be preformed by automatic machinery and the parts assembled at a comparatively low cost.

A still further object of the invention is theprovision of a construction for sandals resulting in providing a sandal having maximum flexibility, long wearing qualities and sandals which are relatively inexpensive to manufacture.

Further objects and advantages of. the invention will be apparent from the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein:

Fig. 1 is a view in perspective showing a sandal constructed in accordance with this invention;

Fig. 2, a view in perspective offthe sandal of Fig. 1 partially disassembled to show the internal structure and process of manufacture;

Fig. 3, a fragmentary sectional view showing the structure of the heel portion of the sandal of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4, a view showing in plan the various parts or blanks utilized in manufacturing the sandal of Fig. 1;

Fig. 5, a view in perspective showing a modified type of sandal and incorporating a'wedge type raised heel;

Fig. 6, an exploded view in perspective showing the relationshipofthe parts of the sandal'ofFig. 5; and

2,732,634 l atented Jan. 31, 1956 Fig. 7, a view showing in plan the various parts utilized to manufacture the sandal of Fig. 5.

With continued reference to the drawing there is shown in Figs. 1 to 4 a sandal having an outsole 10 formed of a single piece of leather or other suitable material and of a configuration generally conforming to the outline of the sole of the foot. As shown in Figs. 2 and 4, an insole 11 is formed with a forepart 12 substantially coextensive with the forepart 13 of the outsole 10, the shank portion 14 and heel portion 15 of the insole 11 being reduced in width so that when the insole 11 is superimposed on the outsole 10 the shank portion 14 and heel portion 15 will be spaced inwardly from the edges thereof to provide a marginal flange 16. The insole 11 is provided with a plurality of apertures 17 in the shank portion and an aperture 18 in the forepart 12, the purpose of which will be presently described.

A sock lining 19 of relatively thin leather or other suitable material and dyed or finished in any desired color is provided with the forepart 20 being substantially coextensive with the forepart 12 of the insole 11 and the forepart 13 of the outsole 10. The shank portion 21 and the heel portion 22, of the lining 19 is somewhat larger than the shank portion 14 and heel portion 15 of the insole 11 thus providing an outwardly extending flap or skirt 23, the purpose of which will presently appear. The lining 19 is also provided with a plurality of apertures 24 in the shank portion 21 and an aperture 25 in the forepart 20, these apertures 24 and 25 being in alignment with the apertures 17 and 18 in the insole 11 when the lining 19 is superimposed on the insole 11.

A heel piece and shank 26 formed of cork, rubber, wood, or other suitable material may be provided and tapers from the heel piece 27 to the shank 28 and in this form of the invention the heel piece 27 is of such thickness as to provide a relatively low heel. If desired, a heel pad 29 of rubber or other suitable yieldablematerial may be provided in order to cushion the heel of a the wearer in the event the heel piece and shank 26 is formed of a rigid material.

The sandal shown in Fig. l is assembled by first .securing the heel piece and shank 26 by a suitable adhesive to the outsole 10 with the heel piece and shank 26 spaced inwardly from the edges of the shank portion 30 and the heel portion 31 of the outsole 10 to provide the marginal flange 16 referred to above. The heel pad 29 is also secured to the upper surface of the heel piece 27 by a suitable adhesive.

The lining 19 is superimposed on'the insole 11 with the apertures 24 and 25 inalignment with the apertures .17 and 18 and secured thereto by a suitable adhesive. A lacing 32 is threaded through the apertures 18 and 25 and securedto the lower surfaceof the insole 11 by any suitable means such as a staple and a second lacing 33 comprising two separate strands are threaded through the apertures 17 and 24 with one end of each strand secured to the lower surface .of the insole 11. by staples 34 or other suitable fastening means and with the free ends 35 of the strands forming the lacing 33 arranged to be passed over the instep of thefootand be tied or otherwise joined in order to secure the sandal to the foot. The remaining portion of the Iacing33 including both strands thereof and the lacing 32v are connected by knotted loops 32' to provide a pocket or upper for the reception of the toes and forepart of the foot.

The insole 11 and lining 19, together with the lacings 32 and 33 are superimposed on the outsole 1t) and the heel piece and shank 1,6 and secured thereto by a suitable adhesive. The flap or skirt 23 of the lining 19 is stretched downwardly overthe heel piece and shank 26 as shown in Figs. 1 and 3 with the outer edge 36' thereof overlying the marginal flange 16. The edge 36 may be secured to the marginal flange 16 by a suitable adhesive and in addition thereto, if desired, the lining 19, insole 11, and outsole may be secured together by stitching 37 extending entirely around the sandal including the forepart thereof and the marginal flange 16.

This results in providing a sandal which is firmly secured together as a unitary structure by a single line of stitching extending entirely around the same and in which the lining is brought downwardly around the heel and shank structure in order to firmly secure the same in place and present a pleasing outward appearance. Relative movement of the various parts of the sandal is prevented and maximum flexibility is provided as well as substantial anchoring means for the lacings which serve to secure the sandal to the foot of the wearer. It will also be seen that the sandal above described provides maximum exposure of the foot since the only covering is the lacings which serve to secure the sandal to the foot and these lacings are relatively thin and cover only a very small area of the skin.

A modified form of the to 7 in which an outsole 33 is provided and in which a relatively high heel is incorporated, this heel being of the wedge type and including a heel wedge piece 39 and a shank 40 which together form a unitary heel wedge 41. The heel wedge 41 may be formed of wood or other suitable substantial rigid material or, if desired, may be made of a semi-yieldable material. The heel wedge and shank 41 may be covered by a heel wedge covering wedge 42 which may be formed of relatively thin leather or other suitable material finished on the outer surface thereof in any desired manner, side pieces 43 and 44 serving to cover the shank 49 of the heel wedge 41 and the central portion 45 serving to cover the heel part 39 of the heel wedge 41. The upper margin 46 of the heel wedge covering piece 42, as shown in Fig. 6, extends over the upper surface of the heel wedge 41 and is secured thereto, while the lower margin 47 of the heel wedge covering piece 42 extends outwardly for a purpose to be presently described.

An insole 48 is provided with a forepart 49 substantially coextensive with the forepart 50 of the outsole 38, and the shank and heel portion of the insole 48 is cut out to provide an opening 51 substantially conforming to the contour of the heel wedge 41 and is provided with a margin 52 surrounding the opening or cut-out 51. The insole 48 is also provided with a tongue 53 extending rearwardly into the opening 51, and tongue 53 is reduced in width and is tapered in thickness from the forepart 49 toward the rear edge of the tongue 53. The forepart 49 of the insole 48 is also provided with an aperture 54.

A sock lining 55 is provided with a forepart 56 substantially coextensive with the forepart 49 of insole 48, and forepart 56 is provided with an aperture 57 which is in alignment with the aperture 54 when the lining 55 is superimposed on the insole 48. The lining 55 is out along a line 57 to provide a tongue 58 substantially coextensive with the upper surface of heel wedge 41 and tongue 58 is provided with a plurality of apertures 59 the purpose of which will presently appear. Also provided by the cut 57 is a margin 64) which is substantially coextensive with the margin 52 of insole 48.

In assembling the sandal shown in Figs. 5 to 7 the heel wedge covering piece 42 is secured to the heel wedge by a suitable adhesive with the lower margin 47 thereof extending outwardly, as shown in Fig. 6, with the upper margin 46 overlying the upper surface of the heel wedge 41. The heel wedge with the heel wedge covering piece 42 applied thereto is next secured to the outsole 38 adjacent the heel portion 61 thereof and spaced inwardly from the edge to provide a marginal flange 62. A suitable adhesive may be employed to secure the heel wedge 41 to the outsole 38. At this time the outwardly extendinvention is shown in Figs. 5 similar to that described above ing margin 47 of the heel wedge covering piece cover 42 will overlie the marginal flange 62. The lining 55 is superimposed on the insole 48 and secured thereto by a suitable adhesive with the apertures 54 and 57 in alignment. A lacing 63 is threaded through the apertures 54 and 57 and secured to the lower surface of the insole 4% by any suitable means such as a staple and the opposite ends of the lacing 63 are threaded through the apertures 59 in the tongue 53. The free ends 64 of the lacing 63 may be utilized to secure the sandal to the foot of the wearer.

The assembled sock lining 55 and insole 48 are superimposed on the outsole 33 with the margins 52 and 60 extending around the heel wedge 41 and overlying the the outwardly extending lower margin 47 of the heel wedge covering piece 42. Also, the tongue 53 overlies the shank 49 of the heel wedge 41 and is secured thereto by a suitable adhesive. The lining 55, insole 48, and outwardly extending portion 47 of the heel wedge covering piece 42 are secured to the outsole 38 by a line of stitching 65 extending entirely around the sandal and the same is completed by securing the tongue 58 of the lining 55 to the upper margin 46 of the heel wedge covering piece 42 and to the upper surface of the heel wedge 41.

It will be seen that the above described modified form of sandal provides a relatively high heel of wedge type in which the heel structure is completely enclosed to present a pleasing appearance but more important to firmly unite all the parts together with a single line of stitching and prevent relative movement therebetween. The tapered formation of the tongue 53 permits attachment of the insole 48 to the heel wedge 51 without causing a ridge or buldge in the upper surface of the lining 55 and this further prevents relative movement between the parts while preserving maximum flexibility. As in the previously described form of the invention the sandal is attached to the foot of the wearer solely by a lacing which covers a minimum area of skin thereby providing maximum exposure of the foot. All of the parts may be economically formed by automatic machinery and the assembly of the sandal as described above is relatively simple resulting in a sandal of relatively low cost which may be sold in a highly competitive market.

It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that various changes may be made in the invention without departing from the spirit and scope thereof and therefore the invention is not limited by that which is shown in the drawings and described in the specification but only as indicated in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. Sole structure comprising an outsole, a heel wedge disposed on said outsole, said outsole extending outwardly of said heel wedge to provide a marginal flange, a heel covering secured to said heel wedge with the lower margin thereof outturned and overlying and secured to said marginal flange, an insole overlying and secured to the forepart of said outsole, a portion of said insole having a cutout with the margin around said cutout engaging the lower margin of said heel covering and secured thereto, a tongue extending from the forepart of said insole into said cutout and being secured to the upper surface of said wedge, a sock lining having the rear portion thereof marginally slit to provide a tongue and marginal strip, said lining being secured to said insole with said last named tongue secured to the upper surface of said heel wedge and with the margin around said last named tongue extending around said heel wedge and having its lower margin outturned and secured to said margin of said insole.

2. A sandal including sole structure as defined in claim 1 and in which said sock lining and insole are provided with an aperture disposed substantially centrally of the forepart thereof, a lacing comprising a single strand having opposite ends extending downwardly through said aperture and secured to said insole, said lining and insole being provided with aligned forward, intermediate and rear pairs of apertures disposed adjacent opposite sides of said sole structure and substantially midway of the length thereof, a second lacing comprising two strands with one end of each strand extending through corresponding ones of said forward pairs of apertures and secured to said insole, said two strands crossing above said lining and extending through said intermediate pairs of apertures and crossing between said insole and outsole with the free ends extending upwardly through said rear pairs of apertures, said first lacing being connected to the crossed strands of said second lacing above said lining to provide a pocket for receiving the foot of the wearer, and the free ends of said second lacing serving to secure said sandal to the foot of the wearer.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Duckett et al July 3, 1917 Carrington July 3, 1923 Von Wilrnowsky Dec. 9, 1930 Willman Oct. 19, 1937 Turner June 15, 1943 Stritter Jan. 18, 1944 Lathan Sept. 5, 1950 Maling Ian. 16, 1951 Walsh Aug. 28, 1951 FOREIGN PATENTS Great Britain Oct. 26, 1943 Australia Feb. 1, 1950

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1231789 *Jan 12, 1916Jul 3, 1917Robert B PuckettMethod for use in heel and heel-seat construction.
US1463672 *Feb 16, 1922Jul 31, 1923Phyllis CarringtonSandal
US1784035 *May 15, 1928Dec 9, 1930Von Wilmowsky Felix FFootwear
US2096269 *Aug 10, 1935Oct 19, 1937Moran Shoe CompanyShoe
US2321713 *May 8, 1941Jun 15, 1943United Shoe Machinery CorpShoe and shoe bottom unit and method of making the same
US2339726 *Mar 11, 1943Jan 18, 1944United Shoe Machinery CorpManufacture of platform shoes
US2521464 *Jan 30, 1947Sep 5, 1950Esdelle Patents LtdMeans for securing soles to uppers of footwear
US2538373 *Nov 4, 1948Jan 16, 1951Margaret A MalingPlatform type shoe
US2565707 *Nov 14, 1947Aug 28, 1951Walsh John JSandal having upstanding thong threaded through an instep strap
AU136184B * Title not available
GB556889A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2947095 *Oct 21, 1957Aug 2, 1960Kiyoichi MiyachiSandal
US2957253 *Feb 25, 1958Oct 25, 1960Jack MeltzerShoe provided with resiliently yieldable element
US3063458 *Oct 4, 1960Nov 13, 1962William M SchollFoot cushioning and supporting sandal
US3352033 *Dec 20, 1966Nov 14, 1967Colley Raymond CLight weight sandal
US7168184 *Apr 12, 2001Jan 30, 2007Kit Shoe LimitedShoes
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/11.5, 36/16, 36/30.00R, 36/172
International ClassificationA43B3/12
Cooperative ClassificationA43B3/128
European ClassificationA43B3/12S