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Publication numberUS2733186 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 31, 1956
Filing dateOct 24, 1951
Priority dateApr 19, 1951
Publication numberUS 2733186 A, US 2733186A, US-A-2733186, US2733186 A, US2733186A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Compositions for the dyeing of hair
US 2733186 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent F COMPOSITIGNS FUR THE DYEING OF HAIR Jacques de Brye, Casablanca, Morocco, assignor to Union Francaise Commerciale et lndustrielle, Casablanca, Morocco, a corporation of Morocco No Drawing. Application October 24, 1?51, Serial No. 252,978

Claims priority, application Morocco April 19, 1951 6 Claims. (U. 16788) This invention relates to compositions for the dyeing or tinting of hair and to methods of use thereof.

It is already known to dye hair by means of unsulphonated benzene naphthalene compounds containing, in their molecule, and in the same nucleus, three oxygen atoms arranged in such manner that the molecule contains both a phenol function and a quinone function.

Examples of such products are 2-hydroxy-1-4-naphthoquinone and the products desulting from the application of the dyeing process described in French Patent No. 826,046, which process makes it possible to obtain the transformation of trihydroxl derivatives into quinone products on the fibre. In all such cases it is only possible to obtain shades from bloude to titian red on live hair with the aid of these products. Deeper shades can only be obtained by means of these products if they are admixed with products already known for dyeing hair, such as phenylenediamines and aminophenols, which are toxic, or by the addition of metallic salts. This latter process presents the disadvantage of not permitting subsequent capillary treatment, such as permanent waving or bleaching.

On the other hand, it is known according to J. L. Stoves and H. Burton (Journal of the Society of Dyers and Colourists, 195066, pages 471 to 478), that trihydroxytoluene, which is capable of acting as a reducing agent for the cystinic linkages of keratin, is capable of reacting with the keratin of the skin, thereby giving shades from brown to black (attributed to the formation of an iron complex) and with the keratin of wool at a specified pH value to give shades from a slightly reddish brown to deep brown, and also in the presence of metallic salts to give shades from medium brown to black.

I have now found a harmless composition for dyeing or tinting hair which renders it possible to obtain shades from blonde to reddish brown and bluish black, without addition of metallic salts or other products which are noxious or inconvenient for a subsequent treatment of the hair.

Accordingly, the present invention provides a composition for the treatment of hair for the purpose of dyeing or tinting which comprises a compound represented by the general formula:

wherein X represents a hydrogen or halogen atom, or an alkyl, alkoxy or hydroxy-alkyl group free from solubilising groups.

In performing the method of the invention, it is preferred to add to said composition, immediately before carrying out the dyeing of the hair, a base or a salt of a base of the group comprising ammonia and primary,

Patented Jan. 31, 1956 in which: I R represents a bivalent aliphatic residue, which may or may not contain an alcoholic function, and Y represents a hydrogen atom or a carboxyl group.

The proportion of reducing agent incorporated in the composition according to the invention permits the speed of development of the shade of dyeing to be regulated, such shade being determined at the time by the nature and relative proportions of the products entering into the final dye obtained after the addition of the base or bases, or a salt of these bases, to this composition at the moment it is used.

It is assumed that the mercaptan not only performs the known function of a reducing agent which assists in the maintenance of the original qualities of the trihydroxyl substance which is used, but it also exerts a chemical or physiochemical action which facilitates the formation of the colouring on the hair; however, the invention is not to be regarded as limited by this theory.

As the invention does not include the addition of metallic salts for any of the shades obtained, it enables the superimposition of dyes and capillary treatments, such as bleaches with persalts and permanent waves to be performed without danger of changing or destroying the hair. This constitutes an essential difference both as regards the process indicated in French Patent No. 826,046 and the publication of Stoves and Burton.

The hair dyed in accordance with this novel process is characterised in all cases by a lustre not hitherto obtained by means of ordinary dyes, and as these products are not toxic, they do not necessitate any special precautions being taken, such as a test lock, which it is essential to carry out with dyes having oxidation colouring agents.

A composition in accordance with the invention is preferably provided in the form of a cream which facilitates the application to the live head of hair, by using in known manner a thickening agent and an agent having dispersive and wetting properties in order to facilitate the penetration of the dye into the hair.

Five examples showing the carrying into effect of the invention are given below, although such examples are not limitative of the scope of the said invention.

Example I 3 parts of 2-4-5-trihydroxytoluene and 0.4 part of thioglycollic acid are added to the cream obtained by emulsifying 20 parts glycol stearate in 77 parts water by means of a product having dispersive and wetting properties (such as sulphonated lauryl alcohol). At the moment of use, 10 parts of a 20% solution of ammonia are added. The mixture obtained is applied to the hair and left for about half-an-hour at 3540C. The hair is then rinsed, washed and dried.

The hairs are dyed black, the dye being particularly fast to washing, rubbing and light.

Example 11 3 parts of 2-4-5-trihydroxytoluene and 0.4 part of thioglycerol are added to a cream obtained by emulsifying 20 parts glycerol stearate in 77 parts water by means of a product having dispersive and wetting properties (such as sulphonated lauryl alcohol). At the moment of use, 2 parts of monoethanolamine are added, the mixture obtained is applied to the hair and left for about half-an-hour at 35-40 C. The hair is rinsed, washed and dried.

The hairs are dyed a deep chestnut brown, the dye being particularly fast to washing, rubbing and light.

Example Ill 3 parts of 2-4-5-trihydroxytoluene and 0.4 part of thicglycollic acid are added to a cream obtained by emulsifying 20 parts of glycol stearate in 77 parts water by means of a product having dispersive and Wetting properties (such as sulphonated lauryl alcohol). At the moment of use, parts of triammonium phosphate are added. The mixture obtained is applied to the hair, left for about halfan-hour at 35-40 C., and the hair is rinsed, washed and dried.

The hair is dyed a deep chestnut brown with a violet glint, the dye being particularly fast to washing, rubbing and light.

Example IV 3 parts of 2-4-S-trihydroxytoluene and 0.4 part of thioglycerol are added to a cream obtained by emulsifying parts of glycerol stearate in 77 parts water by means of a product having dispersing and Wetting properties (such as sulphonated lauryl alcohol). At the moment of use, 3 parts of triethanolamine are added and the mixture ob tained is applied to the hair. It is left for about half-anhour at 35-40" C. and the hair is then rinsed, washed and dried.

The hair is dyed auburn, the dye being particularly fast to washing, rubbing and light.

Example V 3 parts of 2-4-5-trihydroxytoluene and 0.4 part of thiolactic acid are added to a cream obtained by emulsifying 20 parts of glycol stearate in 77 parts water, by means of a product having dispersing and wetting properties (such as sulphonated lauryl alcohol). At the moment of use, 2.5 parts of morpholine are added. The mixture obtained is applied to the hair, and left for about half-an-hour at 35-40 C. The hair is then rinsed, washed and dried.

The hairs are dyed a shade from golden blonde to light auburn.

What I claim is:

l. A hair-dyeing composition comprising an intimate mixture of a compound free from any solubilizing group and represented by the formula (WP-X O H wherein X is a monovalent radical selected from the class consisting of hydrogen, halogens, alkyl, alkoxy and bydroxyalkyl groups, a me rcaptan reducing agent represented by the formula wherein R is a bivalent aliphatic residue and Y is selected from the class consisting of hydrogen and a carboxyl group, in combination with a base added immediately prior to the application of said composition to the hair, said base being selected from the class consisting of ammonia, an aliphatic amine and a cycloaliphatic amine.

2. A hair-dyeing composition as set forth in claim 1, including a thickening agent.

3. A hair-dyeing composition as set forth in claim 1, including a thickening agent and a wetting and dispersing agent.

4. A hair-dyeing composition comprising an intimate mixture of a compound free from any solubilizing group and represented by the formula wherein X is a monovalent radical selected from the class consisting of a hydrogen, halogens, alkyl, alkoxy and hydroxyalkyl groups, a mercaptan reducing agent represented by the formula wherein R is a bivalent aliphatic residue and Y is selected from the class consisting of hydrogen and a carboxyl group, in combination with a salt adapted to liberate a base added immediately prior to the application of said composition to the hair, said base being selected from the class consisting of ammonia, an aliphatic amine and a cycloaliphatic amine.

5. A hair-dyeing composition as set forth in claim 4, including a thickening agent.

6. A hair-dyeing composition as set forth in claim 4, including a thickening agent and a wetting and dispersing agent.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNiTED STATES PATENTS 2,162,458 Lehmann June 13, 1939 2,610,941 Schueller Sept. 16, 1952 FOREIGN PATENTS 486,086 Great Britain May 26, 1938 951,538 France Oct. 27, 1949 OTHER REFERENCES

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2162458 *May 4, 1937Jun 13, 1939Winthrop Chem Co IncHair dye
US2610941 *Jan 16, 1948Sep 16, 1952L Oreal SocHair-dye compositions
FR951538A * Title not available
GB486086A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2975101 *Jan 17, 1958Mar 14, 1961OrealDyeing of hair and other keratinous materials
US3920384 *Jul 17, 1974Nov 18, 1975Clairol IncAutoxidizable hair dye containing preparations
US3954393 *Aug 29, 1973May 4, 1976Combe, Inc.Hair dyeing composition containing bismuth citrate, triethanolamine and sulfur
US4054413 *Apr 23, 1975Oct 18, 1977Clairol IncorporatedAutoxidizable hair dye containing preparations
US4195972 *Oct 20, 1978Apr 1, 1980Combe IncorporatedAqueous-based hair dyeing composition containing a soluble bismuth salt and a reducing compound
US4306873 *Oct 30, 1979Dec 22, 1981Combe IncorporatedAqueous-based hair dyeing composition containing a soluble bismuth salt complex and a reducing compound
Classifications
U.S. Classification8/424, 8/432
International ClassificationA63F3/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/0494, A61K8/347, A61Q5/10
European ClassificationA63F3/04T, A61K8/34F, A61Q5/10