Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2734284 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 14, 1956
Filing dateApr 23, 1953
Publication numberUS 2734284 A, US 2734284A, US-A-2734284, US2734284 A, US2734284A
InventorsAnton Seurbom
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Seurbom
US 2734284 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 14, 1956 SEURBOM 2,734,284

ADJUSTABLE SHOE Filed April 23, 1953 IN VEN TOR.

$2 2570 lzurom United States Patent ADJUSTABLE SHOE Anton Seurbom, Chicago, Ill.

Application April 23, 1953, Serial No. 350,660

11 Claims. (Cl. 36--2.5)

This invention relates to shoe constructions, and more particularly to adjustable shoes.

My invention is concerned primarily with shoes adapted for use by manikins. It is well known that the feet'of manikins are stiff and therefore it is difficult, if not impossible, to fit ordinary shoes over them. Moreover, it has been very difiicult for a single decorator to put shoes on a manikin operating by himself in a confined store window area. For this reason, shoes once placed on a Inanikin are usually left on, regardless of the change in season or the attire of the manikin. Needless to say, shoes left on a manikin are subject to deterioration due to overexposure to sunlight and gradually lose their attractive appearance.

it is therefore an object of my invention to provide a shoe that can be more readily fitted to a manikins foot than any heretofore known.

As a rule there is no standard foot size for manikins, and therefore it is necessary to provide shoes of different sizes for them. This requires the stocking of various sizes of shoes which is an item of considerable expense .in the upkeep of a manikin.

it is an object of my invention to provide a shoe that 'will fit any size of foot, thereby eliminating the purchasing of different size shoes for each manikin.

I have noted that one of the difiiculties of placing shoes on manikins is that the type of shoes now used or shown in the prior art requires the use of two hands and even then is difiicult to manage. My invention eliminates this difficulty by providing a simple locking device that requires the use of only one hand of the decorator.

.ln manikin shoes it is unnecessary to have the shoe fit perfectly, but it is of the utmost importance that the shoe appear to fit perfectly. I have found that a manikin shoe .appears to fit perfectly if it fits tightly across the instep or arch of the foot. Accordingly, an object of my invention is to provide a manikin shoe that fits perfectly across the {instep or arch, thereby giving the appearance of a per- ;fect fit.

It is a further object of my invention to provide shoes .for manikins that may be easily assembled by a single decorator working in a confined area.

It is a further object of my invention to provide shoes that may be very economically constructed.

It is also contemplated to provide shoes of diiferent .colors and adapted for different types of attire and proper for each season.

The present invention lends itself to a simple arrangement whereby the toe section of the shoe is adjustable laterally, thereby providing for a perfect fit across the instep of the manikin, and for longitudinal association between the toe and heel sections whereby the heel is 'bayonetted into the toe section and secured against longitudinal displacement.

In my invention I contemplate securing the parts tosgether by the use of a dead center locking device which facilitates rapid one hand assembly of a shoe on the foot .of a manikin.

2,734,284 Patented Feb. 14, 1956 ice My invention is adapted to any type of shoe, including low heels, high heels, boudoir slippers, mules, elevator soles, etc.

The foregoing and other objects will be more apparent from the following detailed description when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Fig. l is a perspective view of the shoe construction contemplated by the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary top plan view showing the means whereby longitudinal and lateral adjustment of the shoe construction is made possible;

Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken along the line 3--3 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is an exploded perspective view of my invention;

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along the line 55 of Fig. 2, and showing the shoe assembled;

Fig. 6 shows an alternative clamping means for securing the parts against longitudinal and lateral displacement.

Referring now to the drawings .more in detail, wherein like numerals have been employed to designate similar parts throughout the figures, it will be seen that my shoe construction consists of a heel covering member or quarter portion 8 and a toe or toe-covering member or portion 10. The heel and toe portions may be made of any suitable material such as leather, cloth, plastic, papier mache, or artificial leather. The sole i2 is sewn, glued, or otherwise attached to the toe portion it), and a heel elevation member 14 is affixed to the heel covering portion 8 by any suitable means such as sewing, gluing, stapling or nailing. Between the heel elevation member 14 and the heel covering portion 8 is an insole l6 affixed to the heel portion and heel elevation member by any suitable means.

in my invention, the toe portion 10 and the heel portion 8 are made separately and are assembled on the foot 18 of a manikin by bayonetting them together. The heel and toe portions are secured against longitudinal displacement by a fastening means 20.

Referring now to Fig. 4, it will be seen that the sole 12 is made of two layers of material, 22 and 24. Any suitable material may be used, such as leather, cardboard, plastic, papier mache, or artificial leather. The layer 24 comprises the outer sole of the toe portion and layer 22 comprises the insole of the toe portion. These portions are secured together as at 26 by sewing, gluing, stapling or nailing.

It will be noted that the outer sole 24 is provided with an opening having transverse edges 28 and 30 at the be ginning of the instep, and these transverse edges extend from the outer extremities of the shoe to points 32 and 34. From the points 32 and 34 the opening in the outer sole is provided with longitudinal edges 35 and 37 to form a strap portion 36. The strap is apertured at 38 for a purpose to be presently described.

The insole portion 22 overlies the outer sole 24 and the toe covering member ill is sewn or otherwise attached therebetween. The insole portion 22 is provided with a transverse edge 40 which is parallel to and spaced a bit forwardly of the transverse edges 28 and 30 of the outersole 24.

Extending from the insole in the direction of the heel are transverse adjustable arms 42 and 44. These arms are made of any suitable stiff material, suchras cardboard, leather or artificial leather. The outer marginal portions of arms 42 and 44 correspond to the outer configuration of the shoe. The inner margin of the arm 42, starting at the outer extremity of edge 40, is provided with a diagonal edge 45 extending toward the center of the shoe, which may be at an angle of approximately forty-five degrees to the outer margin. Diagonal edge 46 forms the next section of the inner margin and extends towards the outer margin forming an angle which may be approximately ninety degrees with diagonal edge 45. A

third diagonal edge 48 is provided which extends inwardly from the outer end of edge 46, this edge forming an angle which may be approximately ninety degrees with diagonal edge 46. The final edge 50 of arm 42 extends from the extremity of edge 48 in a curve back to the outer margin of the shoe. Ann 42 is further provided with a rectangular hole 52. This elongated rectangular hole 52 is placed at an angle which may be approximately forty degrees to edge 48, and runs between edge 43 and edge 50. As is shown in Fig. 4, arm 44 is formed in a manner similar to arm 42 and is provided with rectangular hole 53.

The toe cap portion is glued, sewn, or otherwise attached to the top surface of arms 42 and 44.

The purpose of the various edges is to permit the trans verse adjustment of the toe portion of the shoe, thereby permitting convenient application of the toe portion to the foot of a manikin, and thereafter adjusting the arms 42 and 44 to give a perfect fit of the shoe in the region of the manikins instep.

As will appear presently, the elongated rectangular openings cooperate with other parts to secure the arms 42 and 44 against lateral displacement.

Referring now to the heel portion, the heel insole 54 has an outer margin corresponding to the configuration of the heel. The heel insole covers the area over the heel elevation member 14, and the leather or fabric covering the foot is sewn, glued, or otherwise attached between the insole 54 and the heel elevation member 14.

The portion of the heel insole 54 over the instep 56 is provided with transverse edges 58 and 6t). Edges 62 and 64 extend toward the heel section and are disposed at an angle which may be approximately one hundred degrees to edges 58 and 60. Edges 66 and 68 extend from the ends of edges 62 and 64 and form an angle which may be approximately one hundred and twenty degrees therewith. Edges 66 and 68 extend clear to the margin of the shoe and as Will be seen allow a bending of the heel fabric 8 to conform with the shape of a manikin foot. Finally, edges 70 and 72 are provided to complete the inner margin of the heel insole 54. Edges 70 and 72 describe an angle which may be approximately fortyfive degrees with edges 66 and 68. It is to be noted that edges 62 and 64 are substantially parallel when the heel is aflixed to the foot of a manikin, but this position may be varied depending on the size of the manikins foot. Having described the edges in the instep or shank portion 56 specifically, the areas so described may be referred to more generally as projections in the form of tabs or arms 74 and 76, whose function will presently be described.

The assembly of the heel and toe sections is effected by the use of a washer 78 and a fastener locking device 80. The fastener locking device 80 is composed of a piece of sheet metal 84 bent intermediate its ends, with a hole 86 on one end 87 adjacent the bend, and a cut out portion 88 on the other end 89 adjacent the bend. A cotter pin 90 is inserted over the bend with one arm of the cotter pin extending through the aperture 86 and the other through the cut away portion 88.

Substantially all of the parts of my invention having been described, there remains to be described the manner in which they are assembled. The assembly of the parts is best shown in Fig. 2 wherein they are shown in assembled relationship. The parts are first loosely assembled by partially bayonetting the projections in the form of tabs or arms 74 and 76 of the heel portion beneath the washer 78 in the toe assembly. The arms 42 and 44 of the toe assembly are spread laterally to permit easy access of the heel portion into a position in which inserts 74 and 76 underlie washer 78.

As shown in Figs. 2, 3 and 5, cotter pin 90 is first passed through the hole 38 in the strap 36, and then passes through the elongated rectangular slot 52.01; arm 42. Arm 42 is placed over arm 44 in such a manner that they overlap, and the cotter pin is then inserted into the elongated rectangular slot 53 of arm 44. At this point in the assembly, the washer 78 is loosely fitted over the cotter pin 9:) and the arms of the cotter pin are spread. It should be noted that the arms of the cotter pin are not spread in such a manner as to tightly hold the elements together, but loosely so as to permit free movement of the arms 42 and 44 relative to the strap 36, and to provide for the assembly of projections in the form of tabs or arms 74 and 76 therewith.

The loosely assembled shoe is then placed over the foot 18 of a manikin. To complete the assembly, the heel portion is further longitudinally bayonetted into the toe portion until a perfect longitudinal fitting is obtained. At this point the projections in the form of tabs or arms 74 and 7e are pressed inwardly, thereby obtaining a snug fit over the heel and upper instep portion of the manikin. The arms 42 and 44 of the toe portion are then pressed inwardly, as provided for by the elongated rectangular apertures 52 and 53, to obtain a perfect fit of the shoe over the toe and lower instep portion. The shoe is now perfectly fitted, or appears to be perfectly fitted to the foot of the manikin, and there remains only the securing of the parts in such a manner as to prevent longitudinal and lateral movement of the parts so assembled.

Referring to Fig. 5, the securing of the parts against longitudinal and transverse movement is accomplished by swinging the free end 37 of the fastener locking device 80 from the dash line position of Fig. 5 past dead center to the full line position, thereby bringing the end 89 into contact with the shoe and pressing the parts together. The free end 3'7 is swung through an are which may be approximately one hundred and sixty degrees, and the end 39 is thereby moved over the sole until the cut away portion 88 is slightly beyond dead center of the aperture 38 and the locking completed.

Fig. 6 shows another form of fastening or locking device which may be used with my invention. Washers 92 and 94 are placed on the outer and inner sides of the layers to be locked together. Washer 96 is a spring steel convex washer superimposed over the lower Washer 94. A handle 98 is apertured near one end thereof, and cut out at the extreme end thereof, leaving a bar of metal between the aperture and cut out end portion. A resilient metal strap 99 is positioned in such a way that one arm passes through the aperture in the handle and the other arm passes through the cut out portion. Both arms of the metal strap are then passed through the washers and separated as at 100, 102, 104 and 106.

The bends and N2 in metal strap 99 provide the locking function in the device and the ends 1&4 and 106 are spread for the purpose of clearing the arch of the manikins foot. The device is locked by moving one end of the handle 98 through an are, thereby spreading the arms of the metal strap 99, and forcing the other end of the handle against the convex spring steel washer 96, which action presses the work pieces together. When the handle engaging the washer 96 passes dead center the spring is released and the device is locked.

Having described the parts and operation of my invention it will be seen that it provides a means for longitudinal and transverse adjustment of a shoe to fit any foot and to provide a perfect fit thereon.

The dead center locking device of my invention provides for rapid one hand assembling of a shoe on the foot of a manikin. A decorator working by himself in a confined area can readily assemble the shoe with one hand.

My shoe is economical to produce and can be made from a variety of materials.

My invention is also adapted for shoes in which there is a toe portion and sole portion only, such as mules and boudoir slippers.

While I have described a specific constructional embodiment of my invention, it is obvious that desired changes in the shape and material of the parts and in their relative arrangement may be made to suit the requirements of different shoe designs and uses within the spirit and scope of my invention.

I claim:

1. A shoe construction comprising separate toe and quarter portions, means for connecting and relatively longitudinally preserving adjustment of said toe and heel portions, said quarter portion including means for preserving adjustment of the width across the shank, said quarter portion shank adjustment means including tabs carried by the forward member of said quarter portion, said toe portion including means for preserving adjustment of the width across the shank, said toe portion shank adjustment means including apertured arms carried by the sole of the shank portion of said toe portion, said connecting means comprising a strap extending from the outer sole of said toe portion and tabs carried by the forward member of said quarter portion, said tabs, apertured arms, and strap being adapted to overlie each other, and means for securing said connecting means, quarter portion adjustment means, and toe portion adjustment means against lateral and longitudinal displacement.

2. A shoe construction comprising separate quarter and toe portions, the quarter portion having inwardly projecting tabs at the forward end thereof with the inner edges of the tabs spaced apart, the toe portion having inwardly projecting arms adapted to lap with one another and also with the tabs on the quarter portion to provide a shank portion relatively shiftable in a longitudinal direction to vary the length of the shoe, each tab and each arm being relatively shiftable transversely with respect to the opposite arm and tab to vary the width of the shank and thereby the instep portion of the shoe, and means for securing said arms and tabs in predetermined adjusted position to thus secure the quarter and toe portions against relative displacement.

3. A shoe construction comprising separate and independent quarter and toe portions, the quarter portion having inwardly projecting arms and the toe portion having inwardly projecting arms lapping with the arms on the quarter portion and said lapping arms providing the shank portion of the shoe between the quarter and toe portions, said lapping arms being shiftable in unison transversely of the shank portion formed thereby to vary the width of the shank portion, and means for securing the lapping arms in predetermined adjusted position and including a single operator for clamping the same whereby to facilitate fitting of the shoe by a single decorator.

4. A shoe construction comprising separate and independent quarter and toe portions, the quarter portion having inwardly projecting arms and the toe portion having inwardly projecting arms lapping with the arms on the quarter portion and said lapping arms providing the shank portion of the shoe between the quarter and toe portions, said lapping arms being shiftable in unison transversely of the shank portion formed thereby to vary the width of the shank portion and said lapping arms being relatively slidable with respect to one another longitudinally of the 6 shank portion to vary the length thereof, and means for securing the lapping arms in predetermined adjusted position and including a single operator for clamping the same whereby to facilitate fitting of the shoe by a single decorator.

5. A shoe construction as claimed in claim 3, wherein the securing means includes a fastener element projecting through the shank portion and a latching lever having an offset portion connected to the fastener element and shiftable beyond its dead center to clamp the lapping arms against displacement.

6. A shoe construction as claimed in claim 3, wherein the inwardly projecting arms on the quarter and toe portions are arranged in opposed pairs with the arms constituting one pair being also lapped and provided with transversely extending slots, and wherein the securing means includes a fastener element projecting through said slots.

7. A shoe construction as claimed in claim 3, wherein the toe portion is provided with an insole which insole is provided with a central strap which is apertured to receive a fastener element included in the securing means for the lapping arms.

8. A shoe construction comprising separate quarter and toe portions, the quarter portion having inwardly projecting tabs at the forward end thereof with the inner edges of the tabs spaced apart, the toe portion having inwardly projecting arms adapted to lap with one another and also with the tabs on the quarter portion to provide a shank portion relatively shiftable in a longitudinal direction to vary the length of the shoe, each tab and each arm being relatively shiftable transversely with respect to the opposite arm and tab to'vary the width of the shank and thereby the instep portion of the shoe, and securing means engaging the outer surfaces of said tabs and arms and including a single operator for clamping the same whereby to facilitate fitting of the shoe by a single decorator.

9. A shoe construction as claimed in claim 8, wherein the ends of the arms adjacent the toe portion and the ends of the tabs adjacent the quarter portion are cut away to facilitate transverse movement thereof toward and away from one another.

10. A shoe construction as claimed in claim 8, wherein the arms are provided with transverse slots in alignment with one another, and wherein the securing means includes a fastener element projecting through said slots.

11. A shoe construction as claimed in claim 8, wherein the insole of the toe portion is provided with a strap member extending between said arms and wherein the arms and strap are apertured to receive therethrongh a fastener element.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 228,697 Thompson June 8, 1880 641,642 Gunn Ian. 16, 1900 2,112,052 Smith Mar. 22, 1938 2,405,251 Glaze Aug. 6, 1946

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US228697 *Mar 15, 1880Jun 8, 1880 Nathan thompson
US641642 *May 12, 1899Jan 16, 1900Selim W GunnShoe.
US2112052 *Sep 28, 1934Mar 22, 1938Smith Norman BShoe construction
US2405251 *Apr 10, 1944Aug 6, 1946Paul HenryClamping device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3225462 *Jan 13, 1965Dec 28, 1965Martin J LambertiConvertible shoes
US3541708 *Mar 26, 1968Nov 24, 1970Rosen Henri ElliottShoe construction
US4120103 *Sep 22, 1977Oct 17, 1978Colby Robert DDisposable bowling shoe
US5241762 *Mar 31, 1992Sep 7, 1993Rosen Henri EAdjustable fit shoe construction
US5481814 *Sep 22, 1994Jan 9, 1996Spencer; Robert A.Snap-on hinged shoe
US6217039Aug 27, 1998Apr 17, 2001Minson Enterprises Co., Ltd.Adjustable skate
US6237255 *Aug 12, 1997May 29, 2001Mod′8Device for adjusting the dimensions of a shoe, in particular a child's shoe and shoe equipped with same
US6438872Nov 12, 1999Aug 27, 2002Harry Miller Co., Inc.Expandable shoe and shoe assemblies
US6471219Mar 21, 2000Oct 29, 2002Benetton Sportsystem Usa, Inc.Adjustable fit in-line skate
US6574888Sep 10, 2001Jun 10, 2003Harry Miller Company, Inc.Expandable shoe and shoe assemblies
US6588771Jun 11, 2002Jul 8, 2003Benetton Sportsystem Usa, Inc.Adjustable fit in-line skate
US6807754Aug 26, 2002Oct 26, 2004Inchworm, Inc.Expandable shoe and shoe assemblies
US6817116Jul 9, 2002Nov 16, 2004Inchworm, Inc.Expandable shoe and shoe assemblies
US6883254May 16, 2003Apr 26, 2005Inchworm, Inc.Expandable shoe and shoe assemblies
US6916027Dec 19, 2002Jul 12, 2005Minson Enterprises, Co. Ltd.Adjustable skate
US6918601May 18, 2001Jul 19, 2005K-2 CorporationTool-less size-adjustable in-line skate
US6983942Dec 19, 2002Jan 10, 2006Minson Enterprises Co., Ltd.Adjustable skate
US7055268 *Oct 29, 2004Jun 6, 2006Shin Kyung Chemical Co., Ltd.Length-adjustable shoe
US7080468May 14, 2004Jul 25, 2006Inchworm, Inc.Expandable shoe and shoe assemblies
US7137635Jan 30, 2004Nov 21, 2006K-2 CorporationExpandable in-line skate
US7152865Dec 18, 2002Dec 26, 2006Minson Enterprises Co., Ltd.Heel adjustable skate
US7287294Oct 22, 2004Oct 30, 2007Harry Miller Co., Inc.Method of making an expandable shoe
US7581337Jun 24, 2004Sep 1, 2009Inchworm, Inc.Expandable shoe having screw drive assemblies
US8245418Mar 1, 2008Aug 21, 2012Paintin Janet AFront-opening footwear systems
US20020170206 *Jul 9, 2002Nov 21, 2002Harry Miller Co., Inc.Expandable shoe and shoe assemblies
US20030111808 *Dec 19, 2002Jun 19, 2003Minson Enterprises Co., Ltd.Adjustable skate
US20030116929 *Dec 19, 2002Jun 26, 2003Minson Enterprises Co., Ltd.Adjustable skate
US20030192204 *May 16, 2003Oct 16, 2003Harry Miller Co., Inc.Expandable shoe and shoe assemblies
US20040094916 *Jul 7, 2003May 20, 2004Olson Todd JackAdjustable fit in-line skate
US20040217562 *Jan 30, 2004Nov 4, 2004Haugen Darrin JohnExpandable in-line skate
US20050050772 *May 14, 2004Mar 10, 2005Harry Miller Co., Inc.Expandable shoe and shoe assemblies
US20050055848 *Jun 24, 2004Mar 17, 2005Harry Miller Co., Inc.Expandable shoe having screw drive assemblies
US20050055849 *Oct 29, 2004Mar 17, 2005Shin Kyung Chemical Co., Ltd.Length-adjustable shoe
US20050060913 *Nov 15, 2004Mar 24, 2005Inchworm, Inc.Expandable shoe and shoe assemblies
US20050066548 *Nov 15, 2004Mar 31, 2005Inchworm, Inc.Expandable shoe and shoe assemblies
US20050115113 *Oct 22, 2004Jun 2, 2005Harry Miller Co., Inc.Method of making an expandable shoe
US20070039208 *Mar 2, 2006Feb 22, 2007Fila Luxembourg S.A.R.L.Adaptable shoe having an expandable sole assembly
US20070039209 *Mar 2, 2006Feb 22, 2007Fila Luxembourg S.A.R.L.Method and system for providing a customized shoe
US20070043582 *Mar 2, 2006Feb 22, 2007Fila Luxembourg S.A.R.L.Method and system for providing customized footwear to a retail consumer
US20080141562 *Dec 13, 2006Jun 19, 2008Fila Luxembourg S.A.R.L.Adjustable arch support assembly
US20090217552 *Mar 1, 2008Sep 3, 2009Paintin Janet AFront-opening footwear systems
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/97, 36/8.1, 411/511, 24/498
International ClassificationA43B3/26, A43B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B3/26
European ClassificationA43B3/26