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Publication numberUS2734774 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 14, 1956
Filing dateJun 15, 1951
Publication numberUS 2734774 A, US 2734774A, US-A-2734774, US2734774 A, US2734774A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
manseau
US 2734774 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

D. O. MANSEAU Feb. 14, 1956 SPRAY NOZZLE AND VALVE ACTUATING MECHANISM Filed June 15, 1951 INVENTOR. 0A V/D 0. MAI/$2540 United States Patent SPRAY NOZZLE AND VALVE ACTUATING MECHANISM David O. Manseau, Southfield Township, Oakland County, Mich.

Application June 15, 1951, Serial No. 231,761

7 Claims. (Cl. 299-95) This invention generally relates to release and throttling valves, and in particular to an aerosol bomb release, relief, expansion, and throttling valve and a directional spray nozzle or jet capable of accurately directing and controlling the emitted particles.

The recent development of pressurized containers containing product, solvents, propellents, and dispersents, commonly called aerosol bombs, has introduced to common use means and methods of packaging and dispensing insecticides, paints, food and cosmetic products, and many other items. In the established art the container or can is equipped with a releasable valve and is charged with container gases so that upon release of the valve the product emits from the can as a spray or foam as desired.

Some of the bombs in present use are equipped with a threaded neck and a spring-pressed ball seatable in a spherical ball seat immediately belowthe neck and others are equipped with mechanically equivalent means. The ball is moved ofi the seat by a hand-actuatedpin thereby releasing the pressurized contents of the can, which pin is sometimes incorporated with the can or mounted by the user in attaching a releasing head on the can neck.

The pressure in the can is relatively high and the releasable valve on the can now in general use looses the entire pressure against the emitting jet so that the gases and product upon release to atmosphere via the jet expand in atmosphere and widly disperse the can contents without the benefit of direction influence so that the product becomes mainly airborne whether or not so desired.

The bombs have heretofore been equipped with a round hole jet so that the projected gases upon release follow a path of spiral gyration or toroidal gyration, which involves circular travel and forward travel. This may be an advantage in some instances such as spraying the atmosphere of a room with insecticide, and perfumed scents, and the like, but it is a definite disadvantage in spraying paint, for example, where forward, direct travel to cover a desired surface, is essential. In painting etc., the misdirected airborne particles which miss their target are not only lost but also constitute nuisance, contamination, and additional loss.

When certain liquids and fluids are forced to move in a round conduit, there is present a phenomenon in the movement of the liquids and fluids wherein the mass has a spiral motion, moving about a number of times in a circular fashion to a unit of time while also moving in a lineal direction; generally the total movement is often greater in the spiral gyration than in the lineal distance traveled. Upon jet projection of such a mass, great dissipation results.

Pressure dispensing containers have a round conduit leading from the lower inside end of the container to the dispensing mechanism, and since it is under pressure, ranging from 25 to 70 pounds per square inch, there is found a spiral gyration of the mass upon being released. This container content quickly finds its way through a round dispensing orifice having diameters ranging from 10 to 18 thousands of an inch. Immediately upon going through this orifice a rather wide spray is formed and since the product is already spirally turbulent, and, since the orifice is round, it too, provides a round conduit for the further spiral behavior of the product thereby preventing directional control as the formulated product leaves the orifice in a spirally turbulent state continuing the spiral motion of the product in the conduit.

There are surfaces having relatively narrow dimensions in planes heretofore described and a wide round spray as heretofore used cannot economically cover narrow surfaces. The spray is too large, the distance too great. The instant mechanism, because of its rectangular orifice, arrests the spiral gyration of the material from the nozzle position to the surface, and because the spray pattern, is narrow and long, it covers very narrow strips of material. The spray has no appreciable gyration or turbulence, and there is a relatively much smaller degree of misdirected airborne product particles. The nozzle can be placed within four to six inches away from the surface due to less turbulence at the nozzle, thereby improving the users aim and avoiding damage to other surfaces.

It has been found that using this new valve actuating mechanism and spray nozzle in comparison to other types of valves and dispensing mechanisms, some 30% to 40% more surface area can be covered with the same amount of product. This is due of course, to the adjustable rectangular dispensing orifice which prevents much airborne losses as well as the other elements of the instant invention.

With the foregoing in view an object of the invention is to provide a valve head with an expansion chamber therein to allow partial expansion of the gases prior to jetting and to permit the product carrier to become thoroughly mixed with the product prior to jet projection under pressure conditions closer to atmospheric.

An object of the invention is to provide a slot-type jet of narrow, rectangular configuration so that a narrow sheet of spray is emitted thereby eliminating the toroidal, spiral spray usually inherently emitting from a round jet.

An object of the invention is to provide a rotatable plug for the slot-jet and other shaped non-round jet so that the sheet spray pattern can be adjusted in any desired plane.

An object of the invention is to provide a valve release mechanism which is readily dis-assembled so that it can be readily and thoroughly cleaned.

An object of the invention is to provide a throttling valve incorporating novel throttling means in conjunction with the ball actuator pin and which may be used to activate or release any other type can-valve or can-valve released mechanism.

These and other objects of the instant invention will become apparent by reference to the following description of an aerosol bomb dispensing head embodying the invention taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which:

Fig. l is a side elevational view of an aerosol bomb equipped with one form of the inventive dispensing head or valve.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged cross-sectional view of the head of Fig. 1, showing a portion of the can.

Fig. 3 is a face elevational view of the slit-jet plug of Fig. 1 taken in the direction of the arrow 3 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a view similar to Fig. 2 showing another embodiment of the invention.

Fig. 5 is a cross-sectional view of Fig. 4 taken on the line 5-5 thereof showing the pin and throttle construction.

Fig. 6 is a face elevational view of a modified slit-jet taken in the direction of arrow 6 of Fig. 4; and

Fig. 7 is a face elevational view of a modified inventive non circular jet slit.

Referring now to the drawing wherein like numerals More particularly Figs. 1 to 3, the inventive dispensing.

head comprises a resilient body 16, a threaded portion 11 threadable on the neck 12 of a can 13 or otherwise attachable, a chamber 14 communicable with the vent 14 in the can neck 12, a cylinder 16 preferably axially aligned with the vent communicating with the chamber 14, a pin 17 snugly disposed in the cylinder 16 leading through the chamber 14 and through the vent 15 in the can 13 to a point above the upwardly spring-pressed ball 18 closing the vent 15, a truncated conical or tapered portion 19 on the pin 17 adapted to sealably eclude the top of the cylinder 16 as the lower end of the pin 17 displaces the ball 18 from its seat 29 to release the pressurized contents of the can into the chamber 14 where the released contents of the can are mixed at reduced pressure, a finger cap 21 on the pin 17; the resilient body 19 being capable of forcing the pin 17 upwardly after manual release by squeezing same upwardly via the tapered portion 19; a second chamber 22 communicably intersecting the first chamber 14 intermediate its length so that the blindend 23 acts as a ram head for dissipating directional influences and spurting in the released can contents and for further expanding the released can contents, a rotatable plug 24 having a non-round, preferably narrow, rectangular slit or slot 25 therein for projecting the released can contents in a sheet configuration to provide controlled direction and to avoid spiral gyrational dissipation involved in the use of a round jet aperture. With present can pressure and density of can contents at jet slot .009 inch by .030 inch has been found to effect desired results.

Referring to the device of Figs. 4 to 6, another form of the invention comprises, in conjunction with a can having a threaded neck 31, a valve seat 32, a spring pressed valve 33 and a vent 34; a resilient body 35, a threaded portion threadable on a can neck 31, a first chamber 37 axially communicable with a vent, a second expansion chamber 38 communicating intermediate its length with the first chamber 37, a rotatable sleeve 39 sealably disposed in the chamber 38 having a slot 40 therein optionally communicable with the chamber 37, a hollow knob 41 communicating with the interior of the sleeve 39 providing a blind ram-head end in the sleeve 33 and chamber 38, a narrow, rectangular slot or slit 42 in the sleeve end 43 providing a projecting jet, a second slot 44 in the sleeve 38 registering preferably at 180 degrees with the slot 40 therein, a cylinder 45 axially aligned with the chamber 37, a can-valve operating pin 46 disposed snugly in the cylinder 45 extending through the slots 40 and 44 in the sleeve 38 and extending through the chamber 37 to a point above a valve 33, a finger cap 47 on the pin 46, a truncated conical or tapered portion 48 on the pin 46 adapted to sealably eclude the top of the cylinder 45 as the bottom end 49 of the pin 46 moves downwardly to displace the cam valve 33 ott its seat 32 to release the cam 30 contents. Fig. 7 shows a modified jet non-circular orifice 50 in the discular head 51 which is applicable to any device such as seen in Figs. 2 and 4.

The tapered or truncated conical portions 19 and 48 of the operating pins in conjunction with the resilient bodies 10 and 35 make the operating self-releasing relative to the cam valve in that upon release of the operators finger, the resilient body forces the operating pin upwardly by ejecting the conical portion of same from its area.

The dispensing and throttling valve seen in Figs. 4 and S is capable of completely shutting-01f flow from the can in that the sleeve 39 defining the slot 30 is arcuately formedat its ends to eclude with the pin 46 so as to seal in conjunction therewith. The arcuate end of the slot 40 seals against the pin 46 and bends the pin 46 over against the side wall of the chamber 37, thereby sealing the chamber at the other side.

In operation, the user screws a head 10 or 35 on a can 13 or 30, depresses the pin 16 or 46 to move the ball 18 or valve 33 off their respective seats and the can contents are then released into the chambers 14 or 37 Where they expand. In the device of Fig. 1 they directionally project themselves against the blind end 33, reverse and escape through the chamber 22 whereupon passing hereinto they are intersected by later released can contents so that as the contents expand in the chambers 14 and 22 they are subjected to a mixing action. In the device of Fig. 4, the can contents are expanded in the chamber 37 and escape therefrom into the chamber 38 as lined by the sleeve 39 where they are further expanded. The knob 41 provides a ram-head for dissipating pulsation in the released can contents which move back and forth in the chamber 38' where they are intersected, expanded, and mixed prior to release via the jet aperture.

The slit-jet or non-round jet arrests spiral and/or toroidal gyration of projected product and atfords a spray pattern as desired thereby providing direction and eliminating diminution of otherwise escaping or misdirected airborne product.

The general proportions and relationship of the chambets and non-circular jet indicated in the drawing and described herein are desirable and essential to the proper functioning of the invention. Although the invention has been described and disclosed as an aerosol bomb dispensing head, obviously it may be used to dispense pressurized materials in conjunction with other systems.

Although but two embodiments of the invention have been disclosed and described in detail, it is obvious that many changes may be made in the size, shape, detail, and

arrangements of the elements of the invention within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

l. A detachable head for a pressurized container having a valve sealed by the pressure of the container acting on said valve in the outward direction, said head being adapted to actuate said valve and comprising a body of resilient material, a push pin sealingly carried by said body and removable therewith, said pin adapted to be actuated manually to unseat said valve to provide a release opening for the container contents, said body'of resilient material having mounted therein a threaded insert adapted to engage a thread member on the container for retaining the head thereat and pressing the resilient material of the head contacting the container against the same to eifect a seal of the head thereat.

2. A detachable head for a pressurized container having a valve sealed by the pressure of the container acting on said valve in the outward direction, said head being adapted to actuate said valve and comprising a body of resilient material, a push pin sealingly carried by said body and removable therewith, said pin adapted to be actuated manually to unseat said valve to provide a release opening for the container contents, the operative movement of the push pin causing deflection of resilient material in the head at the contacted surfaces of the push pin rather than relative sliding, said push pin being removable from the head by mere outward pulling.

3. A detachable head for a pressurized container having a valve sealed by the pressure of the container'acting on said valve in the outward direction, said head being formed thereon exteriorly of the head and converging toward the head, said conical portion being adapted to contact the head as the push pin is depressed to additionally seal the same at the head.

4. A detachable head for a pressurized container having a valve sealed by the pressure in the container acting on said valve in the outward direction, said head being adapted to actuate said valve and comprising a body of a resilient material; a pushpin sealingly carried by said body and removable therewith, said pin adapted to be actuated manually to unseat said valve to provide a re lease opening for the container contents, said head body having at least one receiving chamber formed therein and communicating with said opening, and a hollow nonresilient element inserted into said body to close said receiving chamber and having a final discharge opening provided therein, said element being removable from the head by mere pulling.

5. A detachable head for a pressurized container having a valve sealed by the pressure in the container acting on said valve in the outward direction, said head being adapted to actuate said valve and comprising a body of a resilient material; a pushpin sealingly carried by said body and removable therewith, said pin adapted to be actuated manually to unseat said valve to provide a release opening for the container contents, said head body having at least one receiving chamber formed therein and communicating with said opening, and a hollow non- V resilient element inserted into said body to close said receiving chamber and having a final discharge opening of non-circular shape provided therein, and means to rotate said element adjustably through a predetermined valve to vary selectively the position of said opening with respect to the container.

6. A detachable head for a pressurized container having a valve sealed by the pressure in the container acting on said valve in the outward direction, said head being adapted to actuate said valve and comprising a body of a resilient material; a pushpin sealingly carried by said body and removable therewith, said pin adapted to be actuated manually to unseat said valve to provide a release opening for the container contents, said head body having at least one receiving chamber formed therein and communicating with said opening, and a hollow nonresilient element inserted into said body to close said receiving chamber and having a final discharge opening of an elongated substantially rectangular shape, and means to turn said element within said body to vary selectively the position of said opening with respect to the container.

7. A discharge head defined in claim 6, said head having two receiving chambers formed within it and intersecting at an obtuse angle to be mutually intercommunicated.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,185,215 Lezzeni May 30, 1916 1,869,049 Card July 26, 1932 1,992,067 Gunn Feb. 19, 1935 2,026,743 Kurtz June 7, 1936 2,529,808 Martin Nov. 14, 1950 2,550,840 Martin et al. May 1, 1951 2,621,973 Lodes Dec. 16, 1952 FOREIGN PATENTS 351,214 Great Britain June 25, 1931

Patent Citations
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US1992067 *Dec 14, 1933Feb 19, 1935Mott Gunn DamonValved closure
US2026743 *Nov 26, 1934Jan 7, 1936Kurtz Clinton JSpray nozzle
US2529808 *Sep 24, 1946Nov 14, 1950Universal Properties IncValve device for pressure fluid containers
US2550840 *Sep 24, 1946May 1, 1951Universal Properties IncValve control for pressure fluid containers
US2621973 *Aug 3, 1949Dec 16, 1952Allied Chem & Dye CorpSpray dispenser
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3089624 *Jun 28, 1956May 14, 1963Leeds & MicallefPressure discharge container
US3178062 *Apr 26, 1960Apr 13, 1965Frank WeltyDispensing apparatus for pre-mixed beverages
US3346195 *Oct 22, 1964Oct 10, 1967Sprayon ProductsAerosol spray device
US3474940 *Jul 25, 1967Oct 28, 1969British Oxygen Co LtdDispensing valves
US6345775May 31, 2000Feb 12, 2002Wilsoart International, Inc.Very high solid content aerosol delivery system
US6433051Feb 3, 2000Aug 13, 2002Wilsonart InternationalVery high solid content aerosol delivery system
US6896205 *Feb 3, 2000May 24, 2005Premark Rwp Holdings, Inc.Very high solid content aerosol delivery system
US20070125879 *Nov 21, 2005Jun 7, 2007Babek KhamenianAdjustable spray nozzle
WO2012080255A3 *Dec 13, 2011Aug 23, 2012L'orealFan-shaped aerosol device for styling the hair
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/337, 222/402.25, 239/572, 222/402.13, 239/601, 251/14, 239/597, D23/224, 239/573
International ClassificationB65D83/14, B65D83/16
Cooperative ClassificationB65D83/14, B65D83/20
European ClassificationB65D83/20, B65D83/14