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Publication numberUS2738017 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 13, 1956
Filing dateAug 18, 1953
Priority dateAug 18, 1953
Publication numberUS 2738017 A, US 2738017A, US-A-2738017, US2738017 A, US2738017A
InventorsJohn Lynes
Original AssigneeOil Recovery Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Packer construction for oil well tools
US 2738017 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 13, 1956 J. LYNES PACKER CONSTRUCTION FOR 011. WELL TOOLS Filed Aug. 18, 1953 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 IF I INVENTOR. John 51726.5, BY

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Mam}! 1956 J. LYNES 2,738,017

PACKER CONSTRUCTION FOR OIL WELL TOOLS Filed Aug. 18, 1953 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Q i 28 if 40 -29 26 V INVENTOR.

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J. LYNES PACKER CONSTRUCTION FOR OIL WELL TOOLS March 13, 1956 Filed Aug. 18, 1955 INVENTOR. jbfin Lynes, BY

United States Patent O 2,738,017 PACKER CONSTRUCTION FOR OIL WELL TOOLS John Lynes, Albuquerque, N. Mex., assignor to Oil Recovery Corporation, Albuquerque, N. Mex.,,a corporation of New Mexico Application August 18, 1953, Serial No. 374,888

7 Claims. (Cl. 166-496) This invention relates to a new and improved packer construction for oil well tools useful in the sealing off of oil bearing formations for the purposes of treating them in order to render them productive, and to recover the oil therefrom.

The present specification covers a tool which, generally speaking, has objects and advantages common to those mentioned in my prior copending application Serial No. 307,958 filed September 5, 1952, entit1ed'Oil Well Tool,

and in my prior copending application Serial No. 341,896

filed March 12, 1953, entitled Oil Well Treating and Production Tool, of which applications this application constitutes a continuation-in-part. The disclosures of said applications are hereby incorporated herein by this reference.

As previously explained, many valuable oil bearing formations are never successfully exploited after their discovery because of the great difiiculty of gaining access to them. According to modern rotary drilling methods a column of drilling fluid or mud is present in the well which presents a formidable barrier to the driller in sealing OE and gaining access to a productive formation which would produce if the proper conditions were present. Many packer tools have been devised to produce conditions favorable to recovery, but these have failed to keep pace with the progress made in drilling deep wells where pressures and temperatures deter the successful operation of such tools and make them short-lived.

Packer tools usually are designed to seal off a formation from the well liquids above and below it, by means of locating expansible members above and below the selected formation. When actuated, these members are intended to enlarge into contact with the bore hole to effect the seals. If this operation is successful, the formation may be relieved of the inhibiting pressures presented by fluid in the bore hole, and the oil induced to flow into ducts contained in the tool between the packers, then to the surface. Preliminarily, treating fluids, such as acids, may be injected into the selected formation to break it down.

Providing a tool which will operate accordingly has proved exceedingly difficult.

A particular object of the present invention relates to No. 307,958 the packer component must comprise a resilient element of rubber or a rubber-substitute, preferably constructed according to my invention. The resilient element must be enlarged with great force against the bore hole walls in order to provide an effective seal. In

so doing the resilient element itself has insuflicient strength to resist rupture, and hence must be confined between other elements. For such elements, I have devised expansible metallic collars of various types. In

2,738,017 Patented Mar. 13, 1956 ice connection with Figs. 15-17 of my application Serial No. 307,958 I show'a collar construction most nearly similar to the present invention, and whereof this invention constitutes a modification and an improvement.

More precise advantages of the invention will be explained hereinafter:

In the drawing:

Fig. 1 shows in'perspective two views of a tool embodying the invention, as they would appear if located in bore holes of oil wells adjacent a formation selected for operations;

Fig. 2 is an elevation with parts in section, of a packer unit'embodying the invention, said unit being in collapsed or inoperative condition; and

Fig. 3 is a view similar to Fig. 2 showing the packer unit in actuated condition.

The device in general consists of one or more packer units, generally used in pairs, coupled one beneath anther in spaced relationship and supported in the bore hole from a string of pipe.

Fig. 1 depicts two bore holes on section. In the left hand bore hole 20 is located the tool as it would appear prior to actuation with upper and lower packer units in collapsed condition. The tool as shown is intended to be operated after the manner described either in my application Serial No. 307,958 or 341,896, the disclosures whereof are incorporated herein by reference. The controlsand related operating means will therefore not be described herein in detail.

lt sufiices to say that the tool in bore hole 20 suspended from supporting pipe 27, is lowered into the well and located opposite a selected formation 22, with the packer units 23 and 24 in collapsed condition, but with the control means in such condition that fluid pressure pumped from the surface will actuate pistons which compress the packers longitudinally (axially of the tool), causing the lateral enlargement of the flexible elements thereof into engagement with the walls of the bore hole.

This condition of actuation is shown in the tool in bore hole 21 of Fig. l, in this position, by vertical shifting of internal pipe 25 relative to the packer units, access to the selected formation may be accomplished by exposing the ports 26 thereto.

. In Figs. 2 and 3, a packer unit 23 according to the invention is shown in enlarged scale, it being understood that the construction of the invention is common to the packer unit 24 of Figure 1. Such a packer unit is suspended from inner pipe 25 which in turn is coupled to supporting pipe 27. The packer unit is shiftable relative to the pipe 25 by means such as shown in my prior ap plications for control purposes which include the shifting a of ports 26, as will be further described.

Each packer unit comprises an upper body member 28 and a lower body member 29 held in spaced relationship on the mandrel 30 externally of pipe 25. The lower body member is formed with an internal recess which constitutes a ring-type cylinder 31 in which is'mounted a ring-type piston 32 having the configuration shown in Figs. 2 and 3. Cylinders 31 are supplied with fluid pressure through internal ducts 33 leading to the external walls of pipe 25. It will thus be seen from a comparison of Figs. 2 and- 3 that when the packer unit is in the Fig. 2 position, ports 26 are in register with ducts 33 and the unit is in condition for fluid pressure to be delivered to cylinder 31 to actuate piston 32. In Fig. 3, however, pipe 25 having been shifted relative to the packer unit, ports 26 have been closed off from ducts 33 leaving the cylinders sealed full of fluid pressure. In the case of packer 23, ports 26 are shifted externally of the tool and may then serve as treating or production ports, as shown in Fig. 3. Safety vents 43 are provided to prevent excessive movement of piston 32 The resilient ram or packer element 34 is composed of a plurality of overlapping plies of material, four being illustrated in Figs. 2 and 3. The upper and lower ends of these plies are bonded together as shown atv 35, 36 as by vulcanization. Preferably between each bonded end, each ply is provided with a longitudinal split seam, such as seam 37, 'Fig. 3, the seams being arranged on alternate sidesper layer, or at least so arranged thatthe seams of adjacent plies will not lie in register. This construction is common to my prior copending application above-identified.

Packer 34 is mounted externally of mandrel 3t) and is attached to the lower internal end of upper body member 28 and to the internal upper end of piston 32 by means of the sleeve screws38 and 39, which make a threaded connection with screw threads formed in the recess 40 of member 38 and the recess 41 of piston 32. Sleeve screws 38;-;and 39 are formed-with upstanding flanges which extend externally of recesses 40 and 41, and are bonded to theends 35 and 36 -of packer 34as by vulcanization.

Withdhe construction so far described, it will be understoodthat when the piston is actuated, the packer 34 may be subjected to powerful compressive action so that it will Wad together in the manner of an accordion and beforced againstthe bore hole walls. During this movement packer 34 will naturally tend to splay out, or to rupture, adjacent its ends unless said ends are confined securely by means which must also be designed to prevent jamming of the tool in the bore hole or injury to the material of which packer 34 is composed.

According to the present invention, the collar construction includes two ring shaped assemblies, each consisting of a pluralityof bearing plates 45, 46 in side-by-side relation, each assembly of plates 45, 46 being peripherally disposed longitudinally over the upper and lower portions,..respectively, of packer 34 in such manner that the packer material beneath is substantially covered by said. bearing plates when the packer is in collapsed condition, as in Fig. 2. Plates 45, 46 are bonded to the resilient material of packer 34, as by vulcanization. Likewise, when the-packer is in non-actuated condition, the plates 45, 46 are located on the packer ends in spaced relationship from the lower end of upper body member I 28 and the upper end of the piston 32 against which they will come to rest when the packer is actuated, as seen in Fig. 3. Also, with the packers non-actuated, it will be seenv that plates 45, 46, slightly overlap on the external side the externally extending portions of the sleeve screws 38 and 39, so that when the packers are actuated, therends of plates 45, 46 will move into the annular space formed between-the sleeve screws 38, 39 and springs '50, 51, into abutment with the body member 28 and piston 32 as aforesaid.

Bearing plates 45, 46 are also formed with hook-shaped noses 47, 48 on their-ends adjacent the center of packer 34,.for:the purpose .of confining and compressing-springs 50,-51 as will befurther described.

Springs 50, 51 are coil-type springs which substantially covenand-overlap the bearing plates 45, 46. The remote ends-of springs 50, 51 are seated on the upper body member. 28 and piston 32 externally of the sleeves 38 and 39, the spring ends adjacent the center of packer 34 are confined in the hook-shaped noses 47, 48 of bearing plates This collar construction takes the position shown in Fig.2 prior to actuation of the packer. As the packer unitisactuated and the packer element 34 commences to expand laterally under pressure delivered by piston 32, hearing plates 45, 46 are forced to fan out laterally, leaving gaps spaced between adjacent plates. It is important that the-overlying coil springs efiiciently serve the function of preventing extrusion of the packer material through these gaps.

Accordingly, in the improved construction, plates 45, 46 are also permitted, by virtue of their spaced relationship to the upper body member and the piston, to travel axially of the tool a predetermined distance away from the point of maximum expansion of packer 34, after which they come into contact and seat upon the upper body member and piston, as seen in Fig. 3. This movement accomplishes several purposes: it avoids any shearing action between the material of packer 34 which is bonded to the plates 45, 46, and it permits springs 50, 51 to be compressed axially as they become uncoiled. While this movement is taking place the inner ply layers of packer 34 beneath the plates are afiorded anincreased waddin'g action. The compression of springs'50, 51 by the'action of the hook-shaped noses 47, 48 enhances the strength of the springs, as the packer is actuated, particularly since the overlapping of the coils will take place to a greater extent in the coils of the springs adjacent the center of the packer, where the most strength is needed to encounter the internal forces in the packer which seek to escape through the collar assemblages.

Finally when the tool has been actuated to its fullest extent, as in Fig. 3, the material of packer 34 will be firmly held in engagement with the bore hole walls, .and supported in this position by the bearing plates Whose hook-shaped noses will contact the bore hole walls, these plates, together with the coil springs providing metallic collars of improved design which will confine and protect the resilient packer material with improved results.

The drawings are not intended to show precise scale. To give an example, however, of a typical packer unit for a five inchwell, the resilient packer element may be nine fect;o,verall and four inches diameter prior to actuation, the bearing plates fifteen inches long, and the piston and cylinder constructed for a five foot maximum'stroke. The coil springs of highly resilient carbon steel may be twenty inches. prior to axial compression by the bearing plates, with a substantial overlap which is increased when the packer is actuated.

What is claimed is:

1. In :a well tool of the type described, a packer unit consisting of a pair of body members held in spaced relationship by a connecting member, said members being adaptedfor suspension in a well by a string of supporting pipe,-one :of said body members containing a piston movablein the direction .of said other body member, a packer member of compressible material connected between said piston and-said other body member, means to actuate said piston to cause longitudinal compression and consequent lateralexpansion of said packer member'into contact .with the walls of a well, and collar means for confining the end portions of said packer memberincluding airing of bearing plates bonded 'to each .end portion at pointsnormally in spaced =relationship to said piston andsaid other-body member, said plates being movable into abutment there with upon compression of said packer, and acoil spring substantially covering each ring of platesand-tensioncd to resist lateralexpansion of said plates.

2. In a Well tool of the type described,a packer unit consisting of a-pair of body members held in spaced relationship by a connecting member, said members being adapted :for suspension in a well by a string .of supporting pipe, one of said body members containing a piston movable ..in the direction of said other body member, a

, packer member of compressible material connected'ibetween .said piston and .said other body member, meansto actuate said piston to cause longitudinal compression and consequent lateral expansion of said packer member. into contact with the walls of a well, and collar means for confining the end portions of said packer member including a ring of bearing plates bonded to each end portion at points normally in spaced relationship to said piston and. said other body member, said plates being-movable into abutment therewithupon compression of said;packer, a :coil spring substantially overing each ring of plates and means carried by said'plates for longitudinally compressi'ng said springs during the movement of said 'plates into abutment with said piston and said other body member.

3. In a well tool of the type described, a packer unit consisting of a pair of body members held in spaced relationship by a connecting member, said members being adapted for suspension in a well by a string of supporting pipe, one of said body members containing a piston movable in the direction of said other body member, a packer member of compressible material connected between said piston and said other body member, means to actuate said piston to cause longitudinal compression and consequent lateral expansion of said packer member into contact with the walls of a well, and collar means for confining the end portions of said packer member including a ring of bearing plates bonded to each end portion at points normally in spaced relationship to said piston and said other body member, said plates being movable into abutment therewith upon compression of said packer, a coil spring substantially covering each ring of plates, and projections carried by said plates on their ends adjacent the center of the packer member for longitudinally compressing said springs against the piston and other body member, respectively, during the movement of said plates into abutment therewith.

4. The invention according to claim 1, said packer member having its ends bonded to sleeve screws connected to said piston and said body member.

5. The invention according to claim 1, said packer memher having its ends bonded to sleeve screws connected to said piston and said body member, said screws being formed with flanges projecting internally of said bearing plates to form guides for said plates when moved into abutment with said piston and said other body member.

6. The invention according to claim 1, wherein the packer member is composed of tubular overlapping plies of compressible material, the respective end of said plies being secured together.

7. The invention according to claim 1, wherein the packer member is composed of tubular overlapping plies of compressible material, the respective ends of said plies being secured together, and open seams formed substantially lengthwise in adjacent plies of said material, the seams in said adjacent plies being located to avoid substantial overlapping.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,549,168 Townsend Aug. 11, 1925 2,082,113 Layne et al. June 1, 1937 2,159,640 Strom May 23, 1939 2,177,601 Smith Oct. 24, 1939 2,178,844 Baker Nov. 7, 1939 2,449,514 Scoville Sept. 14, 1948

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1549168 *Feb 18, 1924Aug 11, 1925Townsend Elvin ESealing device for wells
US2082113 *Dec 3, 1934Jun 1, 1937LayneWell packer
US2159640 *Aug 29, 1938May 23, 1939Strom Carl EDeep well cementing device
US2177601 *Jan 15, 1937Oct 24, 1939George P VerrettCasing packer
US2178844 *Oct 10, 1936Nov 7, 1939Baker Oil Tools IncBridge and cement retainer for well bores
US2449514 *Mar 21, 1946Sep 14, 1948Us Rubber CoOil well packer
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2884070 *Nov 4, 1955Apr 28, 1959Cicero C BrownWell packer
US3419078 *Nov 29, 1965Dec 31, 1968Harbison Fischer Mfg CoPump anchors
US5027894 *May 1, 1990Jul 2, 1991Davis-Lynch, Inc.Through the tubing bridge plug
US5197542 *Mar 31, 1992Mar 30, 1993Davis-Lynch, Inc.Well packer
US5641019 *Dec 1, 1995Jun 24, 1997Bj Services Company, U.S.A.Swab-resistant subterranean well packer
US6935432Sep 20, 2002Aug 30, 2005Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Method and apparatus for forming an annular barrier in a wellbore
US7017670 *Feb 26, 2003Mar 28, 2006Read Well Services LimitedApparatus and method for expanding and fixing a tubular member within another tubular member, a liner or a borehole
US7216706Feb 13, 2004May 15, 2007Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Annular isolators for tubulars in wellbores
US7252142Nov 5, 2004Aug 7, 2007Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Annular isolators for expandable tubulars in wellbores
US7299882Jan 19, 2007Nov 27, 2007Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Annular isolators for expandable tubulars in wellbores
US7320367Jan 19, 2007Jan 22, 2008Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Annular isolators for expandable tubulars in wellbores
US7363986Jan 19, 2007Apr 29, 2008Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Annular isolators for expandable tubulars in wellbores
US7404437Aug 3, 2007Jul 29, 2008Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Annular isolators for expandable tubulars in wellbores
US20040055760 *Sep 20, 2002Mar 25, 2004Nguyen Philip D.Method and apparatus for forming an annular barrier in a wellbore
US20040159445 *Feb 26, 2003Aug 19, 2004Hazel Paul RoderickApparatus and method
US20050023003 *Feb 13, 2004Feb 3, 2005Echols Ralph H.Annular isolators for tubulars in wellbores
US20050092485 *Nov 5, 2004May 5, 2005Brezinski Michael M.Annular isolators for expandable tubulars in wellbores
US20070114016 *Jan 19, 2007May 24, 2007Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Annular Isolators for Expandable Tubulars in Wellbores
US20070114017 *Jan 19, 2007May 24, 2007Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Annular Isolators for Expandable Tubulars in Wellbores
US20070114018 *Jan 19, 2007May 24, 2007Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Annular Isolators for Expandable Tubulars in Wellbores
US20070114044 *Jan 19, 2007May 24, 2007Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Annular Isolators for Expandable Tubulars in Wellbores
US20070267201 *Aug 3, 2007Nov 22, 2007Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Annular Isolators for Expandable Tubulars in Wellbores
US20080251250 *Jun 25, 2008Oct 16, 2008Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Annular Isolators for Expandable Tubulars in Wellbores
USRE41118Oct 30, 2007Feb 16, 2010Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Annular isolators for expandable tubulars in wellbores
WO2004027201A2 *Sep 18, 2003Apr 1, 2004Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Annular isolators for expandable tubulars in wellbores
WO2004027201A3 *Sep 18, 2003Mar 24, 2005Halliburton Energy Serv IncAnnular isolators for expandable tubulars in wellbores
Classifications
U.S. Classification277/340, 166/187, 166/120
International ClassificationE21B33/12, E21B33/128, E21B33/124
Cooperative ClassificationE21B33/124, E21B33/128
European ClassificationE21B33/128, E21B33/124