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Publication numberUS2739130 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 20, 1956
Filing dateJul 9, 1952
Publication numberUS 2739130 A, US 2739130A, US-A-2739130, US2739130 A, US2739130A
InventorsWesley E. Combs
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cleaning composition
US 2739130 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent. O ce I CLEANING COMPOSITION Wesley E. Combs, Okmulgee, Okla.

No Drawing. Application July 9, 1952,

Serial No. 298,009 1 pended claims. Y

, The invention consists in the novel compositions, combinations and improvements herein described. y An object of my invention is to provide a novel cleaning composition comprising anicotine and water mixture, said composition having -surface active and detergent properties as well as lowering the surface tension and interfacial tension between the object being cleaned and foreign matter such as dirt, grease, wax, etc., deposited on said object.

' Patented Mar. .20, 1956 ered, thus facilitating the removal .of the foreign matter from said object.

Advantageously, the above cleaning compositions have incorporated therein blue indigo in the range of about 0.0005 to about 0.50% by weight of the total composition. The addition of the blue indigo increases the cleaning properties of said compositions as well as adding a shine or lustre to the object being cleaned, and at the same time improving the color of said object.

One of the outstanding features of the novel nicotine and water mixture is that the cleaning properties of a detergent, whethernatural or synthetic, are improved by the addition of nicotine to said detergent to improve its cleaning action. Preferably, the nicotine is added to the detergent in the form of a nicotine and water mixture, as defined above. If so desired, however, the nicotine may be added byitself. in either case, the detergent composition is diluted with water before it is used in cleaning. Among the. natural detergents which may be improved, are organic alkali metal soaps derived from the saponification of higher fatty acids by sodium and potassium hydroxide such as the soaps prepared by the saponification of tallow, palm oil, cocoanut oil and cottonseed oil with organic detergentsmay be illustrated by soda ash, potash and caustics such as sodium hydroxide and potassium hydroxide.

,Another object of my invention is to provide a;.novel cleaning composition comprising nicotine,' water and blue indigo, said compositon not only having improved detergent and surface active properties, but also having the property of improving the lustre and color of the ob ject being cleaned. i

A still further object of my invention is to provide an improved detergent composition comprising a detergent tine in at least about .007% by weight of the total com position, provides a cleaning composition having unique surface active and detergent properties. ness of this composition increases with the increase of nicotine up to Where the nicotine is about 33% by weight of the total composition. Cleaning compositions in the above ranges are highly desirable, for at those ranges the nicotine will volatilize into the air after application to the object to be cleaned, thus preventing the depositing of any foreign matter from the cleaning composition on the The effeotive-' obiect cleaned. Above the upper limit range of 33%, i

=Any suitable syntheticdetergent composition may be used, such as the alkali salts of alkyl aryl sulfonates and ..su1fated alcohols, polyoxya-lkylene ethers and their derivatives. Specific examplesof typical-syntheticdetergent compositions which may be improved bythe addition of nicotine are as follows, the per cents being expressed by weights? u i (1) Sodium ethyl methyloleylamide sulfonate, 30%; sodium sulfate, 64%; sodium carbonate, 0.9%; sodium chloride, 4.6%; water, 0.5%.

(2) Sodium laury sulfate, 38.8%; sodium carbonate, 1.3%; sodium sulfate, 57.8%; water, 2.1%.

(3) Sodium alkyl aryl sulfonate, 33.4%; sodium carbonate, 1.6%; sodium sulfate, 62.6%; water, 2.4%.

(4) Sodium sulfated monoglyceride, 32%; sodium carbonate, 1.3%; sodium sulfate, 64.7%; water, 2.0%.

(5) Keryl benzene sodium sulfonate, 40%; sodium sulfate, 24%; sodium carbonate, 4.8%; trisodium phos phate, 9%; sodium silicate, 10%; sodium carboxy methyl cellulose, 0.5%; water, 11.7%.

(6) Alkyl aryl sodium sulfonate, 37%; sodium sulfate, 9% magnesium sulfate, 5%; disodium phosphate, 4%; sodium pyrophosphate, 33%; sodium trypoly phosphate, 3%; sodium carboxy methyl cellulose, 0.7%; water, 8.3%.

(7) Sodium salt sulfated alcohols, 20%; sodium sulfate, 15%; sodium carbonate, 1.4%; sodium chloride, 0.5%; disodium phosphate, 6.7%; sodium pyrophosphate, 14.6%; sodium tripoly phosphate, 27.8%; sodium carboxy methyl cellulose, 0.5%; sodium silicate, 3.8%; water, 9.7%.

(8) Polyoxyethylene ether, 20%; sodium carbonate,

21%; sodium pyrophosphate, 39%; starch, 15 water,

(9) Alkyl aryl sodium sulfonate, 25 sodium sulfate, 17%; sodium carbonate, 1%; disodiu'maphosphate, 2.2%; sodium tripoly phosphate, 7.5%; sodium silicate, 4.5%;

sodium carboxy methyl cellulose, 0.4%; sodium -pyro (12) Polyoxyalkylene ether of partial palmitic acid ester.

(13) Modified alkyl aryl sodium sulfonate.

(14) Sodium salt of technical lauryl sulfate.

Whether the nicotine be added by itself to the detergent or in the form of a water and nicotine mixture, the detergent should contain at least .0000042 parts nicotine to one part of detergent. The maximum nicotine preferred is about .5 part of nicotine to 1 part of detergent. Hence, if the nicotine is added in the form of a nicotine and water mixture, the nicotine and water mixture, wherein the nicotine is in the range of 0.0007% to 33% by weight of the total mixture, is added to the detergent in the ratio of about .06 to 1.5 parts by weight of said mixture to about 1 part by weight of the detergent. If so desired, blue indigo may be added in the range of about .000000003 to about'.0075 part per part of detergent. If a nicotine and water mixture is used, the range would be about .0005% to about .5 blue indigo of the total nicotine and water mixture.

In either case, the detergent containing nicotine, whether added by itself or in the form of a nicotine and water mixture, is diluted with from zero to 4 gallons of water (15,140) for every gram of detergent in said composition.

in order to describe the invention more specifically, the following working examples are now given.

Example I Example 11 Fifteen grams of nicotine are added to eighty grams of water and mixed thoroughly.

A strip of leather having deposited thereon dirt, wax and other foreign matter is cleaned by depositing 3 grams of said above mixture on said strip and rubbing said mixture on said strip, thus removing the foreign matter from said strip, said mixture in no way interfering with the quality of the leather strip.

Example III One-thousandth of a gram of blue indigo is added to a nicotine and water mixture prepared under the conditions stated in the first paragraph of Example 11.

A sheet of iron having a chrome finish and having dcposited thereon dirt, grease, wax and other foreign matter is cleaned by depositing 3 grams of said above mixture on said sheet and rubbing said mixture on said sheet. By this application, the foreign matter is not only removed from said sheet, but also the chrome is provided with a bright shine or lustre.

Example IV Ten grams of a nicotine and water mixture prepared under the conditions of the first paragraph of Example II are mixed with ten grams of sodium tallow soap. This mixture is then diluted with one gallon of water.

A strip of woodwork having a maple finish and having deposited thereon dirt, oil and other foreign matter is cleaned by depositing 15 grams of said above mixture on said strip and rubbing said mixture on said strip, whereby the foreign matter on said strip is removed therefrom, resulting in the strip having a new-like appearance.

A second strip, substantially the same as the first, is then cleaned by applying 15 grams of a sodium tallow soap and water mixture, prepared by adding ten grams of said soap to one gallon of water, and rubbing said mixture on said strip. Although some of the foreign matter is removed by said application, it is not as effective a cleaning composition as the soap, nicotine and water mixture. The first strip has a much cleaner and newer appearance than the secondly cleaned strip, thus showing the superiority of the first described cleaning composition.

Example V l5 gram of a nicotine and water mixture prepared under the conditions of the first paragraph of Example II is mixed with ten grams of a synthetic detergent consisting by weight of 30% sodium ethyl methloleylamide sulfonate, 64% sodium sulfate, 0.9% sodium carbonate and 4.6% of sodium chloride. This mixture is then diluted with one gallon of water.

A sheet of white cotton fabric having deposited thereon dirt, grease and other foreign matter is cleaned by depositing grams of said above mixture on said fabric sheet and rubbing said mixture on said sheet, whereby all of the foreign matter on said strip is removed efficiently.

A second sheet of cotton fabric, substantially the same as the first, is then cleaned by applying 100 grams of water and detergent mixture, prepared by adding ten grams of a detergent, having the same chemical make as the detergent defined above, to one gallon of water, and rubbing said mixture on said sheet. This mixture does not remove the foreign matter as adequately as the cleaning composition containing the nicotine and water mixture in addition to the detergent, thus indicating the superiority of the latter cleaning composition over the former.

Example VI To a cleaning composition, prepared in accordance with the nicotine, water and tallow soap mixture of Example IV, is added one-thousandth of a gram ofblue indigo.

A sheet of chrome metal having deposited thereon dirt, grease and other foreign matter is cleaned by depositing 5 grams of said above mixture on said sheet and rubbing said mixture on said sheet, whereby the foreign matter is removed from said sheet. The chrome metal has a bright lustre simulating that of a brand new chrome metal sheet.

Example V11 To a cleaning composition, prepared in accordance with the nicotine, water and detergent mixture of Example V, is added one-thousandth of a gram of blue indigo.

A sheet of stainless steel having deposited thereon dirt, grease and other foreign matter is cleaned by depositing 5 grams of said above mixture on said sheet and rubbing said mixture on said sheet, whereby the foreign matter is removed from said sheet. As in the previous example, the stainless steel sheet has a bright lustre simulating that of a brand new stainless steel sheet.

Accordingly, the cleaning compositions of the present invention are most useful and efficient. The fact that they can be used on all types of objects without impairing their physical properties makes them highly advantageous to use.

Although the nicotine and water mixtures are highly desirable cleaning compositions, the incorporation of blue indigo to such compositions is recommended, for not only is the cleaning action of'such compositions improved, but the object being cleaned is provided with a bright lustre and the color of the object is improved.

A most remarkable discovery is that the cleaning action of the conventional natural and synthetic detergents is improved by the incorporation of nicotine with the detergent, either by adding a nicotine and water mixture to the detergent, or adding the nicotine directly to the detergent. In either case, the new detergent compositions are further diluted by adding water when used in cleaning.

The invention in its broader aspects is not limited to the specific process described but departures may be made therefrom, within the scope of the accompanying claims, without departing from the principles of the invention and without sacrificing its chief advantages.

What is claimed is:

1. A process for cleaning an object containing foreign matter deposited thereon comprising depositing on said object a composition consisting essentially of water and nicotine, the nicotine being in the range of about .007% to about 33% by weight of the total composition, and rubbing said composition on said object, whereby the foreign matter on said object is loosened and removed from said object 2. A process as defined in claim 1 wherein said composition contains blue indigo in the range of about 0.0005% to about 0.5% of the total composition.

Condensed Chemical Dictionary, Reinhold Pub. 00., N. Y. (1942), page 464.

Modern Soap and Detergent Industry, Martin; Crosby Lockwood and Son, London (1931), vol. 2, sec. 2, p. 33.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1795676 *Mar 24, 1930Mar 10, 1931Raisch CinderellaSilver cleaning and polishing composition
US1906484 *Mar 26, 1931May 2, 1933Ig Farbenindustrie AgSoap preparation
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3058916 *Jun 19, 1957Oct 16, 1962Henkel & Cie GmbhColored cleaning agents
US4879105 *Mar 18, 1988Nov 7, 1989Kao CorporationWeakly acidic bath agents
Classifications
U.S. Classification134/34, 510/181, 510/405, 510/337, 125/11.13, 510/500, 510/254, 134/40, 510/242, 134/39, 510/275, 510/245
Cooperative ClassificationB08B3/02