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Publication numberUS2742005 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 17, 1956
Filing dateMay 11, 1953
Priority dateMay 11, 1953
Publication numberUS 2742005 A, US 2742005A, US-A-2742005, US2742005 A, US2742005A
InventorsEdward Quinn
Original AssigneeUnited Shoe Machinery Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Slip-lasted shoe sewing machines
US 2742005 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 17, 1956 E. QUINN Filed May 11, 1953 7 Sheets-Sheet 1 O I F I 7% 0 73 0,457

e a Z .37 351 5% 47 J5 Invenfor Edward Quinn April 17, 1956 E QUlNN SLIP-LASTED SHOE SEWING MACHINES '7 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed May 11, 1955 Invenfor Edward Quinn,

April 17, 1956 Filed May 11. 1953 E. QUINN SLIP-LASTED SHOE SEWING MACHINES 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 In venfor Edward Quinn p :0! o ize xii? 9 April 17, 1956 QUINN 2,742,005

SLIP-LASTED SHOE SEWING MACHINES Filed May 11, 1955 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 April 17, 1956 E. QUINN 2,742,005

SLIP-LASTED SHOE SEWING MACHINES Filed May 11, 1955 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 Inventor Edward Quinn April 17, 1956 E. QUINN 2,742,005

SLIP-LASTED SHOE SEWING MACHINES Filed May 11, 1953 7 Sheets-Sheet '7 United States Patent O 2,742,005 SLI P-LASTED SHOE SEWING MACHINES Edward Quinn, Saugus, Mass, assignor to United Shoe Machinery Corporation, Flemington, N. 1., a corporation of New Jersey Application May 11, 1953, Serial No. 353,997 13 Claims. (Cl. 112--36) United States Letters Patent No. 2,695,579, granted November 30, 1954, on an application filed in the name of Ralph E. Pearsall.

The usual practice in the manufacture of a slip-lasted shoe includes the provision of a flat blank upper cut with an accurate pattern designed to form a shoe when its edges are brought into register with those of an unchanneled blank of relatively thin flexible woven sheet material shaped to correspond with the sole of the shoe. in bringing theedges of the parts into register some force is required to overcome the resistance offered by' the material operated upon against deforming it from its, natural fiat condition. Considerable force and skill are required in sewing together the shoe-parts while operating along the abrupt curvature at the toe of a shoe. v Great. difficulty often is encountered in sewing the inside shank porlion of a high-arch womans shoe.

, A desirable type of lock stitch sewing machine for use in the manufacture of slip lasted shoes is a commercially available straight needle machine having a vertical work supporting post. The post has mounted at its upper end a shuttle rotating about an axis at right angles to the'work supporting surface on the post, the lock stitch form of seam being necessary to reduce the bulk of exposed thread in a seam to a minimum, especially when a platform cover or wrapper strip or its equivalent enter into the construction.

An important advantage of a vertical post type lock stitch machine is in the arrangement of the shuttle, the work supporting and clamping members on the post. The post also provides at its left side a vertical clearance drop of a depth greater than the side height of a shoe upper :so that no interference is met during angular positioning movements of the deformed shoe parts. .Such clearance drop is essential where accurate register of the shoe parts is necessary andwhere a relative elongation or compression along the edges of theparts is to be avoided.

For convenience in manufacture, and for facility in exact adjustment of the parts about the operating point in a post typelock stitch sewing machineflhe post is constructed in two parts in the form of brackets independently mounted on a fiat bed portion of a main machine frame. One bracket provides means for mounting bearand the other bracket provides mounting means for a work supporting and clamping surface and for a four motion feed dog having a close fitting eye through which the needle passes after penetrating the work, the eye providing an accurate guide for the needle beneath thework. The needle itself is supported for reciprocation in an overhanging arm forrn'ing apart of the main machine frame. The length of the arm and the accuracy required in lining ings for the shuttle and fora thread case actuating ringer 2,742,005 ted p 1 7 .56

ice

2 up the needle with the guide eye in the feed dog necessitates, for machine assembly purposes, a conveniently adjustable connection between the work support bracket and the main frame. The shuttle bracket also is adjustable .on the main frame, independently of the work support bracket to enable positioning the beak of the shuttle where it will enter with certainty into each loop of thread carried through the work by the needle, the shuttle beak passing as close as possible to the needle in entering each loop of needle thread.

V For preventing release of the shoe parts in the machine during sewing, and for assisting the feed, this type of machine as constructed without the Pearsall invention is provided with two alternately acting work clamps.

The work clamps comprise the work support and a nonfeeding presser foot on the one hand and the feed dog and a feeding presser foot on the other hand. The ordinary arrangements of these clamps are such that the nonfeeding one engages the work along the left side of the sewing point while the feeding one engages the work at a location immediately surrounding the sewing point. The prior stationary nonfeeding work clamp engages such a span of clamped work surface along the work support lengthwise of the line of the seam and such a projection transversely of the seam line that effective shoe sewing operations are rendered difficult.

To reduce the lengthwise span of the work clamps or the transverse projection, the illustrated machine isconstructed with a stationary nonfeeding work clamp having its work engaging surfaces limited with respect to the direction of feed to a gripping area on the work in ad-.

extending beyond the sewing point or projecting trans-- versely of it to the left as heretofore. Even with this limitation of clamping area in advance only of the sewing point a sharply curved section of a shoe engaged by work supporting surface on a post type machine still has too short a radius of curvature'for easy natural feeding and positioning movements required for effectively sewing a high-arch slip-lasted shoe. Also, the force required to deform the material operated upon from its natural fiat condition is so great that even the reduced span of gripping area along the work support is insufiicient to prevent elongation and relative contraction between the parts of a shoe in advance of the sewing point, so that the parts still remain excessively stressed with relation to each other while being sewn together and, accordingly, are distorted in certain sections along their edges after sewing. While distorted sections frequently can be smoothed by hot ironing and pressure the incidence of crippled shoes and the requirements for repairing crippled shoes from this cause have always resulted in serious losses tothe manufacturers of such shoes. I p

The difficulties above noted are greatly increased where an attempt is made to sew a slip-lasted shoe upper to a sock lining in a high-arch shoewith a platform sole attached to the sock lining before the sewing operation is started. In this circumstance the platform sole is used as a guide for shaping both the seam and the resulting shoe but its added stiffness increases the resistance offered by the sock lining against deformation from its natural flat condition to such an extent that no sewing machine heretofore constructed has been demonstrated as being capable of sewing such shoe satisfactorily and with uniformly acceptable results.

The objects of the present invention are to provide a shoe-sewing machine of the double clamp and feed type referred to, on which a high-arch slip-lasted shoe may be sewed with more eifective and uniform. results and with less effort and skill on the part of the operator than has been required heretofore.

Another object of the invention is to provide a post type -machinefor sewing theaparts of a high-arch sliplasted shoe in whicha platform sole-is attached to a sock-lining before sewing, with the use of which machine the incidence of cripples and shoe repair requiremerits are negligible. A still further object. is to provide a' shoe sewing machine of the type referred to which is more readily adjustable for thepurposes intended and more durable in use than prior machines of the same type.

The illustrated embodiment of the present invention comprises a post type, straight needle, lock stitch sewing machine for uniting the registering edges of a shoe upper and a sole member unsupported on a last, which machine overcomes all the objections and ditiiculties enumerated above, particularly in the provision of a horizontal'wo rk gripping abutment at the upper end of its work supporting post, comprising one member in one of apair of clamps, the abutment having a horizontal portion engaging the sewed section of the work beyond the needle and being formed with a work engaging span along the seam line beyond the needle of less'than one- .quarter of an inch and with anabrupt drop of a depth greater than the side height of the shoe upper operated upon at the end of the span beyond the needle to clear the downwardly curving sections of the shoe parts in order that the shoe parts being operated upon may flex away from each other readily with an angular formation :during sewing, the parts hinging about the sewed portion of the seam. With this feature of the invention the abutment has ashoe-engaging projection extending transversely of the seam line a distance of less than onee'ighth of an inch. As illustrated the abutment surface his a' total length of work engaging span, both in advance of and beyond the sewingpoint of the needle of l'essthan' one-half of an inch so that the smallest radius of curvature through'which the edges of the parts are l-ie'ntrnay be readily accommodated in the smallest size ofshoe to be made with a high arch.

The reduction in shoe engaging span and of transverse projection of the work supporting post is accomplished,

"in accordance with the invention, by changing the con- "struction in a unique'manner at the upper end of the "work supporting and clamping bracketwhile retaining the shuttle mounting bracket without modification, thus "preservingall of the essential adjustment requirements in the machine so that'effective' sewingoperations may bep'erformed while the structural design-of'the machine remains in compliance with mass production and manufacturing requirements.

These' a'nd other'features 'of'the invent-ion,-as hereinafter described and claimed, will readily be apparent from the followingdetailed specification taken-in connection while the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. l is a view in left side elevation, partly in section, with a front cover removed, of a post type shoe sewing machine embodying features of the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a view in front'elevation of portions of the overhanging arm and bed plate on the work supporting post of the machine shown in Fig. l, certain parts being shown insection;

Fig. 3 is a view in left side elevation on an enlarged scale of the post and other work engaging members in v the machine, parts of a shoe being shown in section at operating position;

Fig. 4 is a view in front elevation of the same membersbroken away and shown in section to disclose the underlying construction;

Fig; 5' is a plan view of'the work supporting post with the shuttle cover removed;

Fig. 6 is a separated view in left side elevation of the work supporting bracket and end'covers for-the post;

Fig. 7' is a plan'vi'ew of the worksupporting bracket in'the post;

Fig. 8 is a detail view in front elevation of the upper portion of the work supportingbracket shown"inFig.'"7;

Fig. 9 is a detail view in left side elevation of a V shaped frame employed on the work supporting bracket;

Fig. 10 is a sectional detail view taken along the line XX of Fig. 6 showing the arrangement of the work supporting V-frame and-the= feed dog;

Fig. 11 is-a detail view at the toe portion ofa shoe on which the machine is intended to operate;

Fig. 12 is an enlargedadetail view, partly=in:stion, showing the mannerofoperation whileguidiug. the shoe whose toe is illustrated in Fig. 11;

Fig. 13 is a sectional plan view taken. along the line XIII-XIII of Fig. 3;

Fig. 14 is a sectional detailview. taken along the line XiVXIV of Fig. 4;

Fig. 15 is a further sectional detail view in right side elevation of an edge gage, as seen from the line XV XV of-Fig. 14;

.Fig. 16 is'a view; in right side elevation ofthe lower portion of, a modifie'd'formof adjustable work clamping presser foot;

"Fig. l7-is a'sectional detail view as seen from the line XVII-XVII of Fig. 16;

Fig. 18 is a detail view in'front elevation of the adjustible work clampingpresser foot;

Fig. 19 is a plan view on. an enlarged scale of the adjustable work clamping presser'foot;

Fig. 20 is a'perspective view of the parts surrounding the sewing point in a, machine having a conventional work supportpost and work feeding andgripping clamps modified in accordance withthePearsall invention;

Fig. 21 is a perspective. view on a somewhat reduced scale showing a'right shoe being operated upon in the Pearsall machine;

Fig. 22 is a perspective view of'the same machine indieating a difficulty encountered while sewing along -the shank 'of a right high-arch shoe;

Fig. 23 is a further perspective view looking fromthe right side 'of' the sewing point showing'the cause ofthe difliculty indicatedin Fig. 22;

Fig. 24 is a sectional view of'a completely sewn light shoe onthe machine having a conventional worksupporting post shown in Figs. 20 to 23 inclusive, the'shoe being illustrated in section passing through the shank of the shoe and viewed in the direction of the toe;

Fig. 25 is a view of the same right shoe after a last has been inserted;

Fig. 26 is a perspective view of the machine parts illustrated in Fig. 20 showing the manner of operation on a left high-arch shoe;

Fig. 27 is a sectional detail view, partly broken away, of the left shoe shown in Fig. 26 as viewed from the line XXVIIXXVII;

Fig. 28 is a perspective view of-the upperend oftthe present improved work support, post corresponding in angular position to that of the conventional post of Fig. 20, together with work'clamps similar to those of the Pearsall invention;

Fig. 29 is a perspective view looking fromtheleft of the sewing point in the machine of the present invention while operating upon theshankof a right high-arch shoe;

Fig. 30 is asectionaldetail view of the right shoe shown 7 in Fig. 29 taken along aline, running across the shank of 1 the manner of operationon a left higharch shoe.

The apparatus illustrated-in thedrawings is a, straight needle lock stitch sewing machine with eye-pointed needle.

, double clamp and feed and a post .type. work support adapted for-operation upon-the,ma Tg LP of a slip-lasted shoe composed of .fleXible material. cut to a carefully designed pattern inrfiat blank-form to provide a configuration of-a shoe when the edges of the blank parts are brought into registering relationship. During operation of the machine the edges of the parts are manipulated by the operator progressively just in advance of'the sewing point to bring them into register for progressive permanent attachment. The machine is characterized by an unusual ease with which shoe parts are manipulated during sewing with better results than those obtainable with prior machines. While operating upon the edges of the parts in a conventional form of slip-lasted shoe, the machine demonstrates its advantages, and more particularly, while sewing the type of shoe identified in Fig. 12 of United States Letters Patent No. 2,425,420, granted August 12, 1947, and in No. 2,546,152, granted March 27, 1951, upon application of J. D. Chandler.

The shoe disclosed in Patent No. 2,546,152 is of the type in which a sock lining has attached to it a pre-cut platform sole of smaller size than the sock lining and the upper is secured to the sock lining by a seam running along outside the edge of the platform sole and passing through the sock lining and upper only, without including the platform sole in the seam. This type of shoe construction is desirable because it enables the edge of the platform sole to be employed as a guiding surface for the seam. The platform sole being relatively stiff, serves in maintaining the resulting shoe in accurate conformity with the outline of the soleand avoids the necessity of a subsequent operation for individually fitting the platform sole to an irregular outline of a seam connecting the upperto the sock lining.

I The configuration of the Chandler shoe is to a large degree determined with respect to its uniformity in contour audappearance, upon the manner of guiding and positioning the parts during theprocessof sewing their.

edges together. For producing the best results the parts of the shoe are strained during the sewing operatiodto introduce into each part a stress equal to that introduced into the other part and in so doing the shoe must be twisted and deformed as the operation progresses, par-.

ticularly along those sections of the shoe beyond the sewing point which are secured together by the completed stitches of the seam. In advance of the sewing point, the parts being still disconnected, the twisting and deforming movements need not be so pronounced. If the-strain in theshoe upper is greater than that in the sock lining, excessive deformation is evidenced by localized wrinkles. These wrinkles require special treatment to remove, and frequently result in second grade or crippled shoes. In many instances wrinkles may be removed by heat and pressure but in so doing there is danger of weakening the construction to an extent such that difficulties are met during subsequent manufacturing operations and'the durability of the completed shoe may seriously be impaired.

Proper twisting 'and deforrning movements of a sliplasted shoe during sewing operations is particularly important when operating upon high-arch shoes having abrupt lengthwise curvatures along their edges, it being necessary to provide sufiicientclearances about the operating point of the machine for movements'of the curved edges. The machine of the Pearsall patent provides an improved construction for sewing slip-lasted shoes with a lock stitch seam by reducing the clamped section along a seam connecting the edges of shoe parts beyond the sewing point. The benefit obtained in the Pearsallmachine is most pronounced along the toe portion of a shoe where the greatest curvatures of the edges occur. With a high-arch shoe having curvatures of short radius along their inside substantially stiffer than the upper so that a greater amount of force must be applied to the upper than to the platform sole during the sewing operation. Accordingly, the shoe is not presented to the machine with the upper projecting upwardly from the work support, as illustrated in the Pearsall patent where the sock lining is not reinforced by a platform sole, but the shoe during the illustrated sewing operation projects with the major portion of its upper extending downwardly from the level of the work support, this being the natural relationship of the shoe parts while being brought into register in the machine. For this reason the work clamps below as well as those above the work must have a limited span in the direction of work feed.

Referring more particularly to Fig. 20' of the drawings, the parts surrounding the sewing point and corresponding to those of the Pearsall machine are illustrated as including an eye-pointed needle 2, a stationary work support plate 4, forming one member of a nonfeeding clamp and being secured to a work support bracket 6, a nonfeeding presser foot 8 forming the other member of the nonfeeding clamp and engaging the Work support plate 4 alongthe line of feed in advance of the sewing point and a work feeding presser foot 10 forming a member of a feed clamp and acting to grip the work against a feed dog 12 moving in unison therewith and extending through a slot in the work support plate. The gripping and feeding clamps are located to engage the work serially along the margin of the sock lining. While such an arrangement of work gripping and feeding clamps is desirable in operating upon a relatively flexible sock lining with no platform sole attached, the span of the work support plate I on the work support, thus forcing the upperof the shoe to assume most of the deformation required-in bring ing the edges of the parts into register below the level of the work support.

When an attempt is made to sew a high-arch sliplasted shoe for a right foot having an upper 14, a sock lining l6, and a pro-cut platform sole 18 attached to the sock lining on the Pearsall machine, the parts assume the positionsillustrated in Fig. 21, the broken outline indicating the fiat position of the platform sole and the full outline of the sole indicating its partially deformed position just before the sewing operations reach the inside curvature of the shank. When thissewing position is reached, it is apparent that the edge of the upper 14 in advance of the needle diverges substantially from the line of the sock lining. As the sewing progresses, the edge of the upper is brought into register with the edge of the sock lining, the platform sole 18 being cut with a slightly smaller size than the sock lining so as to provide a sewing margin not over one-eighth of an inch in width. As the edges are brought into register substantial deformation occurs and when the greatest curvature isreached on the inside of the shank, as indicated in Figl22, the greatest resistance to deformation is oifered,

thespan of the work support plate 4 preventing the parts from assuming their. proper curvatures. As a result, the edges of the parts are excessively stressed; and distorted,

the sewing operation securing their edges together in a progressively distorted relationship. Fig. 22 shows the to cause partial separation from the sock lining. Also,

the distortion wrinkles are permanently retained by the stitches.

The shoe resulting from such sewing operation is illusytrated in Fig. 24 with a gaping relationship betweenlthe :sock rlining rand :;the platform ssole readily apparent. ;-:When:. a lastrMgshown-irr Fig; is .iuserted in the shoe theiwrinldesgn are igreatlytextended upwardly; from-:the .socksliningxto-prevent a' close -fit with the last. -,So-me success has been iobtainedwin removing :these wrinkles :flll'Ollgh; hot ironing or. steamingsbut, CQGF-tSgiO repair :them are not always successful and these efforts always increase, the time and expenseof shoe manufacture.

In sewing ashoeforthe left-foot-azditferent formof -difiieulty arises. ;.In.a left shoe it is the practice-to sew the insideof.thctarch first, theparts otherwise being presented inthe same manner to the sewingmachine.

Referring to Fig.26 when thezsewing operation reaches the .inside ofthe left shoe illustrated, sufiicient distortion oftheparts occurs-to separate the socklining indicated ,at25, partially from the attached platform sole 26. forming. a wrinkle 27 in thesoek lining defining the separated portion. The upper of the left shoe thus sewn is indicated at 28. .As the sewing operation continues to corn pletiontheparts are otherwise brought into shape, little or-no difficulty being experienced with theseam along {the outside of the. shank where. less curvature occurs. .The outside appearance of the separatedportions of the sock lining and platform sole is shown in Fig. 27. For the-reason that the parts aresewn in this relationship permanent distortion results in the completed shoe, necessitating more or less adjustment or repair before subsequent operations.

The work support post of the machine embodying the present invention has the gripping area of its worken- 1 gaging and clamping surfaces limited along the margins of theparts operated upon to permit sewing a high-arch :shoe having a platform sole 29 (see Figs. 29, 30 and 31) attached to its sock lining 30in such a way that the stresses are equally. distributed throughout the registering edges without impartingexcessive loealdistortiomeither inlthesock lining or itsupper 31 during sewing, particularly along the inside shoe shank. .The machine also is equipped with all of the devices and clearance spaces needed for close margin slip-lasted shoe sewing with a lock stitch seam including a shuttle, two alternatelyacting work clamps engaging and gripping the edges of the shoe parts serially along the line of a seam being inserted @to grip and feedthe parts, and forthis purposethe upper end of the work support post is cut away to provide av stationary abutment of restricted surfacearea comprising one member of one of the clamps with a horizontal surface engagingthe sewed section of the shoe parts formed with a span along the seam line beyond the needle of less thancne-quarter of an inch and with an abrupt I dropof a .depthgreater than the side height of the shoe upper at the endof the span beyond the needle to clear downwardly curving sections of the. shoe parts. F or purposes of illustration the angle, from the-horizontal for ;,the abrupt drop isshown to be substantially greater than 45 and preferably approaches 90. By this cut-away construction adownwardly curving section of the shoe upper'ifl is enabled to assume its natural shape while sewing along the inside shankof the shoe, as best shown in Figs. 3 and 29. It has-been found in practice that a. span beyond the needle of greater than one-quarter of an inch in this direction obstructs. the proper curvature .of the parts, especiallywithfeeding and nonfeeding al- .ternately acting work clamps arranged serially along the line.0f a seam being-inserted.

A further restriction in the area of the work engaged by the work clamps also is highly desirable. Since the sock lining 30 seldomprojects beyond the platform sole more than one-eighth of an inch, the shoe gripping abutment attire-upper end of the post is formed with a shoe engag- .ing projection extending transversely of the seam line a distance of less than .one;cighth of,an inch beyond the point of needle operation and also with an abrupt drop to clear downwardly. euryingsectionsgofthe upper as it separates with; an; angular deflection from the sock lining and corresponding damage to the resultingshoe. ;With

.a relatively. narrow sewing margin of .one-eighth of an mm between the edge ofthe sock lining and the platform sole, it .is essential for the grip of the .work clamps to extend at eitherside ofithe. seamline. "The benefits and advantages of a .work. engaging abutment formed. with. a restricted work. engagingisurface .both along the seam .lineand transversely thereof areobtained' in the illustrated lock. stitch .post type sewing machine .by aiunique construction readily applicable to existing doubleclamp and feed machines without detracting from other requirements of adiustabilityand alinementofthe machine frame structure.

The work support post of 'theillustrated machine is constructed in a known manner with two vertical brackets 32 and 39 mounted-for individual. adjustment in parallel side-by-side relation on the fiat bed portion 37 of the main machine frame. In accordance'with the-usual construction, the work support bracket32 is slidable adjustably in a rectangulargroove 34 extending transversely to the seam line and is secured in fixed position along thegroove by screws 35 extending through enlarged counterbored openings inthe bed portion 37 and into threaded engagement with the bracket 32 and an angle plate36 bolted to the vertical side of the bracket. When the screws 35 are loosened, the bracket-32 may be moved to bring the needle into the desired relationship withthe work clamps and with the transverse projection of the abutment secured to the upper end of .the bracket 32. The shuttle bracket 39 is mounted for similar attachment inthe rectangular groove'34 and is secured in adjusted position by a pair of clamp screws 38; passing through counterbored openings in the bed plate and into threaded engagement with a horizontal flanged portion of the bracket.

As in thesPearsall machine the work is gripped alternately first by a nonfeeding clamp and then by a feeding clamp arranged .to engage the sock lining and upper serially along the seam line. The feeding clamp comprises a feed dog 40 mounted in the bracket 32 and secured to the upper end ofa vertical lever-42, a central slot in which is engaged by a block44 pivotally mounted on a screw stud 46 threaded into the bracket 32 (see Figs. 1 and 6). The lower end of the feed lever 42 is pivotally connected with. a feed bar 47 having secured to it an actuating,.yoke4S, the yoke portion of which surrounds an eccentric 5t) driven in unison with the operation of the stitch-forming devices and a horizontal arm of which is connected to an armof a lever 52 including as the work support and feed dog .bracket32 but ,is entirely separate from it and carries bearings 53 (Fig. 4) for a vertical shuttle supporting shaft to the upper end of which the shuttle, indicated at 62, is made fast. T he shuttle 62 has a beak 64, the path of which must be brought into intersection with-the thread carried by the necdleZ while the needle engages the work. Also the upper bearing 58 hasthreaded into it a screwstud 65 passn l y t r u t ea a ing fin 65 actuatedin 'timedjrelation with the rot-atipn pfthe shuttle to engage and disengage a thread case 68;;mounted-for 1 ela i e rotation inz h eshu t invention is applied to the upper ends of a pair of spaced vertical arms on the bracket 32 which are cut off shorter at their upper ends than the shuttle bracket to receive the abutment (see Figs. 6 and 8). The abutment is constructed as a V-shaped member 70 having its smaller end uppermost provided with a feed dog receiving slot 72 (Fig. 7) and with inclined sides'forming abrupt drops surrounding the feed dog 40. Between the lowerends of the inclined sides of the abutment is a strut portion 73 connecting perforated enlarged lower ends of the abutment for receiving a pair of clamp screws 74 entering into threaded relation with the upper ends of the vertical arms on the bracket 32. The rearmost vertical arm of the bracket 32 is not entirely cut away but includes a vertically projecting spindle 76 (see Fig. 6) for a purpose to be described. i

The shuttle. supporting bracket 39 has a shuttle enclosing portion at its upper end of the same dimension horizontally in the direction of the seam as the feed dog supporting bracket 32. In order to provide increased clearance spaces both in advance of and beyond the sewing point in the machine for the sewed portions of the shoe parts and for the operators fingers in grasping the parts, the post is provided with vertically extending angular recesses 78 and 80 (see Figs. 2, and 6) including abrupt drops at the forward and rear ends of the abutment of greater width transverse to. the seam line at the lower portion of the bracket 32 beneath the shuttle than at the upper portion of the bracket 32 near the work engaging surface of the abutment. The additionaltransverse width of the recesses is accommodated below the shuttle and upper bearing 58. Enclosing the two post brackets 32 and 39 are a pair of side plates 79 fitting the general configuration ofthe brackets and secured along their edges to the shuttle bracket 32. The rearward side plate 79 is supported at its upper end in-partby the spindle 76 on the bracket 32 to prevent accidental contact with the pointed beak of the shuttle 62.

While not as essential in avoiding excessive distortion in the manufacture of high-arch slip-lasted shoes as a short dimension of the work engaging abutment beyond the sewing point of less than one-quarter of an inch, a similardimension in advance of the sewing point also is of assistance to enable the operator to guide the parts as close as possible to the sewing point. Accordingly, the

full length of the work engaging surface on the abutment along the seam line is made with a total dimension of less than one-half of an inch. A supporting surface dimension of less than one-quarter of an inch in advance of the sewing point is of advantage in positioning the parts of a shoe with their edges in register throughout a-greater distance in advance of the sewing point than is possible without the short advance dimension. It is possible accordingly for the operator to deform theparts readily in advance of the sewing point to an extent equal to that beyond the sewing point and to provide space for the operators fingers closer to the sewing point than heretofore available in this type of machine. v

With the present construction of the work engaging abutment member 70 (see Fig. 28) high arch right shoe partsjare broughteasily into conformity with smooth curvatures and without excessive distortion as" illustrated in Fig. 29 before the inside shank ofthe shoe is reached.

. The sewing operation may then be bro'ught to completion 'with uniformly desirable results. As illustrated in Fig, 30,

it isevident that the completed shoe isfree from separations between its sock lining and platform sole and after application of the shoe to a last accurate conformity is insured. In sewing a left shoe composed .of a platform sole 81, a sock lining 82 and an upper 83 (Fig. 31) the same benefits are obtained While operating along the inside of the arch. r v 1 To assist further in guiding the parts properly and to avoid the possibility of the platform sole in a shoe coming into contact with the needle, the nonfeeding presser foot, indicated at 84, is provided with ahorizontal nib 85 (Fig. 12) projecting transversely one side only from the line of the seam inserted by the needle, at a distance above the work clamping surface of the non-feeding foot and above the work engaging surface of the work support equal to the thickness of the platform sole. The edge of the platform sole is guided by engagement with the lower end of the presser foot 84. The nib holdsa portion along the margin of the platform sole adjacent to the guided edge in a horizontal position, causing the sole to bend a short distance from the edge (see Figs. 4 and 8). In this way flexure of the sock lining 82 at the edge of the platform sole 81 is avoided'and the needle is able to pass in close parallel relation to the edge of the sole without engaging it.

For guiding the edge of the upper operated upon the illustrated machine is equipped with a yieldingly mounted upper gage 86 located at one side of the seam line and slidingly supported on the machine frame in a vertical guideway of a bracket 88. The bracket 88 has a vertical slot 90 (see Fig. 4) through which passes a stud 92 entering into threaded engagement with the edge gage. Between the upper end of the slot 90 and the stud 92 is a compression spring 94 acting yieldingly to press the edge gage in a downward direction toward the work supporting abutment. To limit the downward movement of the upper gage, the bracket has threaded into it a vertical stop screw 95 arranged to engage the stud 90 in its lowermost position. .I p

For moving the upperfgag'e toward and from the needle to vary the margin of the seam, the bracket 88 has a horizontal groove into which fits the rib of a mounting plate 96 (see Figs. 3, '4, l4 and 15) secured to the overhanging armof the machine frame by apairof clamp screws 98 The bracket 88 also has a vertical notch into which enters a collar 100 (see Fig. 14) on a thumb screw 102, the thumb screw being threaded into a horizontal passage in the mounting plate 96. To hold thebracket ends of the binding strip during the sewing operation. 7

Accordingly, the ends of the binding strip are left projecting at least one-half inch.

- To enable passage of the projecting ends on the binding strip through the machine during sewing Without interference with the feeding movement, the work engaging end of the upper gage 86 is. beveled in advance'of the sewing. point, as best shown in Figs. 1 and 15. Also the upper end of the work engaging abutment is-recessed at v 106 (see Figs. 7, Sand 9) .below its work engaging surface. As the projecting end of a binding strip 194 approaches the sewing point it is deflected beneath the upper gage 86 and is received into the recess 106 to present ..a firm edge along the upper to the upper gage. If the binding strip is of excessive thickness, the upper gage 'Will yield upwardly a short distance,compressing the spring 90 to accommodate the excess.

The serially arranged and alternately acting work clamps in the machine embodying the invention, comprise on the'one hand, the nonfeeding presser foot 84, which also acts as a platform gage, and the upper surface of the abutment 70 in advance of the sewing point and in the line of the seam. On the'other hand, the work feeding clamp comprises the feed foot 10'provided at its work engaging lower end with the needle guiding perforation.

The needle assists also in the feeding movement while engaging the work, thework being gripped between the 211 .z ee ot;: and-th t e dog. 1 also: pr e i a .n ed essuidiusape fe a on- F eding m vement..-is :thus impartedto the. workby the combined actionofthe feed ,foot, thefeed dogandgthe-needle, all ofthe clamping and feeding. instruments contributing to providean arrangement capable of sewingthe parts of a high-arch slip-lasted shoe with the stress divided equally betweenthesock 1in- -.ingand.-upper. vVllhenusedto-sew. a shoe havinga plat- .form soleattached to the sock lining, the edges of the parts may be brought into registerywith each other without-localized distortion tosuch an. extent as will cause 1 irregularities. in the resulting shoes.

.In order to regulate the distance. between the line of the seam insertedby .the.;maehine from the edge of. the pre-cut platform-sole: the. nonfeedingpresser ,foot 84, which acts as a platform gage, is constructed with an adjustment toenableit to movelaterally of the line of the seam. Referring-more particularly to. Figs. 16 to 19 inclusive, the non-feeding footis rotatably mounted on a ,yertical screw stud 1081hayinganenlarged portion passingthroughthe .presser .foot 84:into a threaded passage in. a; block- 110 secured to :thenonfeeding .presser foot bar in place of the presser foot 84 described, above. The work; engaging and clamping-end of the. presser foot 84 is capableof swinging .rnovement about the screw stud 1 108. ;To secure the presser foot 84 in clamped position, it; hasan upstandingflangethrough which passesv a pair .of set screws 112 engaging a flat surface. 1l4 on the block. 1 10at either side ofthe screw stud 108, one stud screw acting to move the presser foot in one direction and the; other to move .-it in the other direction. When both set screwsare tightened thepresser foot is secured in adjusted position.

To assist insertion or removal of a shoe from the machine, especially where the upper has an edge binding (Figs.-11 and 12), projeeting'beyondits outer'edge, the upper gage 86 is raisedas theclamping presser foot 84 is lifted from vitswork clamping position. To this end the presser foot 84 has projecting :from its rearward edge a-lug portion 116. disposedgbeneath a set screw.118v pro- .vided .with a check nut 120 engaged with a lug. on. the upper gage 86. When the presser foot 85 is lifted,.,the lug 116 engages the set screw 118 and the uppergage .86 is raised against the force. ofits-spring 94. .Upon insertion of a newshoe ,in the machine, the upper gage :86 being raised, .no interference is met inapplying the shoe to the work engaging. abutment member 70 in a .position where :the first stitchwill be inserted in the binding strip. As the presser foot.84 is lowered to clamp the work, the upper gage 86 descendscwith it across the 50 vedges of the shoe parts to deflect the bindingstriplM downwardly into the position of Fig. 12.

"While the improved machine described and illustrated is of advantage in sewing a high-arch slip-lasted shoe in which a platform sole i sattached to the sock lining be- .fore sewing, the-machine also is extremely beneficial in sewing slip-lasted shoes ofthe ordinary type having no platform sole for guiding the seam. A benefit in using .the machine with the ordinary type slip-lasted shoe lies in increased ease of presentingthe shoe to the machine and in more accurately fitting asewn shoe to a last on which it is to be .mounted after sewing. Also, with an ordinary type slip-lasted .shoe, permanently distorted .shoes are substantially.-avoided and repair operations to .correet excessive distortionare materially reduced.

The nature and scope. of therinvention having been indicated and an embodiment having been described, what .is claimed is:

1. A sewing-machine for uniting the registering edges of a. shoe upper andta sole member member whileunsupported by. a last, said machine having a vertical work .supportpost, lock stitch..forming devices, including a -,v,er tical straight.eye-pointedzneedle mounted, for. reciprocation toward and from the post, ashutt1e rotating about an .axis extendinglengthwise. of the. post, in-a position .where eaeh-.,l oop carried by the.;needle.is,.engaged by 12 ntheshuttl aend. woialternatelys acting WQIfk clampsarranged1,-serially along the..l.ine.. of .a seam, being .inserted to ;griP.;andfeed..the;.,shoe parts, in combinationwith a: shoe. gripping abutmentat the upper end .of the post comprising,one member of one of: the clampsand hav- -.ing..a:horjzontal surfaceengaging the sewed section of tthehworkzbeyond the needle and being formed with a span along theseam linebeyond the needle ofless than zone-quarter ofan inch and with an abrupt drop of a depth, greater than-,theside height of ,the shoe upper at the end. of the spanbeyond the needle to clear downwardly curving sections .of.1the sewed shoe parts.

2. A sewing rnachine forfluniting the registering edges of ashoe upper and. a sole memberv while unsupported .15 by a last, .said .machine having a vertical work support post, lock stitch "forming devices, including a vertical straight eye-pointed needle mounted for reciprocation toward and from the post, a shuttle rotating about an axis extending lengthwise of the post in a position where .20 each loop carried by the needle is engaged bytheshuttle,

and two alternately acting work clamps arranged serially along the line of a seam being inserted to grip and feed the, shoe parts, in combination with a shoe gripping abutmentat the upper end of the post comprising one memher-ofone of the clampsyand-having a horizontal surface engaging'the-sewed section of the work beyond the needle-and beingformed with a span along'the seam line beyondthe needleof less than one-quarter .of an -inch, with a-shoe engagingprojection extending trans- -versely-ofthe seam line a distance less than one-eighth of arr-inch and-with-abrupt drops of'depths greater than -=theside =height-of the shoe upper at the ends .of the spanand at-the edge-of the transverse projection toclear '-downwardly curving sections of the shoe parts both along 1 the :-seam=line and transversely thereto.

13. A: sewing machine foruniting the registering edges of: a=1shoe..upper and a sole member while. unsupported :by..a:-.last, said machine havinga vertical work support -..post,. lock.stitch forming devices, including a vertical straight eye-pointed needle mounted for reciprocation ztoward and'from thepost, a shuttle rotating about an ;.axis extending lengthwise of the post in a position where 1 each loop carried by, theneedle is. engaged by the shuttle,

;.andtwo alternately acting work clamps arranged serially along the lineofa seam being inserted to grip and feed the shoe parts, in combination with a shoe gripping abutmentatithempper end of the post comprising one mem- ;ber :of one;of' the clamps andhavinga horizontal surxface:engaging. the sewed section of the work beyond ;.the needle andbeing formed .Witha span along the seam --line beyondthe needle of less than one-quarter of an inch, with-..a: shoe engaging projection extending trans- ;v.ersely of the seam line ;a.;distance less than-one-eighth pofqan inchrand with abrupt dropsof depths greater than the; sideheight-ofthe shoe upper at the ends of the span .and; atthe edge-of the, transverse projection to elear down- .wardly. curying sections of Qtheshoe parts both along ;the seam lineand transversely thereto, said post, being .cut awaytoform in the abutment an angular recess including the abrupt .drop, of .greater width transverse -to t he-seam ;line-.at the lower portion of the post-be- ;neathytheshuttlethan. at :the upper portion of the post near the-work engaging surface of the abutment.

-.4. Azsewingzmachine foruniting the registering edges -of ashoe upperand a sole member while unsupported by .astitch last, said machine having a work support post, lock stitch forming devices, including a straight eye-pointed needle mounted for reciprocation toward and from. the post, a shuttle rotating about an axis extending lengthwise ..,of thepostin a positiqn where each loop. carried by the 1 1ee dle ,is engaged by the shuttle, and two alternately ,actingwork clamps engaging the edgesof the shoe parts serially alongflthe line of a seam;being inserted to grip and-feed the shoe parts, in combination with a stationary abutment, at the. upper. end .of the post comprising I one member, of one of'theplarnpssaid abutmenthaving a 7 surface engaging thejsewe'd portion of the work both in advance of and beyond the needle with a span along the seam line of less than one-half of an inch and with abrupt drops of depths greater than the side height of the shoefupper at the ends of the span to clear downwardly curving sections of the shoe parts.

5. A sewing machine for uniting the registering edges of a shoe upper and a sole member while unsupported by a last, said machine having a work support post, lock stitch forming devices, including a straight eye-pointed needle mounted for reciprocation toward and from the post, a shuttle rotating about an axis extending lengthwise of the post in a position where each loop carried by the needle is engaged by the shuttle, and two alternately acting work clamps engaging the edges of the'shoe parts serially along the line of a seam being inserted to grip and feed the shoe parts, in combination with a stationary abutment at the upper end of the post comprising one member of one of the clamps, said abutment having a surface engaging the sewed portion of the work both in advance of and beyond the needle with a span along the seam line of less than one-half of an inch, with a shoe engaging projection extending transversely of the seam line a distance of less than one-eighth of an inch and with abrupt drops greater than the side height of a shoe upper at the ends of the span and at the edge of the transverse projection to clear downwardly curving sections of the shoe parts both along the seam line and'transversely thereto. j i i 6. A sewing machine for uniting the registering edges of a shoe upper and a sole member while unsupported by a last, said machine having a work support post, lock stitch forming devices, including a straight eye-pointed needle mounted for reciprocation toward and from the post, a shuttle rotating about an axis extending lengthwise of the post in a position where each loop carried by the needle is engaged by the shuttle, .and two alternately acting work clamps engaging the edges of the shoe parts serially along the line of a seam being inserted to grip and feed the shoe parts, in combination with a stationary abutment at the upper end of the post comprising one member of one of the clamps, said abutment having a surface engaging the sewed portion of the work both in advance of and beyond the needle with a span along the seam line of less than one-half of an inch, with a shoe engaging projection extending transversely of the seam line a distance of less than one-eighth of an inch and with abrupt drops greater than the side height of a shoe upper at the ends of the span and at the edge of the transverse projection to clear downwardly curving sections of the shoe parts both along the seam line and transversely thereto, said post being cut away to form a drop at the end of the span beyond the sewing point in the machine with an angular recess of greater width transverse to the seam line at the lower portion of the post beneath the shuttle than at the upper portion.

7. A sewing machine for uniting the registering edges of a shoe upper and a sole member while unsupported by a last, said machine having a work support post, lock stitch forming devices, including a straight eye-pointed needle mounted for reciprocation toward and from the post, a shuttle rotating about an axis extending lengthwise of the post in a position where each loop carried by the needle is engaged by the shuttle, and two alternately acting work clamps engaging the edges of the shoe parts serially along the line of a seam being inserted to grip and feed the shoe parts, in combination with a stationary abutment at the upper end of the post comprising one member of one of the clamps, said abutment'having a surface engaging the sewed portion of the work both in advance of and beyond the needle with a span along the seam line of less than one-half of an inch, with a shoe engaging projection extending transversely of the seam line a distance of less than one-eighth of an inch and with abrupt drops greater than the side height of a shoe upper at the ends of the span and at the edge of the transverse 14 projection to clear downwardly curving sections of the shoe parts both along theseam line and transversely thereto, said post being cut away to form vertically extending angular recesses of greater widths transverse to the seam line at the lower portion of the post beneath the shuttle than at the upper portion.

8. A sewing machine for uniting the registering edges of a shoe upper and a sole member while unsupported by a last, said machine having a vertical work support post, lock stitch forming devices, including a vertical straight eye-pointed needle mounted for reciprocation toward and from the post, a shuttle rotating about an axis extending lengthwise of the post in a position where each loop carried by the needle is engaged by the shuttle, two-alternately acting work clamps arranged serially along the line of the seam being inserted to grip and feed the shoe parts and separate individually adjustable brackets for the work support and shuttle, the work support bracket being cut ofi shorter at its upper end than the shuttle bracket, in combination with a separate V-shaped work engaging abutment secured to the cutaway upper end of the work suport bracket, the smaller end of the V-shaped abutment being uppermost and its lower spaced ends being secured to the upper end of the work support bracket.

9. A sewing machine for uniting the registering edges of a shoe upper and a sole member while unsupported by a last, said machine having a vertical work support post, lock stitch forming devices, including a vertical straight eye-pointed needle mounted for reciprocation toward and from the post, a shuttle rotating about an axis extending lengthwise of the post in a position where each loop carried by the needle is engaged by the shuttle,

two alternately acting work clamps arranged serially.

work engaging abutment secured to the cutaway upper end of the work support bracket, the smaller end of the V-shaped abutment being uppermost and its lower spaced ends being secured to the upper end of the work support bracket, and a strut connecting the lower spaced ends of the V-shaped abutment.

10. A sewing machine for uniting the registering edges of a shoe upper and a sole member while unsupported by a last, said machine having a vertical work support post, lock stitch forming devices, including a vertical straight eye-pointed needle mounted for reciprocation toward and from the post, a shuttle rotating about an axis extending lengthwise of the post in a position where each loop carried by the needle is engaged by the shuttle, two alternately acting work clamps arranged serially along the line of a seam being inserted to grip and feed the shoe parts, including a presser foot and a feed dog, and separate individually adjustable brackets for the work support and shuttle, the work support bracket being cut ofi shorter at its upper end than the shuttle bracket, in combination with a separate V-shaped, work engaging abutment secured to the upper end of the work support bracket, said abutment having its smaller end uppermost and its lower spaced ends connected to the work support bracket, and a feed dog receiving slot in the upper smaller end of the abutment, said abutment having inclined sides forming abrupt drops surrounding the feed dog.

11. A sewing machine for uniting the registering edges of a shoe upper and a sock lining to which is attached a smaller-sized platform sole centered on the sock lining to provide projecting marginal edges, said shoe parts being unsupported by a last, said machine having a work support post, and lock stitch forming devices, including a vertical straight eye-pointed needle mounted for reciprocation toward and from the post, in combination with a work clamp arranged to grip the shoe parts being operated vppvon .alongithe, linesotithe seam inserte.d,,:com-

-jeotingv edgepf, the. .socklining against ,the work, support and forming aplatforrn sole edge guide, said presser .foot

qhavingashorizontal -.nib projecting transversely, atone side only from the line of the seaminserted by theineedle a, distanceabove the. Work clampingsurfaceof, said foot equaLto the thickness, of the platform s'oleto hold :the ,inarginalredgevoft the platformsole in a horizontal, positioniand toscause the platform sole-to vbend a short .distancefrom its extreme edge, thereby. preventingfiexure of the sock lining at-the. edgetofjthe, platform sole.

12. A, shoedsewingirnachine: for,uniti 1g,the registering edges of a sock liningand .an upper, having an edge hindingr strip-projecting ,beyondnthe edges of 'the ipper, said rrnachinedhaving a WOrk. clamp including a Work supportuarranged togrip .the shoe parts along-the ,line of the seam inserted and stitch forming devicesincluding a vertical-straight eye-pointedneedle mounted-for reeiprocationtowardand from the work support, in com- -,hination=.with aneuppengagelocated atone side of the seam line and formed with a beveledworkengaging.end to deflect beneath it theprOjecting end .of -,the binding strip as :the edge of the .shoe. upper approaches thesewing point, and a springactinguon the upper, gagefor pressing it yieldingly -toward the/.work s lpport toenahle the projecting end of a bindingastriprto be deflected beneath the ippergageiasthe sewing; pointris approached, the .work supportbeing. recessedv .below its work engaging surface opposite theiworkuengagingend of theupper gage to'receive the binding-stripes it is 'deflectedbeneath the upper. gage.

13. A. shoesewing machine, for uniting the, registering edgesof avsock linipg and anppperhavingaan edgebind- .a vertical straight eyepointed ,needlernountdf for reciprocation toward .and irom the workwsupport, said ,work clamp. also including apresser .footmovably mounted onthe frameltotclamp vand releasevthe work,ein combination with an upper, gage \locatedationesideof .the seam line and; supported on the ma'chineirarne. formovement toward-and from the-work-support, means acting. yieldingly tov press -the upper gagetoward the work support, and means, for raising the upper gageuasvthepresser foot is liftedfrom itswork clamping positioneornprisinga portion of the presser, foot ,andhmeansscarried by the upper gage engaged thereby when-thepresserioot isllifted to raise the upper gage from the work supportiforconvient insertion, of the upper.

:Reterences. Citeddnthetfilev .of this patent UNITED. STATESZPATENTS 2,300,585 .M'e'Cann -Nov. 3, 1942 2,3113407 MeFalls et 'al Feb.- 16, 1943 2,610,597 "Simmons'et'al Sept. 16, 1952 FOREIGN PATENTS 254,024 Great Britain June 28, -=1926

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2300585 *Nov 9, 1940Nov 3, 1942Singer Mfg CoArticle attaching machine
US2311407 *Jun 12, 1940Feb 16, 1943Cluett Peabody & Co IncSewing machine attachment
US2610597 *Oct 2, 1948Sep 16, 1952Connova Frank JWork supporting and guiding device for shoe sewing machines
GB254024A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3051105 *Aug 25, 1958Aug 28, 1962United Shoe Machinery CorpShoe sewing machines
US3080836 *Mar 9, 1961Mar 12, 1963United Shoe Machinery CorpAutomatic work guidance mechanisms
US5174227 *May 2, 1991Dec 29, 1992Mim Industries, Inc.Extended post sewing machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification112/36, 112/62
International ClassificationD05B15/00
Cooperative ClassificationD05D2303/02, D05B15/00
European ClassificationD05B15/00