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Publication numberUS2742059 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 17, 1956
Filing dateNov 9, 1951
Priority dateFeb 22, 1951
Publication numberUS 2742059 A, US 2742059A, US-A-2742059, US2742059 A, US2742059A
InventorsWatts Gilbert Ernest
Original AssigneeJ H Fenner & Co Holdings Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multiple-ply textile fabrics
US 2742059 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 7, 1956 G. E. WATTS 2,742,059

MULTIPLE-FLY TEXTILE FABRICS Filed Nov. 9, 1951 b will Q 11 11 11 11 Invmmr United, States Patent MULTIPLE-FLY TEXTILE FABRICS Application November 9, 1951, Serial No. 255,566

Claims priority, application Great Britain February 22, 1951 2 Claims. (Cl. 139-409) The present invention relates to improvements in multiple-ply textile fabrics suitable, for example, for power transmission belting or for band conveyors.

Multiple-ply textile fabrics are known of the type having three or more plies, and wherein the intermediate ply of three adjacent plies is bound to the outer of the said plies by means of two sets of binder threads, one set from one outer ply and the other set from the other outer ply.

A multiple-ply textile fabric of this type has been pro posed wherein the binder threads of one set pass under alternate weft threads of the intermediate ply and wherein the binder threads of the other set pass over the same weft threads of the intermediate ply. Thus the said alternate weft threads of the intermediate ply are associated with the binder threads of both sets, .tand weft threads intermediate the said alternate weft threads of the intermediate ply are not associated with binder threads.

According to one aspect of the present invention in a .multiple-ply textile fabric of the type set forth the binder threads of one set pass under certain weft threads of the intermediate ply and the binder threads of the other set pass over other weft threads of the intermediate ply. Thus each weft thread of the intermediate ply is associated with at most, one set of binder threads in contradistinction to the already proposed multiple-ply textile fabric set forth above wherein alternate weft threads of the intermediate ply are associated with two sets of binder threads. In a multiple-ply textile fabric according to this aspect of the present invention, therefore, extra space is available in the centre ply for the inclusion of an extra warp thread, if desired.

Each weft thread of the intermediate ply may be associated with a binder thread of one of said sets. The binder threads preferably pass alternately under and over each successiveweft thread of the intermediate ply and the binder threads of one set are preferably disposed directly over the binder threads of the other set.

'The intermediate ply may carry a normal warp thread disposed in the opposite weaving path to the binder threads whereby to balance the latter.

According to a further aspect of the present invention, in a multiple-ply textile fabric, an outer ply is of open mesh weave and the weave of an adjacent ply bounds the open meshes thereof at one side, the said outer ply carrying a covering of a natural or synthetic rubber or plastic which projects into the said first mentioned ply substantially only in the individual open meshes thereof.

According to a still further aspect of the present invention a multiple-ply textile fabric has an open mesh or pocketed surface into which a continuous covering of a natural or synthetic rubber or plastic on an outer ply extends only at small regular intervals.

The said adjacent ply is preferably of close mesh weave.

The invention includes a multiple-ply textile fabric belt, for example, for power transmission or comprising a conveyor band, including three or more plies Woven according to the present invention, wherein at least an outer ply of the belt is of open mesh weave, the belt having a covering of a natural or a synthetic rubber or plastic such as natural rubber or polyvinyl-chloride bonded thereto.

The invention further includes a multiple-ply textile fabric belt for such a purpose, including three or more plies woven according to the present invention wherein the warp threads of a ply or plies other than the outer plies are of filament (preferably high tenacity) rayon.

The invention will be further described by way of example with reference to the accompanying drawing which shows a diagrammatic weft sectional elevation through one form of construction of belt or conveyor band.

In the drawing a power transmission belt or conveyor band is formed of a 3-ply fabric namely, outer plies gen erally denoted 10 and 11 and intermediate ply generally denoted 12. The outer plies include half the number of Weft threads 10a and 11a per unit length than the number of weft threads 12a per unit length of the intermediate ply. The intermediate ply 12 is bound to the outer plies 10, 11 by means of two sets of binder .threads. The binder threads such as 14 of one set pass under alternate weft threads 12a of the intermediate ply, and binder threads such as 15 of the other set pass over the intermediate Weft threads 12a of the intermediate ply. The intermediate ply carries a warp thread 13 disposed in the opposite weaving path to the binder threads whereby to balance the latter.

Each of the three plies in addition to the aforementioned threads, carry pairs of oppositely woven normal warp threads 10b, 11b and 12b respectively. The binder threads of one set are disposed directly over the binder threads of another set. Thus repeat patterns of the intermediate ply each comprise (on each weft thread) in succession a binder thread of one set, a warp thread to balance the said binder thread, and a pair of normal oppositely Woven warp threads. Repeat patterns of the outer plies each comprise in succession only a binder thread of one set and a pair of normal oppositely woven warp threads. Thus the outer plies are less dense than the intermediate ply and are of an open mesh weave. The outer plies are covered with a synthetic plastic 16 such as polyvinyl-chloride bonded thereto.

The warp threads of the intermediate ply may be of filament (preferably high tenacity) rayon (as distinct from spun rayon).

Two or more threads of higher count may be substituted for a thread of lower count with the object of maintaining a predetermined bulk and strength factor.

I claim:

'-1. A three-ply textile fabric comprising a pair of outer plies, hereinafter referred to as the upper outer ply and the lower outer ply, each consisting of a set of weft threads and a set of pairs of oppositely plain woven nor mal warp threads, an intermediate ply disposed between said outer plies, and comprising a set of weft threads and a set of pairs of oppositely plain woven normal warp threads, the ratio of the number of weft threads per unit length of said outer plies to the number of weft threads per unit length of said intermediate ply being 1:2, a first set of binder threads passing under alternate weft threads of the intermediate ply and over each weft thread of the upper outer ply, and a second set of binder threads, passing over alternate weft threads of the intermediate ply other than those alternate weft threads under which the first set of binder threads passes, and passes under each weft thread of the lower outer ply.

2. A three-ply textilefabric comprising a pair of outer plies, hereinafter referred to as the upper outer ply and the lower outer ply, each consisting of a set of weft threads and a set of pairs of oppositely plain woven normal Warp threads, an intermediate ply disposed between said outer plies, and comprising a set of weft threads and a set of pairs of oppositely plain woven normal: Warp threads, the ratio of the number of weft threads per unit length of said outer plies to the number of weft threads per unit length of said intermediate ply being 1:2, a first set of binder threads passing under alternate Weft threads of the intermediate ply and over each weft thread of the upper outer ply, a second set of binder threads, passing over alternate weft threads of the intermediate ply other than those alternate Weft threads under which the first set of binder threads passes, and passing under each weft thread of the lower outer ply, and a balancing warp thread carried by said intermediate ply and disposed in the opposite weaving path to the binder threads whereby to balance the latter.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Re. 21,700 Whittier Jan. 21, 1941 848,121 Moore Mar. 26, 1907 944,125 Brooks Dec. 21, 1909 2,157,082 Milnes May 2, 1939 2,423,910 Snow et a'l.- July 15, 1947 2,540,874 Geddings Feb. 6, 1951 2,574,200 Teague Nov. 6, 1951 FOREIGN PATENTS 333,162

Great Britain Aug. 14, 1930

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US848121 *May 23, 1904Mar 26, 1907Multiple Woven Hose & Rubber CoMultiply fabric.
US944125 *Apr 6, 1907Dec 21, 1909John C BrooksTextile fabric.
US2157082 *Apr 16, 1937May 2, 1939Ayers LtdFelt
US2423910 *Apr 26, 1944Jul 15, 1947Southern Friction Materials CoWoven fabric
US2540874 *May 25, 1949Feb 6, 1951Julian Geddings SaintFelt for papermaking machines
US2574200 *May 23, 1950Nov 6, 1951Us Rubber CoMethod of making stretchable woven fabrics
USRE21700 *Jul 1, 1937Jan 21, 1941MtDrier felt
GB333162A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3197021 *Nov 28, 1962Jul 27, 1965Russell Mfg CoRibbed conveyor belt
US3220216 *May 4, 1964Nov 30, 1965Bliss E W CoAircraft launching and arresting device
US3885603 *Nov 21, 1973May 27, 1975Creech Evans SPapermaking fabric
USRE35777 *Sep 30, 1993Apr 28, 1998Huyck Licensco, Inc.Self stitching multilayer papermaking fabric
Classifications
U.S. Classification139/409, 139/411
International ClassificationD03D11/00
Cooperative ClassificationD03D11/00, D03D2700/0114
European ClassificationD03D11/00