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Publication numberUS2742887 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 24, 1956
Filing dateMay 18, 1953
Priority dateMay 18, 1953
Publication numberUS 2742887 A, US 2742887A, US-A-2742887, US2742887 A, US2742887A
InventorsAde Fred O, Hollingsworth John R
Original AssigneeAde Fred O, Hollingsworth John R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rope starter mechanism
US 2742887 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 24, 1956 F. o. ADE EFAL 2,742,887

ROPE STARTER MECHANISM Filed May 18, 1953 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 F g. A.

F red 0. Ade John R. Hal/ingsworfh INVENTORS (you y 19% April 24, 1956 F. o. ADE EI'AL 2,742,887

ROPE STARTER MECHANISM Filed May 18, 1953 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Fig. 3

Fred 0. Ade John R. Hal/ings worfh INVENTORS BY (ma WW fiM 2,742,887 Patented Apr. 24, 1956 fitice 2,742,887 ROPE STARTER MECHANISM Fred 0. Ade and John R. Hollingsworth, Drexel Hill, Pa. Application May 18, 1953, Serial No. 355,818 Claims. (Cl. 123-485) This invention relates in general to improvements in starter mechanisms, and more specifically to an improved rope starter mechanism.

It is the primary object of this invention to provide an improved rope starter mechanism which may be operatively connected to a small internal combustion engine for I the selective rotation of the same for starting purpose.

Another object of this invention is to provide an improved rope starter mechanism which may be conveniently mounted with respect to the small internal combustion engine for operative engagement therewith, the mounting of the rope starter mechanism requiring a minimum of modification for mounting of the internal combustion engine.

Another object of this invention is to provide an improved rope starter mechanism for a small internal combustion engine which is of a relatively simple construction and which is formed of readily obtainable material so as to be economically feasible.

A further object of this invention is to provide an improved rope starter mechanism which is semi-automatic in operation, the rope starter mechanism requiring merely the manual unlatching of lock means thereof and the pulling on a pull rope to rotate a starter shaft thereof to impart a rotary movement to an associated internal combustion engine.

A still further object of this invention is to provide an improved rope starter mechanism which is extremely compact so that the same may be mounted at the front of an internal combustion engine and occupy a minimum of space.

These together with other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of to clearly illustrate the details thereof;

order to clearly illustrate the manner in which a pull rope is attached thereto and the manner in which an elongated spring is operatively connected to the pulley for returning the same to an initial position whereby the pull rope is automatically rewound thereon;

Figure 3 is a transverse vertical. sectional view taken substantially upon the plane indicated by the section line 3-3 of Figure 1 and shows the general relationship of latch means for retaining the starter shaft in an inoperative position, the latch means being shown in a starter shaft released position by dotted lines; and

Figure 4 is a longitudinal sectional view taken substantially upon the plane indicated by the section line- 4-4 of Figure 2 and shows the general construction of the rope starter mechanism.

Referring now to the drawings in detail, it is seen that the rope-starter mechanism is referred to in general by the reference numeral 10. The rope starter mechanism 10 includes a mounting bracket assembly which is referred to in general by the reference numeral 12. The mounting bracket assembly 12 includes a transversely extending angular member 14 which is normally a radiator support for an internal combustion engine 16 for which the rope starter mechanism 10 is intended. Carried by the angle member 14 is a longitudinally extending sleeve 18 which is rigidly secured to the angle member 14 and projects both forwardly and rearwardly thereof. The mounting bracket assembly 12 also includes an angular base member 20 which has a longitudinally extending leg thereof secured to the angle member 14 and a forward transversely extending leg 22 which is connected to the sleeve 18 adjacent the forward end thereof.

Referring now to Figure 4 in particular, it will be seen that the rear portion of the sleeve 18 is provided with an internal bushing 24 which is secured to the sleeve 18 by welding as at 26. Disposed in the forward portion of the sleeve 18 is an elongated bushing 28 which projects out of the forward end of the sleeve 18. It will be noted that closest or nearest ends of the respective bushings 24 and 28 are spaced apart a considerable distance for a purpose to subsequently become apparent.

Rotatably mounted within the bushing 28 and 24 is an elongated starter shaft 30. The starter shaft 30 has disposed at the rear end thereof a transversely extending pin 32 which is disposable in a pair of diametrically opposed notches 34 in a starter engaging extension 36 of a crank shaft (not shown) of the internal combustion engine 16.

The forward end of the starter shaft 30 has mounted thereon for rotation therewith a pulley 38. The pulley 38 is removably secured to the starter shaft 30 by a pin 40. Entrained about the pulley 38 is a pull rope 42 which has secured to a free end thereof a handle 44. It will be understood that when the handle 44 is pulled the pull rope 42 is pulled off of the pulley 38 which results in rotation of the pulley. Rotation of the pulley 38 will obviously result in rotation to the starter shaft 30.

Carried by the bushing 28, whose forward end engages the hub portion of the pulley 38 is a transversely extending stop member 46. As is best illustrated in Figure 1. the stop member 46 has an offset outer end 48 which carries a tubular guide 50 through which the pull rope'42 passes.

Carried by the stop member 46 adjacent its connection with'the bushing 28 is a longitudinallyextending pin 52. The pin 52 has a rearwardly extending portion which is slidably received in a bore 54 in the transverse leg 22 of the brace member 20. The pin 52 also has a forwardly extending portion which is disposed within the confines of the central portion of the pulley 38.

From the foregoing description of the various elements of the rope starter mechanism, it will be seen that limited, the same is provided with an intermediate shoulder 60 which engages the rear of the bushing 24. It will be understood that the shoulder 60 is reciprocable longitudinally through the sleeve 18 toward and away from the bushing 24.

It will be understood that when the starter shaft 30 is moved rearwardly in response to urging of the coil spring 56, the pin 32 engages in the notches 34 so that when the starter shaft 30 is rotated the crank shaft of the internal combustion engine 16 will be correspondingly rotated. It will also be understood that the notches 34 are so formed whereby when the internal combustion engine 16 begins to run the pin 32 is thrown out of the notches 34 and the starter shaft 30 moved forwardly by such reaction.

In order to retain the starter shaft 30 in a forward position, the stop member 46 is provided with a latch 62. The latch 62 is pivotally carried by a pivot pin 64 supported by the stop member 46 intermediate its ends. The latch 62 is generally channel shaped in cross sec tion and includes an enlarged end portion 66 which is disposable between the stop member 46' and the leg 22 of the brace member 20. In order that the latch 62 may have its end portion 66 disposed between the stop member 46 and the leg 22, there is carried by the pivot pin 64 a spring member 68 which has one end hooked over the pin 52. The other end of the spring 68 engages the underside of the outer portion of the latch 62 to urge the same upwardly with the result that the end portion 66 thereof is moved downwardly between the stop member 46 and the leg 22. The end portion 66 engages the pin 52 and is retained in the desired latching position.

It will be understood that when the latch 62 is in the desired latching position, the stop member 46 is prevented from moving rearwardly with respect to the sleeve 18. This results in the retention of the bushing 28 against rearward movement which also results in the retention of the pulley 38 against rearward movement. The retention of the pulley 38 retains the starter shaft 30 in a forward position.

In order that the pull rope 42 may automatically be rewound upon the pulley 38, the pulley 38 has mounted therein a spring member of the clock spring type, the spring member being referred to by the reference numeral 70. The spring member 70 has an outer end thereof secured to the pulley 38 by pin 72. The inner end of the spring member 70 is provided with a loop 74 which is engaged over the pin 52.

In operation, when it is desired to utilize the rope starter mechanism 10, the latch 62 is first manually moved to an inoperative position. When the handle 44 is grasped and the pull rope 42 pulled through the guide 50 with the result that it is reeled off of the pulley 3S and the pulley is rotated. Rotation of the pulley 38 results in rotation of the starter shaft 30. Inasmuch as the starter shaft 30 was initially moved rearwardly by the coil spring 56 upon release of the latch 62 and the pin 32 engaged in the notches 34, it will be seen that the crank shaft of the internal combustion engine 16 is rotated. If the internal combustion engine 16 is not started on the first pull of the pull rope 42, the same is released and the spring member 70 automatically rewinds the same on the pulley 38. The pull rope 42 is continued to be pulled until such time as the internal combustion engine 16 starts. As pointed out above, when the internal combustion engine starts the starter shaft 30 is urged rearwardly. It will be understood that the starter shaft 30 moves rearwardly a distance sufficient for the latch 62 to once again engage between the stop member 46 and the leg 22 with the result that the starter shaft 30 is retained in a forward position and out of the engagement with the starter extension 26 of the internal combustion engine 16. It will therefore be seen that the operation of the rope starter mechanism 10 is semi-auto matic.

From the foregoing, the construction and operation of the device will be readily understood and further explanation is believed to be unnecessary. However, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction shown anddescribed, and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. A rope starter mechanism comprising a mounting bracket, a starter shaft rotatably carried by said mounting bracket, means for selectively rotating said starter shaft, said starter shaft being movable longitudinally through said mounting bracket for driving engagement with an engine, said starter shaft being urged longitudinally through said mounting bracket into driving engagement with an engine by resilient means, latch means for rendering said resilient means ineffective, bushing elements slidably supported for longitudinal movement on the starter shaft, a stop member carried by said bushing element for longitudinal movement only, said stop member being engageable by said latch means.

2. A rope starter mechanism comprising a mounting bracket, a starter shaft rotatably carried by said mounting bracket, means for selectively rotating said starter shaft, said starter shaft being movable longitudinally through said mounting bracket for driving engagement with an engine, said starter shaft being urged longitudinally through said mounting bracket into driving engagement with an engine by resilient means, latch means for rendering said resilient means ineffective, bushing elements slidably supported for longitudinal movement on the starter shaft, a stop member carried by said bushing element for longitudinal movement only, said stop member being engageable by said latch means, said stop member being non-rotatably carried by said mounting bracket.

3. A rope starter mechanism comprising a mounting bracket, a starter shaft rotatably carried by said mounting bracket, means for selectively rotating said starter shaft, said starter shaft being movable longitudinally through said mounting bracket for driving engagement with an engine, said starter shaft being urged longitudinally through said mounting bracket into driving ongagement with an engine by resilient means, latch means for rendering said resilient means ineffective, bushing elements slidably supported for longitudinal movement on the starter shaft, a stop member carried by said bush ing element for longitudinal movement only, said stop member being engageable by said latch means, said rotating means including a pulley having a pull rope cntrained therearound, a. guide for said pull rope carried by said stop member.

4. A rope starter mechanism comprising a mounting bracket, a starter shaft rotatably carried by said mounting bracket, means for selectively rotating said starter shaft, said starter shaft being movable longitudinally through said mounting bracket for driving engagement with an engine, said starter shaft being urged longitudinally through said mounting bracket into driving engagement with an engine by resilient means, latch means for rendering said resilient means ineffective, bushing elements slidably supported for longitudinal movement on the starter shaft, a stop member carried by said bushing element for longitudinal movement only, said stop mem' her being engageable by said latch means, said rotating means including a pulley having a pull rope entrained thereover, spring means for urging said pulley to a re wind position.

5. A rope starter mechanism comprising a mounting bracket, a starter shaft rotatably carried by said mounting bracket, means for selectively rotating said starter shaft, said starter shaft being movable longitudinally through said mounting bracket for driving engagement with an engine, said starter shaft being urged longitudinally through said mounting bracket into driving engagement with an engine by resilient means, latch means for rendering said resilient means inettective, bushing elements slidably supported for longitudinal movement on the starter shaft, a stop member carried by said bushing element for longitudinal movement only, said stop member being engageable by said latch means, said rotating means including a pulley having a pull rope entrained thereover, spring means for urging said pulley to a rewind position, said stop member being engaged over a pin carried by said mounting bracket, one end of said spring means being connected to said pin.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1511651 *May 14, 1921Oct 14, 1924Tokheim Oil Tank & Pump CoLock for clutch mechanisms
US1789423 *Mar 2, 1929Jan 20, 1931Benson Joseph ScottStarter for outboard motors
US2232584 *Jul 22, 1940Feb 18, 1941Buffalo Springfield Roller CoDrive wheel lock
US2432483 *Apr 1, 1946Dec 9, 1947Miller WalterLatch operated axially engaging positive clutch
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2869531 *Feb 9, 1955Jan 20, 1959Elektroiux AbStarter for outboard motors
US3375814 *Nov 26, 1965Apr 2, 1968Eaton Stamping CoPulley construction for recoil starter
US4662158 *Mar 18, 1985May 5, 1987Andreas StihlBrushcutter having a starter arrangement
US5483931 *Jun 30, 1994Jan 16, 1996Andreas StihlDrive device especially for a trimmer
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/185.4, 192/114.00R, 123/185.3
International ClassificationF02N3/00, F02N3/02
Cooperative ClassificationF02N3/02
European ClassificationF02N3/02