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Publication numberUS2745403 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 15, 1956
Filing dateOct 14, 1954
Priority dateOct 14, 1954
Publication numberUS 2745403 A, US 2745403A, US-A-2745403, US2745403 A, US2745403A
InventorsSamuel D Goldberg
Original AssigneeSamuel D Goldberg
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Disposable cartridge type syringe
US 2745403 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 15, 1955 s. D. GOLDBERG 2,745,403

DISPOSABLE CARTRIDGE TYPE SYRINGE Filed Oct. 14, 1954 2 Sheets-Sheet l y 1956 s. D. GOLDBERG DISPOSABLE CARTRIDGE TYPE SYRINGE 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Oct. 14, 1954 INVENTOR.

United States Patent DI POSABLE SY l GE Samuel D. Goldberg, West Hempstead, N. Y.

App icat sn Ottehe 4, 5 Serial N 462,194

7 6 .Glaims. 01 128-218 invention relates, generally, to improvements in hypodermic syringes of the type used in medicine for the parenteral injection of medic'aments and the like, and, more particularly, it is concerned with a novel type of syringe that comprises a new form of disposable, singles iqs m d s me t sqma cartridge- Heretofore, it has been known to provide hypodermic syringes comprising a hollow body or shell, adapted to receive and hold a specific type and size of conventional elongate, tubular, medicament-containing cartridge, means being provided and functioning in structural association with the body to support a hypodermic needle in communication with the cartridge interior and means being provided, too, for moving a piston within the cartridge whereby the contents of the cartridge may be expelled through the needle. The needle conventionally used with this type of syringe ordinarily is sharply pointed at both ends and is mounted intermediate its ends in a,

collar or ferrule which may be internally threaded or otherwise shaped to permit its engagement with a mating part of the syringe body whereby one end of the needle is caused to pierce a partial closure terminating one end of the cartridge and enter the interior thereof Where the medicament is located. Usually, syringes of this type are breech-loading, i. e., the cartridge is' inserted into the syringe body trom the end opposite the end where the needle is mounted, and means, frequently in the form of an elaborate plug assembly engaging and coacting with the breech parts of the syringe body, is provided to force the cartridge as far as possible into the syringe body and toward the needlevbearing end thereof. The means for moving the piston withinthe cartridge also is mounted on and associated with this breech plug assembly and, in most types of syringes now commonly available, it consists of a freely slidable plunger, terminating at one end in a suitable handle and at the opposite end in means for e a in and moving. he satt d e s It will be understood that a hypodermic syringe must reflect, in structural design, a. proper appreciation of the conditions under which it is to be used, if it ,is to satisfy the fastidious requirements of the medical profession. capable of easy cleaning and sterilization, hence ,no part of it can be made of any material that is incapable of being autoclaved without ill effects. Furthermore, the com ponent parts of the syringe must have ruggedness sufiicient to withstand normal handling and use and to permit the user to apply the very substantial forces required to move a thick, viscous medicament through a fine-bore needle,

while not thereby making the instrument bulky and diffi- It is essential, for instance,,that the syringe be.

satisfactory in each of the features above mentioned. Indeed, the prior art syringes characteristically have disadvantages frequently observed in devices that essentially are mere adaptations of previously known structures, modified for use with later developed accessory devices, in this instance, adaptations of the traditional or classic types of syringes, modified in structure for use with the later developed types of medicament-containing, single-dosage size, disposable cartridges. The inadequacies of these adaptations lie in their preservation of faults of previously known types of syringes while failing fully to exploit advantages that might be derived from using cartridge; packed forms of drugs or other substances.

For exarnple, and this is one of the chief disadvantages of previously known types of cartridge syringes, these syringes individually have been adapted to use with merely a single form and dosage size of cartridge, hence it has been necessary for the physician to have available, both in the field and in his office, a whole series of syringes, adapted to accommodate cartridges of various sizes containing difierent dosages of medicaments. A syringe suitable for the administration of medicaments from cartridges having a volume of one cubic centimeter, for instance, would be structurally incapable of accepting longer cartridges of greater volume and would be functionally inoperative for use with cartridges of lesser volume.

This lack of adaptability of prior art types of syringes to use with cartridges difiering slightly in length from that of the cartridges for which the syringes specifically were designed has created problems, also, in instances when it is desired to administer ditferent forms of a medicament. For example, when charging a cartridge with a medicament or other substance in the form of an essentially homogeneous solution, an objective is to fill the cartridge chamber fully with no appreciable gas bubble trapped above the liquid. When, however, the medicament is in the form of a suspension or similar dispersion in an aqueous or oily vehicle, it is necessary that the cartridge contents be agitated immediately before administration to, effect mixing of settled or stratified material throughout the vehicle and provide a homogeneous product for ad: ministration. To facilitate such mbn'ng, it is usual, when charging the medicament into the cartridge, to leave a gas bubble entrapped with the liquid, thus, the volume required for a specific volume of suspension, with its gas bubble, exceeds that which, in a normal solution-filled cartridge, is required to contain an equal liquid volume of medicament. It follows, therefore, that cartridges con,- taining suspension forms of rnedicaments normally exceed in length the cartridges containing an equal liquid volume of other forms of the medicaments. This slight additional cartridge length, in many instances, has prevented use of I such cartridgesinterchangeabiy with standard types'of prior art syringes.

' further disadvantage of these prior art types of hypo:

' dermics'yringes is that they are comprised of a multiplicity of parts, each of which performs merely a single function; 1 hence, necessarily, the syringes are very bulky, weighty and cumbersome to use. The complex and clumsy breech loadingand piston actuating assemblies usually provided on these syringes are especially subject to this criticism, being comprised of a relatively large number of comparatively heavy, massive parts, including spring-pressed latching means and ponderous hinge elements for securing the assembly in operative position at the breech of the syringe barrel, which make the syringe costly to manufacture and, y

from the practical viewpoint of the physician, needlessly heavy and bulky.

Another disadvantage of at least many of the types of syringes heretofore available for use with cartridge pacle aged medicaments is that when they are used with a cartridge of a slightly lesser length than that for which the Fatented May 15,

' the syringe was designed, which easily might occur through accident or inadvertence, the cartridge at best merely intrperfectly engages or, more usually, wholly fails to engage with that end of the .needle provided to pierce the partial closure. When the syringe is being used for administering medicaments that are unsuitable for venous administration, this failure of the syringe can be of great importance because, usually, before administering the medicament, a test is made to assure that the front needle point is at the desired location in tissue, not in a vein, which is done by retracting the syringe plunger and observing if venous blood is drawn into the syringe; then, if the needle point is'deemed to be in the correct position, the piston is forced forward, causing the medicament to be injected into the. patient. It'will be apparent that, if the cartridge becomes disengaged from the needle upon attempted retraction of the cartridge piston, the administering physician has no means of knowing if the needle point is or is not in a vein and, if he acts upon the apparently valid assumption that it is not, when, in fact, it is so positioned, the possibility exists of venous administration of a medicament unsuited for this use, which may be attended with fatal results for the patient.

' One of the chief objects of this invention is to provide a light yet sturdy hypodermic syringe that is comprised of a types now available.

Another object of this invention is to provide a novel form of hypodermic syringe, characterized by simplicity of structure and ease of manufacture, that comprises a new type of disposable, single-dose cartridge asan essential and principal structural and functional element.

A further object of this invention is to provide a novel form of disposable cartridge, suitable for containing single-dose portions of medicaments and the like, adapted to being directly coupled to a double-pointed hypodermic needle, and, when associated with a piston actuating means and a suitable finger grip, to constitute a completely functional hypodermic syringe.

Another object of this invention is to provide a partial closure for disposable, single-dose size, medicament-containing cartridges, provided with means, structurally substantially permanently integrated therewith, to engage with and serve as mounting for a double-pointed hypodermic needle communicating, through said partial closure with the interior of the cartridge.

A further object of this invention is to provide a cartridge type hypodermic syringe in which the cartridge is held in a positive relationship in association with a syringe needle whereby accidental disengagement of the cartridge and needle upon retraction of the cartridge piston is substantially precluded.

Other objects. of the invention will be apparent hereinafter to those skilled in the field to which this invention relates as the detailed description of various presently preferred embodiments of the invention proceeds.

, In accordance with certain aspects of this invention, a disposable cartridge is provided, suitable for containing single dosages of medicaments and the like, comprising an elongate, tubular body portion of substantially uniform bore, thickened and partially constricted near one end and providedthere with an annular groove, formed on the outer surface of the tubular body and adapted to engage with a closure collar element; an imperforate disc, adapted to being easily pierced by a hypodermic needle and formed ofresilient, liquid impervious material, substantially inert toward and insoluble in liquids, solvents and medica ments commonly administered by injection, positioned normal tothe axis of said tubular body portion and overlying the opening in the partially constricted end thereof;

an essentially cylindrical hub element having an axially,

located opening extending therethrough, provided at one end with a radially extending, annular flange, disposed coaxially relative to the tubular body portion with its flanged cud against the outside surface of said disc;.means on said hub element to engage with and support a double-pointed J hypodermic needle with one end of said needle extending through the hub opening and piercing said disc; a closure collar element around the flanged end of said hub element and engaging with the annular groove formed on the tubular body end, pressing the disc therebetween to provide a liquid-tight partial closure at the end of the cartridge; and a movable piston, within the tubular body portion, embracing the walls thereof to provide a liquid-tight closure at the open end of the tubular body portion.

In accordance with certain other aspects of this invention, a hypodermic syringe is provided comprising a disposable cartridge as above described; piston actuating means comprising a plunger member engaging saidpiston V in a manner permitting movement of the piston axially within the tubular body portion .in either direction at choice; an outwardly extending finger grip attachedto the tubular body portion in a manner such that movement syringe, reference now is made to the figures of the accompanying drawing, illustrating certain presently preferred embodiments of this invention, wherein like reference characters or numerals designate the same structural element or feature, and wherein: I v

Figure 1 is substantially a front view, in perspective, of a hypodermic syringe according to the preferred .embodiment of this invention; I

Figure 2 is substantially a longitudinal sectional view of the syringe illustrated in Figure 1, taken along the line 2-2 thereof; v

Figure 3 is substantially a rear elevational view of the v syringe illustrated in the foregoing figures;

Figure 4 is substantially a lateral sectional view of the syringe illustrated in the foregoing figures, taken'along the line 44 of Figure 3;

Figures 5 and 6, respectively, are a partial lateral sec.- tional view and a fragmentary side elevational view of a structurally modified form of the syringe illustrated in the foregoing figures;

Figure 7 is substantially a front elevational view of an-. other structurally modified form of the syringe illustrated in Figures 1 through 4; I

Figures 8, 9 and 10 substantially illustrate alternative plunger elements that may constitute parts of hypodermic syringes embodying the principles of this invention;

Figure 11 is substantially a'front view, .in perspective,'of another embodiment of this invention;

Figures 12 and 13 are fragmentary sectional views of a portion of a syringe according to this invention, illustrating modifications of the needle mounting means;

Figures 14 and 15, respectively, are a fragmentary enlarged detail view and a detail perspective view of an alternative form of cartridge partial closure that may constitute a part of a hypodermic syringe according to this invention;

Figures 16 and 17, respectively,'are a fragmentary en Referring now particularly to Figures 1, 2, 3; and 4 of the drawings, wherein a hypoderic syringe according to the now most preferred embodiment of this invention is illustrated, it will be noticed that the syringe, generally indicated by the reference numeral 30, comprises a medicament-carrying cartridge, generally designated 31, mounted in a fiame, generally indicated by the numeral 32, by means including a needle-carrying ferrule or bushing, generally designated 33, and a cartridge piston actuating means, generally indicated by the reference numeral 34.

The medicament-carrying cartridge 31 comprises an essentially straight, tubular body portion 40 of substantially uniform bore, which may be a length of ordinary glass tubing, open at one end and terminating, at its opposite end 41 in a somewhat thickened and partially constricted formation 42, provided, on its outer surface, with an annular groove 43. An imperforate disc 44, formed of resilient, liquid impervious, easily pierced material, capable of being sterilized and substantially inert toward and insoluble in liquids, solvents and medicaments normally parenterally administered by injection, is positioned against the thickened end portion 42 of the cartridge body 40, susbtantially as shown. It will be understood that this disc, which is held tightly against the cartridge body by means to be hereinafter described, serves as a so-called partial closure for the medicament-containing cartridge, and that the disc is formed of a material so selected to admit of being pierced readily by a hypodermic needle for purposes of withdrawing medicament from the cartridge chamber, as will be described later. Among the materials that may be used for this purpose and from which the disc may be fabricated readily are natural or synthetic sheet rubber, sheeted synthetic rubber-like elastomers, composite laminated sheets comprising the foregoing and which may include a metal foil layer in the laminate, and the like. It will be understood that the thickness and other dimensions of the disc are such that itmay be readily pierced by a needle when positioned at the cartridge mouth without being forced into the cartridge interior thereby.

A substantially cylindrical hub element having an axially located opening formed therein and extending therethrough, provided with an integral, radially extending, annular flanged end portion 46 and with threading 47 extending along its shank portion, is positioned coaxially relative to the tubular body portion 40 with its flanged end portion against the outer face of the disc 44, essentially as shown, and a substantially tubular closure collar element 48, turned in at its ends, is disposed around the flanged end portion 46 of the hub 45, around the disc 44 and the end portion 41 of the tubular cartridge body 40, being seated in and engaged with the annular groove 43 formed therein, whereby these parts are held together firmly and permanently under compressive forces providing a liquid-tight closure across the mouth of the cartridge.

The frame 32, preferably formed of bent, stamped sheet metal, is of a generally T-shaped configuration, comprising an elongate body portion 59, provided with a longitudinally extending bent-up strengthening rib 51, terminating at one end in a first pierced lug 52, integrally formed with the frame body portion and extending across the end thereof, disposed substantially normal to the body portion 50. At the opposite end of the frame body portion 50, two integrally formed, oppositely extending arms 53 and 54 are provided, bent-up at the bottoms thereof to present finger grips 55 and 56, respectivley, substantially as shown, and, intermediate the tops of these arms, a second pierced lug 57 is provided, also disposed normal to the frame body and extending in the same directional sense as the first pierced lug, the openings in said lugs being substantially aligned relative to an axis essentially parallel to the frame body portion.

Two facing, oppositely bent lugs 58 and 59, integrally formed with the frame body portion 50 and extending from the frame in the same directional sense as the pierced lugs 52 and 57, are provided near the frame arms, essentially as shown. Each of these lugs 58 and 59 is provided, near its distal end portion, with a reverse bend to facilitate its gripping and embracing of the cartridge body as will now be described. The medicament-carrying cartridge 31 is placed in the frame 32 with the threaded shank portion 47 of the hub element extending through the opening in the first pierced lug 52, and with the lugs 53 and 59 embracing the opposite or distal end of the cartridge body, essentially as shown. It will be understood that, when so positioned, the longitudinal dimensions and proportions of the frame body are such that there is adequate spacing between the second pierced lug 57 and the near end of the medicament-carrying cartridge to allow adequate accommodation of cartridges of substantially differing lengths and containing substantially different volumes of medicament.

The needle, generally indicated by the reference numeral 33, comprises an elongate, tubular cannula 60, pointed at both its ends, 61 and 62, to facilitate piercing epidermal flesh and the cartridge partial closure disc 44, respectively, rigidly mounted, at a position intermediate its ends, in an internally threaded ferrule or bushing 63, which is received on and engages with the threaded shank portion 47 of the needle hub element 45, essentially as shown in Figures 1, 2 and 3 of the drawings. It will be observed that engagement of the needle-carrying ferrule 63 with the needle hub element 45, while a portion of the needle or cannula end is positioned within the axially extending bore or opening in the hub element results in the needle end portion 62 being caused to pierce the disc 44, whereby the medicament in the cartridge may be discharged through the needle. Also, when these elements of the syringe according to this invention are thus interengaged, the needle and the cartridge, in effect, are structurally integrated with the frame, assuring rigidity of the needle relative both to the frame and the cartridge, and, further, assuring that longitudinal axial motion of the cartridge relative to the needle or the frame effectively will be precluded.

The cartridge piston actuating means 34 comprises a rod-like shaft or plunger element 65, freely slidably mounted in the opening formed in the second pierced lug 57, terminating, at one end, in a hand grip or head formation 66 and, at its opposite end, in a piston-engaging formation 67, provided with an internally threaded, axially extending opening capable of being threadably engaged with a stud 68, provided with mating threading, axially mounted in and extending outward from the piston 69, substantially as shown. The engagement of the plunger end portion 67 with the piston stud is such, it will be noticed, that the piston may be moved axially within the cartridge in either direction at:-.choic e. It will be understood that the-piston 69, which may be formed of rubber or other material-having the char:

acteristics set forth above in connection with the description of the disc 44, tightly embraces the interior walls of the cartridge body portion 49, whereby it eifects a liquidtight closure thereof, and that motion of the piston axially within the cartridge body toward the needle-bearing end of the cartridgev can cause medicment within the cartridge to be expelled therefrom through the needle.

It is to be noticed, in connection with this embodiment of the present invention, that, as both end portions of the cartridge are connected to or engaged with elements of the frame, and the plunger rod 65, slidably mounted in an opening in a lug also constituting an element of the frame, is coupled with the piston in a manner precluding movement except along the axis of the cartridge, the elements of the syringe coact to provide an instrument allowing of delicate manipulation and affording the user constant, positive control throughout the injection of the medicament.

I -.Referring now particularly to Figures and 6 of the drawing, it,--willbe noticed that herea modifiedform of means for strucutrally integrating the needle-bearing car- .tridge end with the frame is illustrated in fragmentary views wherein merely these portions of the syringe are represented. In this modification, which functionallyis substantially the equivalent of the first lug 52 in the firstdescribed embodiment of the invention, a pair of facing arms, 70 and 71, is provided upon and integrally formed with the frame end portion 72, the ,armsbeing bent back at their distal end portions 7% and 71a, respectively, to assist in gripping and tightly embracing the cartridge end portion, generally indicated by the reference'numeral 73, essentially as shown. It is to be observed, particularly, in this modified form of the syringe according to this invention, that the arms are so proportioned and shaped that theygrip the cartridgeend in the vicinity of .the

annulargroove formed in the syringe body, thereby ef- Figure 7 of the drawing, may be readily engaged with ,the users fingers, thereby facilitating its operation. grip nated 79, all substantially in the manner'and for the vpurposes described hereinabove in connection with that em: bodiment of this invention which is illustrated in Figures 1, 2, 3 and 4 of the drawing. Also in like manner, this modified form of syringe is provided with a cartridge piston actuating means, generally designated 89, comprising a plunger rodSLslidably mounted in a second pierced lug 82, provided on the frame 78, and engaging with a piston within the near cartridge end portion, for the purposesand with the results that have been set forth above when describing the other embodiment of this invention. 'However, in this modified embodiment of'the invention, the frame 78 is provided with two essentiallyflat, integral annular formations, 83 and 84, located intertion of the cartridge piston is necessary, as this form of grip may be engaged with the users fingers, thereby permitting one-hand operation of'the instrument.

V mediate the first and second piercedlugs, 77 and 82, respectively, disposed in substantially a common plane with the frame body portion 78 and extending in opposite di- In Figures 8, 9 and 10, three structural modifications of the cartridge piston actuating means are represented. The means represented in Figure 8 is substantially that utilized in those embodiments of this invention that have been described above, and comprises a rod-like shaft 99,

terminating, at one end, in a radially enlarged formation that it will be with the syringe frame Iwhen neededfor use.

The piston actuating means illustrated in Figure 9 of the drawing is a modification of that above described and I it comprises a rod-like shaft 95, provided with a threaded opening 96"at one end for engagement with a' cartridge. piston stud, and at its opposite end, being provided with an integrally formed, radially extending, disc-like hand I grip, substantially as shown. This modified form of hand syrings elements are illustrated. v

120, sharply pointed at its ends 121 and 122 and progrip, it;willjbe noticed, not-provided. withastop formation at thejpiston engaging end, hence it may be withdrawn freely from its engagement witha pierced lug v in which it may be mounted; s

The modified hand grip structure represented in Figure 10 is particularly suited for use in syringes; intended .to be employed in the administration of viscous liquidscor in instances where it is necessary to move the piston alter-v nately in opposite'directions as a normal incident of ad:

ministratiomfor this grip, and especially when itisaused in conjunction with the type of finger grip shown in comprises a rod-like shaft element 98,'provided, at" one end, with'a threaded opening'99 for engagement with a like-threaded stud on a cartridge piston, and, at its opposite end, with a'grip 100, generally annular in form and connected to the, shaft by suitable means such .as an interengaging threading 10 1. a I I The alternative embodiment of the hypodermic syringe according to this invention illustrated in Figurell, be cause of its extreme simplicity ofstructure, is of major commercial significance.v .This embodiment of the invention comprises acartridge, generally designated 110, terminating in a partial closure, generally indicated by the reference numeral 111, bearing a double-pointed hypodermic needle assembly 112,.rigidly mounted. uponlan outwardly extending stud element forming a part of the partial closure; Suitable cartridgepi ston actuating means, engaged with a piston, is provided, of which -merely: a plunger shaft 113 is shown, part of which is broken off to facilitate clearness of illustration. It will be understood that all of these elements of the syringe may be substantially as described above in connectionv with the 114 is comprised of an annular structure, attached tothe cartridge end distal from the partial closure, having a relatively substantial radial thicknessand being, also, of adequate thickness axially to serve its intended purpose. This annular fingergrip maybe attached to the cartridge barrel by suitable adhesive or the like,-or it may be retained in its operative position by force-fitting it in place, then depending upon coacting frictional and compressive forces to retain it in its position. Regardless of the manner whereby the finger grip is attached to the barrel, it will be understood thatit is attached in a manner that substantially precludes relative axial movement of. these two syringe members under those conditions ordinarily encountered during use of the syringe.

Reference now is made to Figures 12 and 13 of the drawing wherein alternative means for supporting the hypodermic needle in functional relationship to the other vided with a bead 123 rigidly mounted on and, permanently attached to the cannula at a location intermediate its ends, is shown engaged with its mounting means. The

mounting means comprises a plurality of axially extending, coacting resilient fingers, two of which are designated 124 and 125, integrally formed with a hub element 126, which is provided with a flanged endlportion 127 and which has an axially located opening extending therethrough. The needle is engaged with its mounting means by introducing the needle end 121 into the opening formed in the hub element, then forcing it further into thej-hub until the fingers are firmly frictionally engaged with the bead carried on the cannula, substantially as shown. It

will be understood that when utilizing this modifiedform of double-pointed needle and needle mounting means in a hypodermic syringe according to this invention, the hub element 126, unassociated with the needle, is substituted for the hub element of the cartridge partial closure; i. e., for the hub element 45 in that embodiment of the invention that. is illustrated in Figure 2 of the drawing and I In Figure 13, a cannula 9 described above. When it is desired to use a so-modified type of syringe, the needle is positioned with its end in the opening of the hub, then it is pushed axially toward the piston bearing end of the cartridge, causing its near pointed end to pierce the disc element of the partial closme and, also, causing the needle bead to spread the resilient finger portions of the hub and be firmly frictionally embraced and held thereby. g

In the modified form of needle mounting means illus trated, in a fragmentary sectional view, by Figure 12 of the drawing, a cartridge end portion, generally designated 13 is-provided with a partial closure, generally indicated by the reference numeral 131, comprising a flanged, axially bored, hub element 132, tapered along its outer surface 133, upon which is received, in frictional engagement therewith, a similarly but reversely tapered cap or ferrule 134, bearing a double-pointed hypodermic needle 135. The manner whereby the needle end is passed through the hub bore andc'aused to pierce the resilient disc element of the partial closure on the cartridge, and the ferrule is frictionally engaged with the tapered shank .of the hub element will be obvious without detailed dc.- scripti'on.

Referring-now to Figures 14 through 21 of the drawing, yarious modifications of the cartridge partial closure elements will now be described, it being understood that any of these modified closures, at choice, may be substituted for the partial closures above described without departure from this invention.

The modified closure represented in Figures 14 and 15 of the drawings, represented here in position upon an end portion of a cartridge body 141}, comprises a hub element 141, disposed coaxially relative to the cartridge axis, a resilient disc element 142 interposed between the end of the cartridge body and a flanged end portion of the hub element, and a collar 143, disposed around and engaging the flanged portion of the hulnelement and being provided with axially extending petals that may be bent inwardly to engage with an annular groove formed in the end portion of the cartridge body, whereby the disc is caused to press against and seal the end of the cartridge, substantially as shown. It will b'ennderstood, of course, that in this representation of this modified closure in Figure 14 of the drawing, and this is true, also, of the closure modifications represented in Figures 16, 18 and 20, hereinafter described, merely the point of the needle piercing the disc is shown, the remainder of the needle, the ferrule upon which it is carried and even a portion of the hub element, in each instance, being omitted for clearance of illustration.

The modified partial closure shown in Figures 16 and 17, comprising an end portion 150 of a cartridge body, a hub element 151, a resilient member 152, and a collar 153fwhich engages the flanged hub end and presses it, with the disc therebetween, against the end of the cartridge body, differs from the partial closure modifications above described in that the resilient member is formed in a cup shape that it may the better seal the cartridge end and provide a larger area under pressure of the collar member than is provided by a disc-shaped resilient element.

The modified partial closure represented in Figures 18 and 19 of the drawing, shown in position upon an end portion of a cartridge body 160, comprises a resilient disc 161, which may be thickened at its marginal portions as indicated in Figure 19, a hub element 162 resting against the disc, and a collar member 163, engaging a flanged end portion of the hub element, pressing the resilient disc against the end of the cartridge body to seal the same, and engaging annular grooves or threading formed on the surface of the cartridge body, whereby the closure is maintained tightly sealed despite rough handling of the cartridge. This type of closure is especially advantageous for use in instances where the integrity of the partial seal must be maintained against abuse in the hantiling of the cartridge oragainst extremely powerful forces acting upon the liquid medium within the cartridge, for instance, when the medicament is a viscous liquid requiring high pressure to force it through the fine bore of the needle. The advantage of this closure is that it affords a cartridge body 170, comprises a hub element 171, a

resilient disc member 172 and a collar member 173 which, embracing a flanged end portion of the hub element, presses said element, and the disc therebetween, against the end of the cartridge body, essentially as shown. It will be noticed that the collar member, in this modified form of partial closure, engages with cam-like formations on the cartridge body, whereby the elements and members are pressed together tightly to provide the desired liquid-tight seal at the cartridge end.

It is again to be emphasized that the novel hypodermic syringes according to this invention, by reason of their simplicity of structure and the manner in which the syringe elements coact to provide all needed functions with a minimum of structure, are especially suited to mass-production by automatic machinery such as now is used for making disposable cartridges of the ordinary types, and, under these conditions, the complete syringe is inappreciably more costly to make than the cartridges, hence, too, they are disposable.

Having thus described the subject matter of this invention, What it is desired to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. A disposable hypodermic syringe comprising: (1) a cartridge that comprises an elongate tubular body of substantially uniform bore, open at one end, partially constricted and provided with an annular grooved formation on the outer surface near the other end thereof; a piston, positioned within the open end of the tubular body and capable of movement axially therein, engaging the inner walls thereof to provide an essentially liquid-tight closure therefor; and a partial closure at the opposite end of the tubular body, said partial closure comprising a disc-shaped member, formed of resilient material capable of being pierced by a needle, adapted to overlie the opening of the partially constricted end portion of the tubular body; an essentially cylindrical hub element having an opening extending axially therethrough, provided with a radially extending flanged portion at one end thereof and, at the other, with means for engaging and supporting a doublepointed hypodermic needle While one end of said needle is positioned in the axially extending opening and projects therethrough from the flanged end thereof, said hub element being adapted to being positioned with its flanged end portion against the resilient member and its axis substantially coincident with the axis of the body portion of the cartridge; and a collar member, disposed around the flanged end portion of the hub element, the resilient disc-shaped member and the tubular body end portion in engagement with the annular grooved formation thereon, pressing these parts axially together, whereby the resilient member is held as a liquid-tight seal against the end of the tubular body; (2) a double-pointed hypodermic needle engaged with and supported on said hub element with one end thereof extending through the axial opening therein and piercing said disc-shaped resilient member; (3) piston actuating means engaged with said piston and permitting controlled axial motion of the piston in either direction at choice; and (4) a finger grip member, located near the open end of the tubular cartridge and attached to the cartridge in a manner substantially precluding axial movement of the cartridge relative to the finger grip member. a

2. A disposable hypodermic syringe comprising: (1) a cartridge that comprises an elongate tubular body of substantially uniform bore, open at one end, partially constricted and provided with-an annular grooved formation on the outer surface near the otherend thereof; a piston, positioned within the open end of the tubular body and capable of movement axially therein, engaging the inner walls thereof to provide an essentially liquidtight closure therefor; and a partial closure at the opposite end of the tubular body, said partial closure comprising a disc-shaped member, formed of resilient material capable of being pierced by a. needle, adapted to overlie the opening at' the partially constricted end portion of the tubular body; an essentially cylindrical hub element "having an opening extending axially therethrough, provided with a radially extending flanged portion at one end thereof and at'the other, with means for engaging and supporting a double-pointed hypodermic needle While one end of said needle is positioned in the axially extending opening and projects therethrough from the flanged end thereof, said hub element being adapted to being positioned with its flanged end portion against the resilient member and its axis substantially coincident with that of-the tubular body; and

a collar member of tubular metal, at one end disposed around and bent in to engage with the flanged end portion of the hub element lying against the disc-shaped member, at the other end disposed around the end of'i the tubular body and bent in .to engage the annular grooved formation thereon, pressing these parts axially 1 together, whereby the resilient member is held as a liquidtight seal against the end of the tubular body; (2) a double-pointed hypodermic needle engaged .with and sup- I ported on said hub element with one end thereof extend ing through the axial opening therein and piercing said disc-shaped resilient member; (3) piston actuating means engaged with said piston and permitting controlled axial motion of the piston in either direction at choice; and

(4) a finger, grip member, located near the openend of the tubular body portion of the cartridge and attached to the cartridge ,in a manner substantially. precluding axial movement of the cartridge relative to the finger grip member. I 1 r 3; A disposable hypodermic syringe comprising: (1) a cartridge that comprises an elongate tubular glass body of substantially uniform bore, open at one end, partially constrictedland provided with an annular grooved for- A mation on the outer surface nearthe other end thereof; a .piston, positioned within the open end of the tubular body and capable of movement axially therein, engaging the inner walls thereof to provide an essentially liquid-tight closure therefor; and a partial closure at the opposite end'of. the tubular body, said partial closure comprising a disc-shaped member, formed of resilient, rubber-like material capable of being pierced by a needle, adapted to overlie the opening at the partially constricted end portion'of the tubular body; an essentially cylindrical hub element having an openin'gxextending axially therethrough, provided with a radially extending flanged portionat one end'thereof and at the other end, with means for engaging and supporting a double-pointed hypodermic needle while one end of said needle is posi tioned in the axially extending opening and projects therethrough from the flanged end thereof, said hub element being adapted to beingpositioned with its flanged end portion against the resilient member and its axis substantially coincident with that of the tubular body;

1 and a collar member of tubular metal, at one end dis-.

posed around and bent in to engage with the flanged end portion of the hubelement lying against'the discshaped member, at the other end disposed around the end of the tubular body and bent in to engage the annular grooved formation thereon, pressing these parts axially together, whereby the resilient member is held as a liquid-tight seal against the end of the tubular body; (2) a double-pointed. hypodermic needle engaged with and supportedflon said hub element with one end thereof 12 extending through the axial opening therein and piercing said; disc-shaped resilient member; (3) piston; actuating means engaged with saidpiston and permitting controlled axial motion of the piston in either direction at choice;

and (4) a finger grip member, located near the openend of the tubular cartridge body and attached to the cartridge in a manner substantially precluding axial movement of the cartridge relative to the finger grip member. p

4. A disposable hypodermic syringe cartridge thatcomprises an elongate tubular body of substantially uniform bore, open at one .end, partially constricted and provided with an annular grooved formation on its outer surface near the other end thereof; a piston, positioned within the openend of, the tubularbody and capable of movement axially therein, engaging the inner walls thereof to provide an essentially liquid-tightclosuretherefor; and a partial closure at the opposite end of .the tubular body,

said partial closure comprising a'disc-shapedmember,

formed of resilient material capable of being piercedreadily by a needle, adapted to overlie the opening at th'e par.-

tially constricted end portion "of the tubularbody; an

essentially cylindrical hub element having an opening'extending axially therethrou' gh, provided with a radially extending flanged portion atone end and, at the other end, with means for engaging with and supporting a doublepointed hypodermic needle while one end of said needle is positioned in the axially extending opening and projects therethrough from the flanged end thereof, said hub element being adapted to being positioned with its'flanged end portion against the resilient member and with its axis substantially coincident with the longitudinal axis of the tubular body; and a collar member, disposed around the I flanged end portion of the hub element, the resilient discshaped member and the tubular body end portion in engagement with the annular grooved formation thereon, pressing these parts together axially whereby the resilient member-is held'against the end of the .tubular body to 6 provide a liquid-tight seal therefor.

ily by a needle, adapted to overlie the opening at the I partially constricted end portion of the vtubularbody; an 7 essentially cylindrical hub element having an opening extending axially therethrough, provided with a radially extending flanged portion at one end and, at the other end, with means for engaging with and supporting a double-pointed hypodermic needle while one end of said needle is positioned in the axially extending opening and projects therethrough from-the flanged end thereof, said hub element being adapted to being positioned'with its flanged end portion against the resilient member and with its axis substantially coincident With the longitudinal axis of the tubular. body; and a collar member of tubular metal, at one end disposed around and bent in to engage with the flanged end of the hub element lying against the resilient disc-shaped member, at the other end disposed around the end .of the tubular body and bent in to engage the annular grooved formation thereon, pressing these parts axially together whereby the resilient member is held against the end of the tubular body to providega liquid-tight seal therefor. a

6. A disposable hypodermic syringe cartridge that com prises an elongate, tubular glass body of substantially uniform bore, open "at one end, partially'constricted and provided with an annular grooved formation on its outer surface near the other end thereof; a piston, positioned within the open end of the tubular body and capable of movement axially therein, engaging the inner walls thereof to provide an essentially liquid-tight closure therefor; and a partial closure at the opposite end of the tubular body, said partial closure comprising a disc-shaped member, formed of resilient, rubber-like material capable of being pierced readily by a needle, adapted to overlie the opening at the partially constricted end portion of the tubular body; an essentially cylindrical huh element having an opening extending axially therethrough, provided with a radially extending flanged portion at one end and, at the other end, with means for engaging with and supporting a double-pointed hypodermic needle while one end of said needle is positioned in the axially extending opening and projects therethrough from the flanged end thereof, said hub element being adapted to being positioned with its flanged end portion against the resilient member and with its axis substantially coincident with the longitudinal axis of the tubular body; and a collar member of tubular metal, at one end disposed around and bent in to engage with the flanged end of the hub element lying against the resilient disc-shaped member, at the other end disposed around the end of the tubular body and bent in to engage the annular grooved formation thereon, pressing these parts axially together whereby the resilient member is held against the end of the tubular body to provide a. liquid-tight seal therefor.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2828742 *May 2, 1957Apr 1, 1958American Home ProdCartridge-needle unit
US2859750 *Feb 10, 1956Nov 11, 1958Pfizer & Co CHypodermic syringe
US2859751 *Feb 10, 1956Nov 11, 1958Pfizer & Co CHypodermic syringe
US2890698 *Jan 29, 1954Jun 16, 1959Sloane Theodore SHypodermic syringe and collapsible cartridge assembly
US3076455 *Dec 19, 1958Feb 5, 1963Milton J CohenHolder for hypodermic syringe cartridges
US3080866 *Jul 7, 1961Mar 12, 1963Friedman BenjaminHypodermic needle
US3167072 *Oct 11, 1962Jan 26, 1965Stone Hester EllenIntravenous needle and flow tube stabilizing means
US3348545 *Oct 22, 1964Oct 24, 1967SarnoffLatched cartridge
US3930492 *Aug 21, 1974Jan 6, 1976Jintan Terumo Company, Ltd.Air-noncontact type blood sampling assembly
US5389083 *Sep 28, 1993Feb 14, 1995Jrm Enterprises, Inc.Guards for hypodermic needle
US5531706 *Mar 18, 1994Jul 2, 1996Protecs Syringes International CorporationSafety syringe
US5716348 *Oct 19, 1995Feb 10, 1998Meridian Medical Technologies, Inc.Anti-coring needle
US7544189Mar 11, 2004Jun 9, 2009Meridian Medical Technologies, Inc.Needle and hub assembly for automatic injector
US7569035Nov 2, 2001Aug 4, 2009Meridian Medical Technologies, Inc.Automatic injector with anti-coring needle
US7757370Apr 29, 2009Jul 20, 2010Meridian Medical Technologies, Inc.Methods of forming a needle and hub assembly for automatic injectors
DE1169614B *Sep 30, 1959May 6, 1964Stanley Jay SarnoffSpritzgestell
DE1272489B *Dec 11, 1959Jul 11, 1968American Home ProdInjektionsspritze mit einer auswechselbaren Spritzampulle
WO2005087297A1 *Mar 10, 2005Sep 22, 2005Steven M GriffithsNeedle and hub assembly for automatic injector
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/206, 604/227, 604/232
International ClassificationA61M5/24
Cooperative ClassificationA61M2005/2414, A61M5/3137, A61M5/24, A61M5/28
European ClassificationA61M5/24