Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2746703 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 22, 1956
Filing dateAug 25, 1953
Priority dateAug 25, 1953
Publication numberUS 2746703 A, US 2746703A, US-A-2746703, US2746703 A, US2746703A
InventorsEmery Victor W
Original AssigneeEmery Victor W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Portable and collapsible barrel rack
US 2746703 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 2, 1956 v. w. EMERY PORTABLE AND COLLAPSIBLE BARREL RACK Filed Aug. 25, 1953 m T. m w.

l/lc 7-02 W Ems-2V BY 3 )%%M)@mm -AOMm ATTORNEY? United SW aten 2,746,703 PORTABLE AND COLLAPSIBLE BARREL RACK Victor W. Emery, New Castle, Pa. Application August 25, 1953, Serial No. 376,325

2 Claims. (Cl. 248-150) v This invention relates to an, improved portable and collapsible barrel rack, and the primary object of the invention is to provide a lightweight more eflicient and practical device of this character, which, while being composed of simple and relatively light gauge parts, affords reliable and rigid support for a barrel, and is especially suitable for use by operators of automobile trailers and the like, for supporting a 50 or 55 lb. oil barrel or drum on the ground or other surface to supply fuel for cooking and heating purposes.

Another important object of the invention is to provide a device of the character indicated above which is especially constructed to be quickly and easily collapsible so as to be capable of being stored and transported in a small or confined space, such as in an automobile trunk compartment or in a trailer, the device being capable of being knocked down or collapsed intoone or more bundles of small compass and of being collapsedor crossed diagonal brace bars 16, 16 are separably bolted knocked down in such a way that portions of the device serve as carrying handles for other portions of the device.

Other important objects and advantageous features of the invention will be apparent from the following description and the accompanying drawings, wherein, for the purposes of illustration only, a specific embodiment of the invention is set forth in detail.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of a barrel rack in set up position in accordance with the present invention;

Figure 2 is a side elevation thereof, a barrel being shown in dotted lines in position on the rack;

Figure 3 is an end elevation, taken from the left in Figure 2; and

Figure 4 is a vertical longitudinal section, taken on the line 44 of Figure 3 Referring in detail to the drawings, wherein like numerals designate like parts throughout the several views, the illustrated barrel rack is generally designated 7 and the associated conventional oil barrel or drum 8.

The rack 7 comprises a collapsible and demountable frame having two sides each composed of two crossed angle iron inner and outer legs 9 and 10 respectively. The inner legs 9 are located at the laterally inward sides of the outer legs 10, with the vertical flanges 11 and 12, respectively, of these legs engaged with each other. A combined spreader rod and pivot bolt or spindle 13 extends between the frame sides and has threaded ends 13' passing through holes provided in the vertical flanges of the pairs of legs at the points of their intersections. Stops 14, 14, which may be in the form of nuts threaded on the spindle ends 13 are spaced from the terminals of the ends and bear against the laterally inward sides of the vertical flanges 11 of the inner legs 9 so as to space the frame sides apart at the proper distance. Other nuts 15 are threaded on the spindle ends 13' against the laterally outward sides of the vertical flanges 12 of the outer legs 10 so as to assemble the legs of each pair relative to each other and to the other pair of legs. Similar at-their upper and lower ends as indicated at 17 and 18, to upper and lower end portions of the horizontal or lateral flanges 19, 19 of the inner frame side legs 9, 9 respectively, so as to hold the frame sides parallel to and rigid with respect to each other. The brace bars are engaged only with the upper .sides of the horizontal or lateral flanges 19, 19 of the inner legs 9 ofthe pairs of legs.

Similar angle iron side rails 20, 20 having vertical flanges 21 and laterally inwardly projecting horizontal or lateral'flanges 22, extend between the upper ends of each pair of legs. As shown in Figure l, the vertical flanges 21 of the rails 20. are engaged with the laterally outward sides of the vertical flanges 11 of the inner legs and with the laterally inward sides of the vertical flanges 12 ofthe outer legs, 10, at the upper ends of the legs, where bolts 23 and 24, respectively, traverse the vertical flanges of the legs and the vertical flange 21 of the rails 20, at the opposite ends of the rails.

Arcuate barrel cradling bands 25 extend between the rails 20, 20 at the opposite ends of the rails and have cars 26, 26 on their ends which rest upon the horizontal flanges 22 of the rails, and bolts 27, 27 and 28, 28, respectively, traverse the opposite end portions of the rail flanges 22 and the ears 26, 26 and secure the bands. 25 in place, with the curvatures of the bands extending below the rails 20, 20 for receiving a barrel 8, in the manner shown in dotted lines in Figures 2 and 3. It is to be observed that the bands, being preferably rigid, like the brace, bars 16, 16 and the legs 9, 9, and 10, 10 add tothe rigidity and strengthof'. the device when in assembled condition, and that these parts can be of relatively light gauge material without sacrifice of adequate strength and stability. While I have shown the parts as being made of metal, it is also intended that they can be made of other suitable material, such as wood.

For use on rough or unfirm ground or other surface, and to prevent penetration of such a surface by the lower ends of the legs, and to lend further rigidity to the structure described above, I provide a pair of similar base bars 29, 29, which are preferably in the form of metal angle irons, but can be of wood or of other suitable material. As illustrated in the drawings, the base bars have lower edges 30, 30 to rest upon the ground. At the proper distance apart and near the ends of the bars 29, notches 32, 32 set at the proper opposite angles are provided in the upper edges of the bars 29 to receive the lower ends 33, 34 of the lateral flanges of the inner and outer legs 9 and 10 of the rack frame sides, in an arrangement in which the vertical flanges 11 of the inner legs 9 engage the laterally outward sides of the base bars and the vertical flanges 12 of the outer legs 10 engage the laterally inward sides of the base bars 29. In this way, with lower edges 39, 30 of the base bars 29, 29 frictionally engaged with the ground, the rack 7 is prevented from shifting relative to the base bars in any horizontal direction.

The above described barrel rack may be demounted or collapsed for carrying and for storage in several different ways, depending upon the convenience of the user and the nature of the storage space available.

One way is to disconnect the lower ends of the brace bars 16, 16 from the inner legs 9, 9, remove the assembling nuts 15 from the ends 13 of the spindle 13, and disconnect the same ends of the cradle bands 25 from a rail 20. Thereupon the two frame sides may be superimposed upon each other to form a flat package to be laid upon the floor of an automobile trunk compartment or the like.

Another way is to go beyond the foregoing way to the .raenea May 22, less extent of diseonneoting both. cradle bands 25 at both nd fm bath. s dera 2.0... 2.0 and. hen. econnect each cradle band at its ends, by means of the bolts 27, 27 and 28, 28, to a side rail 20, with the bands 25 extending along the side. rails with the curvatures of the bands 25. extending upwardly fromtheside rails 20, in the manner ofbail handles, which can then be used to. manually carry the collapsed device.

When it. is further desired to make an elongated package of the smallest cross section or width, the upper ends of one leg of each pair is disconnected from one end of the siderails 20, 20 so that the legs9 and 10, of each pair can be collapsed into side by side relation.

What is claimed is:

1. In a. collapsible. and; portable. rack, two pairs of crossed and pivoted legs, a spreader bar extending between the pairs of legs having ends pivotally traversing the legs at the points of-intersection' of the legs, said legs having upper ends, side rails extending betweenthelegs of each pair at the upper ends. of the legs, said side rails being angular in. cross section and having horizontal longitudinal flangesv extending laterally inwardly of the pairs of legs and toward. each other and depending vertical flanges, said horizontal: flanges overlying the upper ends of the legs, said. pairs. of legs having laterally outward sides along which the vertical flanges of the side rails depend, said vertical flanges having laterally inward sides, means pivotally securing the upper ends of the legs to the laterally inward sides. of said vertical flanges, and cradle bands. extending between said side rails and secured at their ends to the horizontal flanges of the side rails, the securing means ofat least one legof each pair comprising means providing for separation thereof fromthe related side rails.

22. In a collapsible. and portable rack, two pairs of crossed and pivoted legs,- aspreader barextending between the pairs of legs having ends pivotally traversing the legs. at the points. of intersection of the legs, said legs having upper ends, side rails extending between the legs of each pair at the upper ends of the legs, said side rails being angular in cross section and having horizontal longitudinal flanges extending laterally inwardly of the pairs of legs and toward each other and depending vertical flanges, said horizontal flanges. overlying the upper ends of the legs, said pairs of legs having laterally outward sides along which the vertical flanges of the side rails depend, said vertical flangeshaving laterally inward sides, means pivotally securing the upper ends of the legs to the laterally inward sides of said vertical flanges, and cradle bands extending between said side rails and secured at their ends to the horizontal flanges of the side rails, the securing means of at least one leg of each pair comprising means providing for separation thereof from the related side rails, two of said cradle bands being secured at their ends to the horizontal flanges of the rails, with the cradle band ends overlying the horizontal flanges.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Green Nov. 15, 1949

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US310877 *Jan 20, 1885F oneDavid n
US438630 *Jan 17, 1890Oct 21, 1890 Support for hammocks or beds
US921855 *Mar 25, 1908May 18, 1909Harry K LoskampBarrel-support.
US1094227 *Aug 19, 1913Apr 21, 1914Ellis A LotzFolding stand.
US1214086 *Feb 19, 1916Jan 30, 1917Hamilton S WallaceStove.
US1289247 *Aug 19, 1918Dec 31, 1918H D Beach CompanyCollapsible table.
US1360912 *Nov 14, 1919Nov 30, 1920Felix FolmarClothes-horse
US1434777 *Mar 8, 1922Nov 7, 1922Sigmond HandlerAdjustable seat
US1597548 *Aug 16, 1924Aug 24, 1926Panay Horizontal Show Jar CompDisplay device
US1856977 *Nov 27, 1929May 3, 1932Swen M SwenssonFolding desk and chair
US1860879 *Dec 10, 1928May 31, 1932Weston Paper And Mfg CompanyDisplay stand
US2488010 *Sep 3, 1946Nov 15, 1949Green Frank MTray holder
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2921695 *Mar 20, 1958Jan 19, 1960Sudbery Carl HFoldable bundle wrapping rack
US4040521 *Sep 22, 1976Aug 9, 1977The Raymond Lee Organization, Inc.Elements for supporting wheels above ground and device for connecting the elements
US4175666 *Apr 3, 1978Nov 27, 1979Kleen-Rite, Inc.Tank support assemblies
US4875302 *Apr 7, 1988Oct 24, 1989Noffsinger Alfred ACollapsible display sign
US5370245 *Jun 11, 1993Dec 6, 1994The Bottle Buddy, Inc.Water cooler bottle storage stand and system
US6135297 *Mar 31, 1999Oct 24, 2000Eureka Water CompanyBottle storage and transportation rack
US6523706 *Mar 8, 2002Feb 25, 2003Sagarte, S.A.Support for casks
US6536612 *Mar 8, 2002Mar 25, 2003Sagarte, S.A.Support for casks
US6591991 *Aug 6, 2001Jul 15, 2003Luce BelleCollapsible tire stand
US7111811 *Apr 30, 2004Sep 26, 2006Pla-Cor IncorporatedHopper stand
US7168666 *Dec 22, 2003Jan 30, 2007Tucker Timothy RPortable support structure
US20120152870 *Aug 25, 2010Jun 21, 2012Aims International, Inc.Systems and methods for supporting tubular members
DE1191543B *Apr 21, 1959Apr 22, 1965Victor GresserTraggeruest zur Aufhaengung eines waagerecht angeordneten zylindrischen Behaelters, insbesondere fuer Bier oder Most
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/150, 211/195
International ClassificationA47B81/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47B81/007
European ClassificationA47B81/00E