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Publication numberUS2746824 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 22, 1956
Filing dateApr 22, 1954
Priority dateApr 22, 1954
Publication numberUS 2746824 A, US 2746824A, US-A-2746824, US2746824 A, US2746824A
InventorsScott R Bond
Original AssigneeH K Lorentzen Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shock-resistant case and seal therefor
US 2746824 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 22, 1956 s. R. BOND SHOCK-RESISTANT CASE AND SEAL THEREFOR 2 Sheets-Shoat 1 Filed April 22, 1954 INVENTOR SCOTT R. BOND ATTORNEYS May 22, 1956 s. R. BOND SHOCK-RESiSTANT CASE AND SEAL THEREFOR 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed April 22, 1954 \NVENTOR SCOTT R, BOND FIG] BY M M r7444,

HIS ATTORNEYS United States Patent Office 2,746,824 Patented May 22, 1956 SHOCK-RESISTANT CASE AND SEAL THEREFOR Scott R. Bond, North Plalnfield, N. 1., asslgnor to H. K. Lorentzen, Inc., New York, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application April 2.2, 1954, Serial No. 424,983

7 Claims. (Cl. 312-4) This invention relates to a watertight, shock-resistant container, such as a transit case made for delivery by parachute, and to a seal between the unit contained in the case and the body of such case.

Equipment such as radio transmitters and receivers are now frequently delivered by parachute, both under battle conditions and also during peace-time endeavors, such as rescue work and fire fighting. Equipment of this type is relatively fragile and so must be protected by its container against the shock of a parachute landing. Containers for this purpose, commonly called transit cases, support the electronic unit on members making up an inner frame or cradle, the members being isolated by rubber from the body of the case. With such type of mounting, the inner frame or cradle-forming members are to move substantial distances in any direction with respect to the body of the case when the case and its contents land on the ground, thus to cushion the unit.

Because the transit case may sometimes land in a swamp or pond or may be dropped during a rainstorm and remain unprotected for sometime, it is customary to make the transit case, that is, the body of the case with the lid applied thereto, watertight. When, however, the lid is removed from a conventional case of this type, the unit therein ceases to be sealed from the atmosphere. Thus, trouble, such as a short circuit in the electronic unit, has frequently been experienced when the unit is used in the field under conditions of high humidity, during rain and snowstorms, etc., and when the lid is inadvertently left off the body of the transit case during periods of disuse of the unit.

Because of the relatively large amount of freedom of movement necessary between the contents of the case, such as an electronic unit, and the body of the transit case to make the mounting of the unit effectively shock-resistant, no fully satisfactory sealing means has been available prior to this invention whereby the unit is effectively sealed from the atmosphere when it is mounted in the body of the transit case with the lid of the latter removed. Furthermore, not only should an adequate seal between the unit and the body of the case be substantially or wholly watertight, but the sealing means should not interfere substantially with the freedom of movement of the unit-carrying inner frame or cradle. Also, the sealing means should quickly effect a seal with the unit so that the unit may quickly and easily be mounted in and removed from the body of the case, since, in addition to its use when mounted in the body of the transit case in the field, the electronic unit may sometimes be removed from the body of the transit case and positioned on a rack in a perma nent or semi-permanent installation in a building.

It is desirable that the body of the case shall have an easily and positively manipulated door sealing an access opening communicating with the unit. it is also desirable that the body of the case have carrying handles on it which distribute stress over a wide area of the case side wall and can be attached to the case without requiring the formation of holes in the case.

The invention has among its objects the provision of an improved, watertight, shock-resistant transit case partieularly adapted for delivery by parachute.

Another object of the invention lies in the provision of improved sealing means, in transit cases in which the contents are isolated from the body of the case by resilient mounting means, between the contents of the case and the body of the transit case.

An important feature of the invention lies in the provision, in a transit case of the above-indicated type, of a flexible sealing means between the contents of the case and the body of the case, the sealing means being of such character that it does not appreciably affect the action of the resilient means mounting the contents in the case.

Other objects of the invention lie in the provision of an improved watertight, shock-resistant, transit case having a sealed, removable, door covering an access and at least one case-carrying handle attached to the case.

Further objects and objects relating to details and economies of manufacture and use will more definitely appear from the detailed description to follow.

My invention is clearly defined in the appended claims. Where parts are, for clarity and convenience, refe red to on the basis of their oriented position shown in Fig. l of the accompanying drawing, no limitation as to the positioning of the entire structure is to be implied, since it will be understood that the transit-case body, together with its contents, may be used in upright position or in an inclined position as by being tipped somewhat from the vertical. Also in both the description and the claims, parts at times may be identified by specific means for clarity and convenience, but such nomenclature is to be understood as having the broadest meaning consistent with the context and with the concept of my invention as distinguished from the pertinent prior art. The best form in which I have contemplated applying my invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing forming part of this specification, in which:

Fig. 1 is an exploded view in perspective of the organization consisting of the transit case and its contents, specifically an electronic unit, the lid being removed from the transit case body and the unit being shown partially removed from the body of the case.

Fig. 2 is a view in plan of the body of the case with the unit in fully mounted position therein.

Fig. 3 is a view in perspective of the assembled transit case body and lid turned on its side in position to be carried.

Fig. 4 is a view in perspective of the closed case in vertical position, portions of the lid and side wall of the case being broken away for clarity of illustration.

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary view in vertical section through the carrying-handle structure of the case, the section being taken along the line 5-5 in Fig. 3.

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary view in section through the access opening and closure therefor of the transit case, the section being taken along the line 66 in Fig. 3.

Fig. 7 is an enlarged fragmentary view in vertical section through the assembled transit case body and lid, the electronic unit being shown generally in side elevation, the top panel of such unit being shown in section, the section being taken along the line 7-7 in Fig. 4.

Fig. 8 is a view in section of the unit-sealing means or gasket member per se, the member being shown in section generally coinciding with that designated by line 77 in Fig. 4.

The watertight, shock-resistant equipment of the present invention comprises a transit case composed of an open-topped watertight, transit case body and a lid for the body, there being a watertight seal between the body and lid. The body of the case provides space for the reception of a boxlike unit of equipment, such as radio equipment, the unit having a top panel overhanging the body of the unit on all edges. When the unit is mounted in the body of the case, the panel on top of the unit lies within the top of the body of the case and is appreciably spaced therefrom, there being weight-bearing, downwardly yieldable, shock-absorbing mountings between the bottom of the unit and the body of the case, and upper and lower resilient, laterally yieldable, shock-absorbing and unit-guiding mountings capable of bearing the weight of the unit located between the sides of the unit and the sides of the body of the case.

In accordance with the invention, a means is provided for sealing the upper end of the unit to the body of the case without appreciably affecting the action of the resilient unit-mounting means, the sealing means preferably being of such character that it bears a small portion of the weight of the unit and effects a seal therewith by virtue of the pressure between it and the unit. Specifically, the sealing means comprises a rubber or rubber-like gasket having a body with a portion surrounding, and

movable with. the upper end of the unit and in engage ment with the underside of the overhanging edge of the panel. Means including the upper, laterally yieldable mountings support the gasket body and hold it in tight, sealing relationship with the edge of the panel. Integral with the gasket body there is a flexible expansible skirt or web, the first, lower part of the skirt extending upwardly toward the wall of the body of the case. A case body wall-contacting ring is connected to the upper terminus of the skirt, and means is provided to urge the ring outwardly into sealing contact with the wall of the body of the case.

The transit case shown is designated as a whole by the character 10, the case having a normally lower main part or body 11 and a removable lid 12. The contents of the case illustrated is in this instance an electronic unit 14 having a boxlike body portion and a top panel 15 which overhangs the body of the unit on all sides. The boxlike case of the unit 14 itself is usually not watertight, because of the need of ready access to the electronic unit. The controls, such as knobs and dials positioned on shafts protruding through the panel, however, may easily be made watertight by the provision of sealing glands around the shafts.

The unit 14, which when fully mounted in the case body 11 has the panel 15 at the top, with all edges of the panel downwardly within and spaced appreciably from the side and end panels of the body 11, is suspended on a shock-absorbing-and-resisting composite inner frame or cradle composed of the bottom supports 16, the lower side guiding means 20, and the upper side guiding means 21. Each of the unit supporting and/or guiding members, 17, at the bottom, 26, at the side of the lower end, and 29 at the top of the unit, is supported upon and isolated from the corresponding portions of the body of the transit case by elongated blocks of rubber bonded to the body directly at the bottom and to channels 24 at the sides of the case body, and to such supporting and/ or guiding members.

The member 17 is in the form of an open sheet-metal frame, similar to frame 56 of the lid 12, to be described; each side of member 17 is supported by a longitudinally extending block of rubber. Each of the members 26 and 29, however, is made separate from its fellows and is spaced appreciably from its neighbors at the corners of the transit case, to provide them adequate freedom of movement regardless of the manner of fall of the transit case. Members 26 and 29 are interrupted on one side of the transit case to receive the two vertical track-like flanges on that side of the unit, as shown in Fig. 1. To protect the case from injury, the corners of the body are provided with external buffer channels 31, as shown. The lid 12 has a similar buffer channel 32 extending therearound.

The horizontal members integral with members 29 of the upper side mounting and guiding means 21 serve to support the body 35 of the rubber or rubberlike unit-sealing means designated 34. Sealing mean 34 bridges the space between the edges of panel 15 and the inner side walls of the body of the case with a flexible wall impervious to moisture, dust, etc. The body 35, as shown in Figs. 2, 7, and 8, is in the form of an open frame of heavy, block-like section, which has an upper rabbet 39 into which the edge of panel 15 fits. The horizontal surface of the rabbet, beneath the edge of the panel, is provided with shallow parallel V-shaped ridges 40 which form a seal with the panel when under the at least moderate down pressure normally provided by the unit 14 on the body 35 when the transit case is positioned ttpright or at a moderate angle with respect to the vertical. Body 35 has a large shallow bottom rabbet in which there lies the open sheet-metal frame 36, which is bonded thereto. At the location of flanges 38 on the unit the frame 36 is notched to receive the flanges. Body 35 of the sealing means is secured to the supporting members 30 by machine screws, such.as 42 in Fig. 7, extending through holes 43 in the body 35, and the member 36, and which are screwed into member 30. Along the ends of the case the panel 15 of the unit requires nothing other than the weight of the unit to maintain it in place on the sealing means 35. At the location of the flanges 38 the rabbetted inner edge of body 35 yields as the unit 14 is introduced into the case, and snaps back into horizontal sealing position after the upper ends of the flanges have cleared such edges. Along each side of the case it is usually preferred positively to retain the panel 15 in place by the retractable L-shaped keeper 41 the base of which overlies the body 35. The headed screws 42 (Fig. 7) extend through transverse slots in the base of member 41. When screws 42 are loosened, keeper 41 may be thrust inwardly to overlie the edge of the panel 15. When screws 42 are tightened, the keeper positively holds the panel 15 in sealing engagement with surface 40.

As clear from Figs. 2, 7, and 8, sealing member 34 has a relatively thin flexible and expansible skirt or web 44, the inner portion 45 of which rises angularly from the outer upper corner of each side of the frame-like body 35, the four sections of the skirt meeting along outwardly and upwardly directed gutters 48 (Fig. 2). Outwardly of each side portion 45 the skirt has a vertical portion 46 which lies parallel and close to the inner surface of the confronting side panel 22 or end panel 65 of the body of the transit case when the unit 14 is normally centered in the case. Connecting the outer edge of each of portions 45 with the corresponding vertical portion 46 of the skirt is a partially open fold or pleat, having the shape.- in section, of a tipped Z, and extending parallel to the confronting wall of the case.

The upper edge of the vertical portions 46 of the sealing means 34 is provided with a thickened frame-like member 49 having an outer vertical face provided with shallow parallel horizontal V-shaped ridges which make sealing contact with the confronting inner surface of the case body when pressed against it. Member 49 is pressed outwardly by the overlying downwardly open channel member 54 formed as the lower terminus of the inwardly and downwardly bent edges of the panels of the case body. Portion 51 of panel 22 (Fig. 7) is illustrative of this construction.

When the unit 14 is to be delivered by parachute, the transit case containing the unit is closed by the lid 12. applied to the body as shown in Fig. 7, and held thereon by strap-like means (not shown). The lid has a downwardly (Fig. 7) acting resilient mounting means 55 including a unit panel-engaging open sheet-metal frame 59, the downwardly convex channel 57 formed in the inner plate 63 secured to the lid body by the spot welds 62, and the interposed elongated block-like rubber pieces 56. The resilient mounting 55 acts to support and cushion the unit 14 should the transit case land on its top, and to maintain the unit under compression between mounting means 16 and 55. The lid has a peripheral inner downwardly open channel formed between its edge and the flange 61 on the inner plate of the lid, such channel retaining the rubber or rubber-like sealing material 60. When the lid is fully applied to the body of the case, as in Fig. 7, the upper folded edge 52 of each side and end panel of the case sealingly engages the means 60.

When the transit case and its contained unit 14 are dropped, it usually lands bottom end down, because of its manner of attachment to the parachute. Cross winds, natural obstacles, such as trees and rocks, however, may cause it to land in an indefinite number of positions. The resilient mountings 16, 20, 21, and 55 by themselves and in cooperation cushion the body against undue shock in any direction, the unit 14 moving within the transit case, after impact, for an appreciable distance in the direction of its travel before impact. The sealing means 34 is of such construction that suflicient slack material is provided in the flexible expansible web or skirt 44 that the skirt will not be ruptured by the cushioning travel of the unit 14 with respect to the case in any direction, the partially open pleat or fold supplying sufficient slack in the skirt under all conditions. The skirt 44 is sufficiently flexible for it not to interpose any appreciable restraint upon the cushioning travel of the unit in any direction with respect to the case.

When the transit case is retrieved after its drop, it will normally be turned right side up (Fig. 1) before the lid 12 is removed. In its upright position, a portion of the weight of the unit 14 is borne by the body 35 of the sealing means so that a seal is efiected between the panel of the unit and the body of the case. The lid may now be removed and the unit used under moist or rainy conditions, provided the operating knobs and so on extending through the panel are adequately sealed, without the leakage of water into the unit. If the unit is to be removed from the case this may readily be done by loosening the keepers 41, retracting them, and lifting the unit from the case.

The transit box of the invention includes a novel handle structure shown in detail in Fig. 5, which minimizes localized strain of the end panel of the case and facilitates the making of the case watertight. The handle-supporting plate structure 64, applied to an end panel 65, includes a mounting plate 66 which is spot-welded to the panel. Plate 66 is provided with three spaced frusto-conical proiections 67. A generally cup-shaped cover plate 69 overlies the central portion of plate 66 and is retained thereon with its edges in contact with plate 66 by the machine screws 70, which extend through the plate 69 into the screw-threaded central openings in projections 67. The handle 72 is provided with a O-shaped hail, the inwardly projecting ends of which extend through openings in the opposite side walls of the cover plate 69. The handle structure 64 is applied to the case without requiring the formation of holes in the casepanel, and the handle structure distributes the stress over a wide area of the anel.

It is desirable that the transit case of the invention be provided with an opening allowing access to the unit 14. In the case illustrated, such access opening is located at 74, on the bottom panel 75. As more clearly shown in Fig. 6, panel 75 has an aperture 76 which is closed and sealed by the removable access door 77. Door 77, which is of sheet-metal construction, has an inwardly facing channel 79 confronting the edge of the aperture 76, the sealing gasket 80 held in the channel sealingly cooperating with the panel 75 around the edge of the aperture.

The door 77 is retained in place by a tang 81 projecting from one edge thereof, the tang being loosely hingedly received in the slot 82 through the edge of the buffer channel 31. The other three edges of the door 77' are secured to panel 75 by means of Dzus-type fasteners 85 positioned on the outer channel 84 on the door and cooperating with the respective receptacles 86 of the fasteners atlixed to panel 75 of the case.

I claim:

1. Equipment for delivery by parachute comprising: a boxlike unit having a top panel overhanging the body of the unit on all four edges, an open-topped, watertight, transit case body telescopically receiving the unit with the panel inwardly of the top of the case body and the edges of the panel appreciably spaced from the case body, weight-bearing, downwardly yieldable, shock-absorbing mountings between the bottom of the unit and the case body, upper and lower resilient, laterally yieldable, shockabsorbing and unit-guiding mountings located between the sides of the unit and the sides of the case body, and means sealing the upper end of the unit to the case body without appreciably affecting the action of the resilient, unit-mounting means, said sealing means comprising a gasket having a central body with a portion surrounding and movable with the upper end of the unit and in engagement with the'underside of the overhanging portion of the panel, means to support the gasket body and to hold it in tight, sealing relationship with the edge of the panel, an expansible flexible skirt attached to the outer edges of the gasket body and extending toward the wall of the case body, and means at the outer terminus of the skirt sealingly engaging the wall of the case body.

2. Equipment for delivery by parachute comprising: a boxlike unit having a top panel overhanging the body of the unit on all four edges, an open-topped, watertight, transit case body telescopically receiving the unit with the panel inwardly of the top of the case body and the edges of the panel appreciably spaced from the case body. weight-bearing, downwardly yieldable, shock-absorbing mountings between the bottom of the unit and the case body, upper and lower resilient, laterally yieldable, shockabsorbing and unit-guiding mountings located between the sides of the unit and the sides of the case body, and means sealing the upper end of the unit to the case body without appreciably affecting the action of the resilient, unit-mounting means, said sealing means comprising a gasket having a central body with a portion surrounding and movable with the upper end of the unit and in engagement with the underside of the overhanging portion of the panel, means including the upper, laterally yieldable mountings to support the gasket body and to hold it in tight, sealing relationship with the edge of the panel, a pleated expansible flexible skirt attached to the outer edges of the gasket body and extending outwardly toward the wall of the case body, a case-body-wall-contacting ring connected to the outer terminus of the skirt, and means urging the ring outwardly into sealing contact with the wall of the case body.

3. Equipment for delivery by parachute comprising: a boxlike unit having a top panel overhanging the body of the unit on all four edges, an open-topped, watertight. transit case body telescopically receiving the unit with the panel inwardly of the top of the case body and the "edges of the panel appreciably spaced from the case body, weight-bearing, downwardly yieldable shock-absorbing mountings between the bottom of the unit and the case body, upper and lower resilient, laterally yieldable, shockabsorbing and unit-guiding mountings located between the'sides of the unit and the sides of the case body, and means sealing the upper end of the unit to the case body without appreciably affecting the action of the resilient, unit-mounting means, said sealing means comprising a gasket having a central body with a portion surrounding and movable with the upper end of the unit and in engagement with the underside of the overhanging portion of the panel, means including the inner, unit-contacting portions of the upper, laterally yieldable mountings to support the gasket body and to hold it in tight, sealing relationship with the edge of the panel, an expansible flexible skirt attached to the outer edges of the gasket body and including a first portion extending angularly upwardly and outwardly and a second portion connected to the outer edge of the first portion and extending substantially vertical and parallel to the wall of the case body, a ring connected to the upper terminus of the second portion of the skirt contacting the wall of the case, and means urging the ring outwardly into sealing contact with the wall of the case body.

4. Equipment for delivery by parachute comprising: a boxlike unit having a top panel overhanging the body of the unit on all four edges, an open-topped, watertight, transit case body telescopically receiving the unit with the panel inwardly of the top of the case body and the edges of the panel appreciably spaced from the case body, weight-bearing, downwardly yieldable, shock-absorbing mountings between the bottom of the umt and the case body, upper and lower resilient, laterally yieldable, shock-absorbing and unit-guiding mountings located between the sides of the unit and the sides of the case body, and means sealing the upper end of the unit to the case body without appreciably afl'ecting the action of the resilient, unit-mounting means, said sealing means comprising a gasket having a central body with a portion surrounding and movable with the upper end of the unit and in engagament with the underside of the overhanging portion of the panel, means including the inner, un1tcontacting portions of the upper, laterally yieldable mountings to support the gasket body and to hold it in tight, sealing relationship with the edge of the panel, an expansible flexible skirt attached to the outer, upper edges of the gasket body and including a first portion extending angularly upwardly and outwardly, a normally partially open pleat at the outer terminus of the first portion, and a second portion connected to the outer end of the pleat and extending substantially vertical parallel to the wall of the case, a ring connected to the upper terminus of the second portion of the skirt contacting the wall of the case, and means urging the ring outwardly into sealing contact with the wall of the ease body.

5. Equipment adapted for delivery by parachute comprising: an open-topped, watertight transit case body, adapted telescopically to receive a boxlike unit having a top panel overhanging the body of the unit on all sides within it, weight-bearing, downwardly yieldable, shockabsorbing mountings "on the bottom of the case body, upper and lower, laterally inwardly directed, shockabsorbing and unit-guiding mountings attached to the sides of the case body, and sealing means at the upper end of the case body for sealing the upper end of the unit to the case body without appreciably affecting the action of the resilient unit-mounting means, said sealing means comprising a gasket having a central body with a unit-receiving opening therethrough, the portion of the gasket body bounding the opening having a surface adapted to make sealing engagement with the overhanging top panel on the unit, means including the upper, laterally yieldable mountings to support the gasket body, an expansible flexible skirt attached to an outer edge of the gasket body and extending toward the wall of the transit case body, and means on the outer terminus of the skirt making a sealing connection with the wall of the case.

6. Equipment adapted for delivery by parachute comprising: an open-topped, watertight transit case body,

adapted telescopically to receive a boxlike unit having a top panel overhanging the body of the unit on all sides within it, weight-bearing, downwardly yieldable, shockabsorbing mountings on the bottom of the case body, upper and lower, laterally inwardly directed, shock-absorbing and unit-guiding mountings attached to the sides of the case body, and sealing means at the upper end of the case body for sealing the upper end of the unit to the case body without appreciably alfecting the action of the resilient unit-mounting means, said sealing means comprising a gasket having a central body with a unit-receiving opening therethrough, the central body being adaptzd to move with the upper end of the unit and to engage the underside of the overhanding portion of the panel, means including the inner, unit-contacting portions of the upper, laterally yieldable mountings to support the gasket body, an expansible flexible skirt attached to the outer edges of the gasket body and including a first portion extending angularly upwardly and outwardly and a second portion connected to the outer edge of the first portion and extending substantially vertical and parallel to the wall of the case body, a ring connected to the upper terminus of the second portion of the skirt contacting the wall of the case, and means urging the ring outwardly into sealing contact with the wall of the case body.

7. Equipment adapted for delivery by parachute comprising: an open-topped, watertight transit case body, adapted telescopicaly to receive a boxlike unit having a top panel overhanging the body of the unit on all sides within it, weight-bearing, downwardly yieldable, shockabsorbing mountings on the bottom of the case body, upper and lower, laterally inwardly directed, shock-absorbing and unit-guiding mountings attached to the sides of the case body, and sealing means at the upper end of the case body for sealing the upper end of the unit to the case body without appreciably atfecting the action of the resilient unit-mounting means, said sealing means comprising a gasket having a central body with a unitreceiving opening therethrough, the central body being adapted to move with the upper end of the unit and to engage the underside of the overhanging por'ion of the panel, means including the inner unit contacting portions of the upper, laterally yieldable mountings to support the gasket body, an expansible flexible sk rt attached to the outer, upper edges of the gasket body and including a first portion extending angularly upwardly and out wardly, a normally partially open pleat at the outer terminus of the first portion, and a second portion connected to the outer end of the pleat and extending substantially vertical parallel to the wall of the case, a ring connected to the upper terminus of the second portion of the skirt contacting the wall of the case, and means urging the ring outwardly into sealing contact with the wall of the case body.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 958,745 Holtzhauser May 24, 1910 2,364,073 Howard Dec. 5, 1944 2,546,922 Dunneback Mar. 27, 1951 2,587,645 O'Neill Mar. 4, 1952 2,659,514 Henderson Nov. 17, 1953 2,681,142 Cohen June 15, 1954

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Classifications
U.S. Classification312/7.1, 455/351, 206/591, 312/352, 217/53, 220/920, 220/23.87, 220/315, 220/378, 220/766
International ClassificationB65D81/07
Cooperative ClassificationY10S220/92, B65D81/07
European ClassificationB65D81/07