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Publication numberUS2748512 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 5, 1956
Filing dateJan 2, 1953
Priority dateJan 2, 1953
Publication numberUS 2748512 A, US 2748512A, US-A-2748512, US2748512 A, US2748512A
InventorsKulicke Jr Frederick W
Original AssigneeProctor Electric Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ironing table
US 2748512 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 5, 1956 w. KULICKE, JR

IRONING TABLE 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 2, 1955 June 5, 1956 F. w. KULICKE, JR

IRONING TABLE 5 Sheets-Sheet. 5

Filed Jan. 2, 1953 FreCZQ/MWKMJ- QM IQN N N United States PatentO IRONING TABLE Frederick W. Kulicke, Jr., Mount Airy, Pa., assignor to Proctor Electric Company, Philadelphia, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Application January 2, 1953, Serial No. 329,200

' 10 Claims. (cuss-121) This .invention relates to adjustable and collapsible ironing tables.

The general structure of the preferred form of the present ironing table is as shown in the copending applica tion of H. E. Hortman, Jr., Serial No. 155,435, filed April 12, 1950, and the present invention may be regarded as providing improvements in such an ironing table.

The modern trend in ironing tables has been toward provision of a wide range of adjustability to permit ironing either while standing or sitting. Sit-down ironing has contributed greatly toward greater ease of ironing, as have also improvements which have been made from the standpoint of ease of handling and adjusting the ironing table. The modern trend has also been toward all-metal construction of ironing tables, and while such construction provides desirable strength and rigidity, the modern ironing table is necessarily of substantial Weight despite the fact that the weight has been minimized as far as possible. The above-mentioned Hortman application and the copending application of C. H. Rewald, In, Serial No. 193,943, filed November 3, 1950, now Patent No. 2,701,425, dated February 8, 1955, represent advances in the art, both from the standpoint of easing the ironing task and from the standpoint of easing or facilitating the handling and adjustment of the ironing table. The present application represents a further advance in these respects.

The principal object of the present invention is to pro vide an adjustable and collapsible ironing table which may be handled and adjusted with greater ease than has heretofore been possible.

Another object of the invention is to provide an ironing table which may be adjusted to a large number of operating heights and is not limited to adjustment to a number of discrete heights.

Other objects of the invention will be apparent from the following detailed description in which the novel features will be particularly pointed' out.

A preferred form of the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which Fig. 1 is a bottom view of the collapsed ironing table, with one of the legs broken away for the sake of illustration;

Fig. 2 is. a side elevational view of the collapsed ironing table, with certain portions broken away for the sake of illustration;

Fig. 3 is a cross-sectional view taken on line 3-3 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a partial cross-sectional view taken on 11ne 44 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 5 is a sectional view taken on line 5-5 of Fig. 4, showing the operating mechanism for adjustability of the ironing table; A

Fig. 6 is a sectional View taken on line 66 of Fig. 5;

Fig. 7 is a sectional view taken on line 77 of Fig. 5;

Fig. 8 is an exploded perspective view of the manual releasing mechanism; 9

Fig. 9 is a partial longitudinal section taken on line 9--9 of Fig. 1, with some of the parts broken to enable inclusion of the illustration within the available space;

Fig. 9a is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view of the jam plate;

Fig. 10 is a perspective view of the friction locking mechanism which serves to retain the ironing table in any position of adjustment, the view being taken from below said mechanism;

Fig. 11 is a perspective view of the same mechanism taken from above the same; and

Figs. 12 to 14 are views illustrating the handling of the ironing table.

Referring particularly to Figs. 1, 2 and 14, the ironing table comprises a top 1 and crossed legs 2 and 3 pivotally connected at 4. Preferably, the leg 2 comprises a single elongate member with a transverse foot 5, while the leg 3 comprises a pair of parallel elongate members between which the leg 2 extends and which are provided with a transverse foot 6. The ironing table is preferably of allmetal construction, and the support-ing legs and their transverse feet are preferably of tubular form.

The top 1 is preferably of the construction disclosed and claimed in a copending application of H. E. Hortman, In, Serial No. 155,436, filed April 12, 1950, now Patent No. 2,663,957, dated December 29, 1953. Such construction comprises a sheet metal top member having longitudinal V-ribs 7, and transverse channel-shaped braces 8, 9 and 10, and also a transverse ribbed brace 11, the various braces being secured to the top member and being located along the underside of the top substantially as shown in Fig. l. a The present invention is not concerned with the specific structure of the top but in its preferred form, as illustrated, it utilizes the transverse braces to accommodate the operating mechanism, as hereinafter described.

Referring now to the attachment of the legs to the table top, the upper end of the leg 2 is connected to the top by means of a fixed pivot connection comprising a trans verse pin 12 fastened to said leg, for example by being welded thereto, and bearing brackets 13 rotatably supporting the pin 12 and preferably secured to the crossbrace 8. The upper end of leg 3 is connected to the table top by means of a sliding pivot connection comprising a transverse pin 14 secured to said leg, and a pair of supporting guides 15 whose ends are preferably secured to the cross-braces 9 and 10, as by being welded thereto. The ends of pin 14 are movably supported by channel-shaped sections formed in said guides. As may be seen in Fig. l, the legs are preferably offset with respect to the longitudinal axis of the top 1, the purpose of this being to provide greater knee room during sit-down ironing. The transverse foot 6 of the rear leg 3 is preferably provided with wheels or rollers 16, this being a feature of the above-mentioned Rewald application.

As thus far described, the ironing table illustrated is of the character disclosed in the first-mentioned Hortman application No. 155,435. In accordance with the present invention, the ironing table is provided with the mechanism now to be described for retaining the ironing table in any desired position during use thereof. As will be seen from the subsequent description, the mechanism provided by this invention greatly facilitates handling and adjustment of the ironing table.

As may be seen in Figs. 1 and 9, a rod 17 is arranged for slidable movement at the underside of 'the table top and is connected to the upper part of leg 3. Preferably, one end of the rod 17 is looped about the pin 14 between raised lugs 14a thereon, and the rod extends through apertures 18 in the opposite sides of the channel-shaped brace 9. A tension spring 19 has one end secured to the rod-17 at 20, and has its other end secured to the table top 1 at 21. The purpose of 'this spring will be described later. cooperatively associated with "the rod 17 is a locking member or jam plate 22 which is adapted to frictionally engage the rod 17 and prevent movement thereof when'the ironing table is'set up a des iredposition of adjustment. "As ay be. seen in Figsf9f'to 11, an inverted LJ-shaped'member 23 disposed"wi thin the channelsha'ped brace 9 and supported thereby. Themernber 23 has, a curved top 24 which is apertured at 25 to aceommodate the upper end of the jam plate 22, the curved top providing clearance 'during pivotal action of said jam plate. The latter is apertured at 26 to accommodate the rod 17 which extends through thejam plate; One side of member 23 is recessed at 27 to accommodate the rod 17 and provide clearance therefor, whilethe opposite side of member 23 isapertured and has an extruded inturned edge 28 which serves to slidably support the rod 17. As may be seen in Fig. 4, thei m'ember 23 is seated in the channel-shaped brace 9.between two of the ribs 7a and 7b extending downward from the top 1. As shown in Figs. a'rid 'llpthe depending sides 29 and 30 of member 23 have square lower corners which are adapted to engage the supporting brace, 9 and the ribs 7a. and 7b (Figs. 4 and 5). The member 23 also. has" tabs31 extending from its top which are adapted to extend into recesses in the ribs 7a and 7b, as may be seen in Fig. 4. This arrangement serves to index the brace 9 in proper position, along the length of the ironing table during assembly. Y

It will be seen that the locking member or jam plate 22 is pivotally anchored to the table topby virtue of the fact that its upper end is retained in the aperture 25 in member 23 which is fixedly secured with respect to the mp1. It will also be seenthat the jam plate 22 is movable between a position in which the axis of its aperture is aligned with the rod axis and a position in which the aperture axis is at an oblique angle to the rod axis, as shown by thebroken line and solid line illustrations in Fig. 9. When the jam plate 22 is in the broken line po sition, the rod 17 is free to move, but when the jam plate is in its tilted position, it frictionally engages the rod "17 and locks it against'movementtoward the right as viewed in Fig. 9, 'The jam plate extends through an opening 9a in the bottom of the br'ace 9, and the opening 9d permits tilting of the jarn plate from the broken linepositiononlyin one direction as shown in Fig. 9, the left-handedge -of the opening preventing tilting of the jam plate in the opposite direction. As may be seen in Figs. 9Ito ll, thejam plate has an extension 22a which causes it to gravitate to the respective positions abovementioned when the ironing table is tilted upwardly (Fig. 12.) and when it is set up forfuse (Fig. 14).

It has been found that substantial chamfers on the edges of aperture 26 (Fig. 9L1) of jam plate 22 with the edges 26a rounded,greatly increases the reliability of the jam plate lock without nicking the rod 17 "With resulting loss offree movement thereof. It has also proven advantageous to use hardened steel for the jam plate while using cold-rolled steel for the.rod-17 By virtue of the mechanism above-described, the user is enabled to collapse the table, set it. up. for use, or adjustit from one position to any higher position, without anyernanual operation of thejam plate 22; During collapsing or setting up of the ironing table, the jam plate gravitates to inoperativeor operative position without any effort on the part of the user. Duringadjustment from one position to a higher position, the user is required merely to exert a slight lifting force onthe top 1. In this latter connection, it should. be noted that while the tilted jam plate. 22 prevents movement of rod17 in a direction that would permit. collapse of the ironing table, i. e. toward the right in Fig. 9, the jam plate does not prevent movementof the rod 17 in the oppositedirection. In other words, therod 17 andthe jamplate 22 constitute a friction ratchet. Although the spring 19 tends to move rodv 17 towardthe left asviewedinFig. 9,

thus tending to draw the upper ends of the legs toward one another, the weight of the top 1 overcomes this tendency. However, when the user exerts a lifting force on the top 1 to adjust the ironing table from one position to a higher position, the spring 19 is effective to move rod 17 toward the left as viewed in Fig. 9, thus drawing the upper ends of the legs toward one another. Furthermore, when a lifting foree is ex erted on the top 1, the legs themselves tend to move toward a higher position of adjustment due to the fact that they arepivotally interconnected at a point well above the center ofgravity of each leg. The cooperative actions of the spring 19 and the legs themselves; cause the table to move to a higher position of adjustment in response to the lifting force exerted on the tabletop. When the user releases the top the ironing table is held in the higher position of adjustment by the locking action of the jam plate 22 on the rod 17,.

The only time that manual actuation of the jam plate 22 is required is when the ironing table is set up for use and the user desires to lower the table to some lower position. This requires that rod 17 be permitted to. move toward theright 'as viewed in Fig. 9. and, therefore, it requires some manual operation to move the jam plate from its tilted position to the releasing position shown in broken lines in Fig. 9. For thispurpose there is provided a mechanism now to be described.

Referring particularly to Figs. 4 to 8, within the channel-shaped brace 9 there is provided a lever 32, preferably formed of sheet metal, which is pivotally mounted intermediate its ends at 33. An inverted hat-shaped member 34 (see Fig. 8) is insertedthrough a ring-shaped portion 35 of lever 32, with the rim or flange 36 en gaging the raised periphery of the ring portion '35. The crown of the hat-shaped member 34 is permanently secured to the base of the channel brace 9 as by spot welding. Thus, the ring portion 35 of lever 32 is rotatably retained by-the member 34. On the underside of the ring portion 35 are button projections 37 which engage the bottom of channel brace: 9 and reduce friction.

One. end 3 8,of the lever 32 is eng ageable with the ja m plate 22 while the other end 39 is engaged by the end 40 of an, L -shape d manual lever 41 having a long burr-free finger engaging portion 41a. The end 40 of lever 41 is U-shaped to receive and retain the circular end 39 of the lever 32 and is provided with an apertured lug 42 to receivelone.endofa U-shaped biasing spring 43. The opposite end of the spring 43 is anchored to a side of the channel brace 9 at 44. The spring 43.normally maintains the lever. 32inan inefiective position so that its end 38 isout Qf e a eme W th i m plate t n Proj and 46 on the endsof levers32 and 41 serve to reduce friction.

The L-shaped lever 41v is rotatably mounted on the channel brace 9-at 47 in the same way that lever 32 is rotatably mounted. A hat-shaped. member 43. extends through a ring-shaped portion 49.. at the. junction of the arms of the L-shaped lever 41, and the hat-shaped member 48 is secured tothe base of the channel brace.9 as byspot welding. Button projections SO on the ring portion 49 reduce friction with the bottom of channel brace 9. The end 51 of lever 41 is bifurcate d and engages the brace. 11, as best shown in Fig. 7. Thus, the brace 11 serves to support the relatively long arm of the L-shaped lever 41,

As previously indicated, the only time when themansl asin t neeh nistn: s equa d. is he the r n table is set up for use and the user desires to loW he blsl t nt 2. P iti nv w r P s t n. t u m he-. .s=.r.. sa hes neath. h d o q th table top and draws the lever 41 toward theedge of th e o -v This a ses; li ht: wetter-chem on; of lever.41, as, vie ed in Fig 5, a Ild tl 'l l.l$ Cal1S 6S. clockwise qta n v r-1: wh see ad fizenea st e am Plate 22 and moves it from the locking position to thereleasing position, as maybe seen in Fig. 9. During this operation, the user holds both side edges of the ironing table top, as shown in Fig. 14, and permits the table to lower slowly. It should be noted that during this lowering operation the spring 19 serves to retard the lowering of the ironing table because the spring resists separation of the upper ends of the legs. Thus, the spring assists the user during this operation. When the table is in the desired position of adjustment, the user releases lever 41, and the spring 43 moves lever 32 to its ineffective position, whereupon the gravity-biased jam plate 22 moves to its locking position and locks the rod 17 against further movement. If the user inadvertently continues to depress lever 41, the spring will help arrest the fall of the table, and complete fall will be prevented when the user releases the handle as the table lowers to a position below her usual reach. The jam plate will normally be effective to support the table to a predetermined position, e. g. between one and two feet from the floor; beyond this point the jam plate will not engage the rod because of a necked-down area 17a provided near the spring end.

This provision prevents overstressing the support systern at the rather bad amplification angles of the legs 2 and 3.

It has already been pointed out in the preceding description that the spring 19 plays an important part during raising and lowering of the ironing table while it is set up for use. This spring also serves as a counter-balancing means during setting up of the ironing table as depicted in Figs. 12 and 13. When the ironing table is not in use, it is disposed vertically and is supported by the rear leg 3 whose foot 6 engages the floor. In setting up the ironing table, the user grasps the upper end of the top and front leg, as shown in Fig. 12, then opens the table and swings it about the foot 6 as a pivot, as shown in Fig. 13. In the position of Fig. 12, the gravity-biased jam plate 22 is ineffective, and it does not become etfective until the table has been moved to about the position of Fig. 13. During the movement of the table from the vertical position to the position at which the jam plate 22 becomes efiective, the spring 19 counter-acts the tendency of the table to collapse and greatly facilitates the setting up of the table. Were it not for this spring, the setting up operation would be quite diificult, as the user would be required to exert special effort to prevent the table from collapsing before the jam plate 22 becomes effective, there being a finite time required for gravity to rotate the jam plate 22 from its inefiective position to its effective position. Thus, it will be seen that the spring 19 and the gravity-biased jam plate cooperate to prevent collapsing of the table during the complete setting up operation, in which the ironing table is moved from the position of Fig. 12 through the position of Fig. 13 to the position of Fig. 14.

In addition to the above advantages, there is another advantage which results from the combination of the spring and the gravity-actuated friction latching arrangement. Referring particularly to Figs. 9 and 14, when the operator commences to collapse the table by rotating the table about its rear foot member 6, the spring 19 .tends to pull the sliding pivot 14 toward the fixed pivot 13.

jam plate 22 in the direction of release.

In so doing, it tends to rotate the gravity-actuated Thus, as the table is tilted the spring assists the gravitational action on jam plate 22 to help free the jam between it and rod 17, so that the table will collapse. This particular advantage is especially noticeable when there is a tendency for gall- 'ing, or fretting between the jam plate member and the is that the release mechanism comprising levers 32 and 41 is not required to take any of the bearing load to help keep the board in any adjusted position during use. The load is taken entirely by the jam plate 22.

A second important advantage, which results partly from the absence of load on the releasing mechanism and partly from the arrangement shown utilizing two levers and two bearings therefor on a cross-brace, is that the parts of the release mechanism may be formed of light sheet metal.

Still another advantage of the release mechanism illustrated and described is that it provides for easy operation by the fingers of one hand while grasping the edge of the table top. As described above, when it is desired to lower the ironing table from one operating height to another, for example from the solid line position in Fig. 14 to the broken line position, the user grasps both side edges of the table top and it is a simple matter to draw the lever 41 toward the nearby edge of the table top with the fingers of the hand which is grasping that edge. When the ironing table has been lowered to the desired height, the user simply releases the lever 41 and the spring 43 returns the leverage system to its inoperative position. It should be noted that the leverage system is unique in that it translates a small movement of lever 41 laterally of the table top into a movement of the end 38 of lever 32 longitudinally of the table top to move the jam plate 22 to its inefiective position.

A further advantage is that the adjustment system greatly reduces the noise present in previous ratchet adjustment type tables.

From the foregoing description it will be seen that the invention provides an adjustable and collapsible ironing table which is easy to handle and adjust, and which reduces to a minimum manual operations on the part of the user. While a preferred embodiment of the invention has been illustrated and described, the invention is not limited thereto but contemplates such modifications and further embodiments as may occur to those skilled in the art.

I claim:

1. In an adjustable and collapsible ironing table, a table top, a pair of pivotally interconnected crossed legs providing an adjustable and collapsible support structure for said top, a fixed pivot connection between said top and the upper end of one of said legs, a sliding pivot connection between said top and the upper end of the other leg, 9. first member connected to and movable with the upper portion of said other leg, at second member pivotally anchored to the table top and movable between a position in which it frictionally engages said first member to prevent collapse of the ironing table and a second position in which it releases said first member to permit collapse of the table, said second member having its center of gravity offset from its pivot toward one end of the ironing table to gravitate to the respective positions when theironing table is set up for use and when the other end of the ironing table is tilted upwardly, spring means arranged to urge the upper end of said other leg toward the upper end of the first leg to facilitate setting up of the ironing table and raising thereof from one operating height to another, a lever pivotally supported intermediate its ends and engageable with said second member to move the latter to said second position, and manual means for moving said lever to its effective position to release said first member during use of the ironing table when it is desired to lower the table from one operating height to another, said manual means comprising an L-shaped lever pivoted at the junction of its arms and having one of its arms pivotally connected to said first lever and the other arm generally parallel to a side edge of the table top.

2. In an adjustable and collapsible ironingtable, a table top, a pair of pivotally interconnected crossed legs providing an adjustable and collapsible support structure for said top, a fixed pivot connection between said top and the upper end ofione of said legs, a sliding pivot-connectionrbetween said top and the upper end of the other leg, a channel-shaped brace secured to the underside of said top and extending transversely thereof substantially the fullwidth of the top, said brace having sides extending transversely of said top and also having aligned apertures in thesides thereof, a rod connected to the sliding pivot and extending lengthwise of said top through said apertures, a friction locking member pivotally anchored within said brace and having an aperture through which said rod extends, said member being movable between a position in which it frictionally engages the rod and pre vents collapse of the ironing table and a second position in which the-rod is free'to move and the table is permitted to collapse, said member having its center of gravity ofiset from its pivot toward one end of the ironing table to gravitate to the respective positions when the ironing table is set up for use and when the other end of the ironing table is tilted upwardly, a tension spring connected to said top and to said rod to urge said sliding pivot toward the fixed pivot to facilitate setting up of the ironing table and raising thereof from one operating height to another, a lever within said brace pivoted intermediate its ends and engageable with said member to move the latter to said second position, spring means within said brace spaced from said rod and said member and biasing said lever to ineifective position, and an L-shaped lever pivoted at the junction of its arms Within said brace and having one of its arms pivotally connected to said first lever and the other arm extending from said brace generally parallel to a side edge of the table top.

3. An ironing table according to claim 2, including a second transverse brace engaged by the end of said other arm and serving to support the same.

4. In an adjustable and collapsible ironing table, a table top, a pair of pivotally interconnected crossed legs providing an adjustable and collapsible support structure for said top, a fixed pivot connection between said top and the upper end of a first leg of said pair, means providing slidable and pivotal interconnection between said top and the upper end of the second leg of said pair to enable adjustment and collapse of the ironing table, friction latch means connected to said top and to the upper end of said second leg for retaining said support structure in any position of adjustment and for permitting collapse thereof, said latch means comprising a smooth-surfaced elongate member extending longitudinally of said top and connected to the upper end of said second leg, and a member pivotally anchored to said top and tiltable about an axis transverse to the first member for frictional engagement with the first member, said tiltable member having its center of gravity disposed on the side of a vertical line drawn through said pivotal mounting which side is nearest to the upper end of the first leg to urge said tiltable member into latching position when the table is in horizontal operative position, and on the opposite side of said vertical line to urge said tiltable member away from said latching position as said table is tilted from said horizontal operative position about an axis extending transversely of said table with the end of the table adjacent the upper end of the second leg elevated, and spring means interconnecting relatively movable parts of said table structure consisting-of said legs and said top and positioned and stressed to'urge the upper end of said secondtleg toward said first leg.

5. In an adjustable and collapsible ironing table, a table top, a pair of pivotally interconnected cross legs providinganadjustable and collapsible support structure for said; top, a fixed pivot connection between said top and the upper 'end ofafirstleg of said pair, means providing slidable-.and'pivotal'interconnection between said top and "theupper endofthe second legof said pair to enable adjustment and collapse of the ironing table, friction latch means connected to-said top and to the upper end b v l of saidsecondi leg for. retaining said support structure vin any" position of adjustment: and for permitting collapse thereof, said latch: means comprising a smooth-surfaced elongate member extending longitudinally'of said top and connected totheupper endofsaid other leg and amember pivotally anchored to said top and tiltable about an axis transverse to the-first member for frictional engagement with: the first member, said tiltable member having its center of gravity disposed on the side of a vertical line drawn through said pivotal mounting which side is nearest to the upper end of the first leg to urge said tiltable member intolatching position when the table is in horizontal operative position, and on the opposite side of said vertical line to urge said tiltable member away from said latching position as said table is tilted from said horizontal operative position about an axis extending transversely of said table with the end of the table adjacent the upper end of the second leg elevated, and manually-operable means for moving said tiltable member to non-latching position during use of the ironingtable when it is desired to lower the table from one operating height to another.

6. In an adjustable and collapsible ironing table, a table top, a pair of pivotally interconnected crossed legs providing an adjustable and collapsible support structure for said top, a fixed pivot connection between said top and the upper end of a first leg of said pair, means providing slidable and pivotal interconnection between said top andthe upper'end of the second leg of said pair to enable adjustment and collapse of the ironing table, friction latch means connected to said top and to the upper end of said second leg for retaining said supportstructure in any position of adjustment and for permitting collapse thereof, said latch means comprising a smooth-surfaced elongate member extending longitudinally of said top and connected to the upper end of said second leg, and a member pivotally anchored to said top and tiltable about an axis transverse to the first member for frictional engagement with the first member, said tiltable member having its center of gravity disposed on the side'of a vertical line drawn through said pivotal mounting which side is nearest to the upper end of the first leg to urge said tiltable member into latching position when the table is in horizontal operative position, and on the opposite side of said vertical line to urge said tiltable member away from said latching position as said table is tilted from said horizontal operative position about an axis extending transversely of said table with the end of the table adjacent the upper end of the second leg elevated, a lever pivotally supported intermediate its ends and engageable with said tiltable member to move the latter to nonlatching position, and manual means for moving said lever during use of the ironing table to effect release of said latch means when it is desired to lower the table from one operating height to another.

7. In an adjustable and collapsible ironing table, a table top, a pair of pivotally interconnected crossed legs providing an adjustable and collapsible support structure for said top, a fixed pivot connection between said top and the upper end of a first leg of said pair, means providing slidable and pivotal interconnection between said top and' the upper end of the second leg of said pair to enable adjustment and collapse of the ironing table, friction latch means connected to said top and to the upper end of 'said second leg for retaining said support structure in any position'of adjustment and for permitting collapse thereof, said latch means comprising a smooth-surfaced elongate member extending longitudinally of'said top'and connected to the upper end of said second leg, and a member pivotally anchored to said top and tiltable about an axis transverse to the first member forfrictional engagement with the first member, said tiltable memberhaving its center of gravity disposed on the side of avertical line drawn through said pivotal mounting which side is nearest tothe upper end of thefirst leg'tourge saidtiltable member into latching position when the table is in horizontal operative position, and on the opposite side of said vertical line to urge said tiltable member away from said latching position as said table is tilted from said horizontal operative position about an axis extending transversely of said table with the end of the table adjacent the upper end of the second leg elevated, and a tension spring having one end connected to said top and its other end connected to said elongate member to urge the upper end of said second leg toward the upper end of the first leg and tending to relieve said frictional engagement, said spring serving to facilitate setting up and collapsing of the ironing table and to enable raising thereof from one operating height to another merely by exerting lifting force on the table top.

8. In an adjustable and collapsible ironing table, a table top, a pair of pivotally interconnected crossed legs providing an adjustable and collapsible support structure for said top, a fixed pivot connection between said top and the upper end of a first leg of said pair, means providing slidable and pivotal interconnection between said top and the upper end of the second leg of said pair to enable adjustment and collapse of the ironing table, friction latch means connected to said top and to the upper end of said second leg for retaining ,said support structure in any position of adjustment and for permitting collapse thereof, said latch means comprising a smooth-surfaced elongate member extending longitudinally of said top and connected to the upper end of said second leg, and a member pivotally anchored to said top and tiltable about an axis transverse to the first member for frictional engagement with the first member, said tiltable member having its center of gravity disposed on the side of a vertical line drawn through said pivotal mounting which side is nearest to the upper end of the first leg to urge said tiltable member into latching position when the table is in horizontal operative position, and on the opposite side of said vertical line to urge said tiltable member away from said latching position as said table is tilted from said horizontal operative position about an axis extending transversely of said table with the end of the table adjacent the upper end of the second leg elevated, a tension spring having one end connected to said top and its other end connected to said elongate member to urge the upper end of said second leg toward the upper end of the first leg and tending to relieve said frictional engagement, said spring serving to facilitate setting up and collapsing of the ironing table and to enable raising thereof from one operating height to another merely by exerting lifting force on the table top, and manually-operable means for moving said tiltable member to non-latching position during use of the ironing table when it is desired to lower the table from one operating height to another.

9. In an adjustable and collapsible ironing table, a table top, a pair of pivotally interconnected crossed legs providing an adjustable and collapsible support structure for said top, a fixed pivot connection between said top and the upper end of a first leg of said pair, means providing slidable and pivotal interconnection between said top and the upper end of the second leg of said pair to enable adjustment and collapse of the ironing table, and friction latch means connected to said top and to the upper end of said second leg for retaining said support structure in any position of adjustment and for permitting collapse thereof, said latch means comprising a smooth-surfaced elongate first member extending longitudinally of said top and a second member tiltable about an axis transverse to said first member and engageable with the first member in frictionally latched relationship thereto, one of said members being fixed longitudinally of said top and the other being connected to and movable with the upper end of said second leg, and means pivotally mounting said second member for tilting movement to and from said frictionally latched relationship under the force of gravity, the center of gravity of said second member being disposed on the side of a vertical line drawn through its pivotal mounting in a direction to urge it into latching position when said table is in horizontal operative position, and on the oppo site side of a vertical line drawn through said mounting to urge it away from said latching position as said table is tilted upwardly from said horizontal operative position about an axis extending transversely of said table.

10. In an adjustable and collapsible ironing table, a table top, a pair of pivotally interconnected'crossed legs providing an adjustable and collapsible support structure for said top, a fixed pivot connection between said top and the upper end of a first leg of said pair, means providing slidable and pivotal interconnection between said top and the upper end of the second leg of said pair to enable adjustment and collapse of the ironing table, friction latch means connected to said top and to the upper end of said second leg for retaining said support structure in any position of adjustment and for permitting collapse thereof, said latch means comprising a smooth-surfaced elongate first member extending longitudinally of said top and a second member tiltable about an axis transverse to said first member and engageable with the first member in frictionally latched relationship thereto, one of said members being fixed longitudinally of said top and the other being connected to and movable with the upper end of said second leg, and means pivotally mounting said second member for tilting movement to and from said frictionally latched relationship under the force of gravity, the center of gravity of said second member being disposed on the side of a vertical line drawn through its pivotal mounting in a direction to urge it into latching position when said table is in horizontal operative position, and on the opposite side of a vertical line drawn through said mounting to urge it away from said latching position as said table is tilted upwardly from said horizontal operative position about an axis extending transversely of said table, and spring means interconnecting relatively movable parts of said table structure consisting of said legs and said top and positioned and stressed to urge the upper ends of said legs toward each other.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 358,660 Hammer Mar. 1, 1887 804,244 Messer Nov. 14, 1905 1,609,716 Holden Dec. 7, 1926 1,982,205 Doman Nov. 27, 1934

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2913839 *Oct 20, 1955Nov 24, 1959Arvin Ind IncIroning table
US4759296 *Dec 22, 1986Jul 26, 1988Lear Siegler, Inc.Ironing board
US4769894 *Jan 4, 1988Sep 13, 1988Lear Siegler Seymour Corp.Ironing board
US4821650 *Jan 4, 1988Apr 18, 1989Lear Seymour Seymour CorporationIroning board
US5272825 *Jul 9, 1992Dec 28, 1993Seymour Housewares CorporationMesh top ironing board with stepped periphery
US7131222Apr 13, 2005Nov 7, 2006Whitney Design, Inc.Ironing board and container support ensemble
USRE33918 *May 9, 1989May 12, 1992Lear Siegler Seymour Corp.Ironing board
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DE19946868A1 *Sep 30, 1999Apr 5, 2001Klaus CastellClothes iron has plastic protective element between contact surface and control fitting; protective element is attached to control fitting and substantially encloses contact surface
Classifications
U.S. Classification108/117
International ClassificationD06F81/00, D06F81/04
Cooperative ClassificationD06F81/04
European ClassificationD06F81/04