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Publication numberUS2748905 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 5, 1956
Filing dateAug 12, 1953
Priority dateAug 12, 1953
Publication numberUS 2748905 A, US 2748905A, US-A-2748905, US2748905 A, US2748905A
InventorsJulius Avruch
Original AssigneeJulius Avruch
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Antenna protector
US 2748905 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 5, 1956 J. AVRUCH 2,748,905

ANTENNA PROTECTOR Filed Aug. 12, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 IN V EN TOR.

12 75. M Juuus AVRUCH June 5, 1956 J. AVRUCH 2,748,905

ANTENNA PROTECTOR Filed Aug. 12, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 mmvroa dumus AVRUCH United States Patent ANTENNA PROTECTOR Julius Avruch, Long Island City, N. Y. Application August 12, 1953, Serial No. 373,931

4 Claims. (Cl. HEP-26) This invention relates to protectors for the radio antenna or aerial of automobiles.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a means for protecting a radio antenna or aerial of automobiles against handling and possible damage by unauthorized persons.

It is another object of the present invention to provide antenna protectors wherein only the owner can operate the release mechanism thereof by way of a key or other device, otherwise inaccessible to others.

It is another object of the present invention to provide an antenna protector of the above type wherein the locking is done in such a way that only people with intimate knowledge of the construction thereof could possibly unlatch the antenna.

Other objects of the present invention are to provide antenna protectors which are of simple construction, inexpensive to manufacture, have a minimum number of parts, are easy to use and efficient in operation.

For further comprehension of the invention, and of the objects and advantages thereof, reference will be had to the following description and accompanying drawings, and to the appended claims in which the various novel features of the invention are more particularly set forth.

In the accompanying drawings forming a material part of this disclosure:

Fig. l is a vertical sectional view of an antenna protector embodying the features of the present invention, showing the ball end of the antenna in a pushed-in position.

Fig. 2 is a view similar to Fig l, but showing a modified form of the present invention.

Fig. 3 is a top plan view of the modified form shown in Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a View similar to Figs. 1 and 2 but showing a still further modified form of the invention.

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary side elevational view of one of the parts shown in Fig. 4.

Fig. 6 is a view similar to Figs. 1, 2 and 4, but showing a still further modified form of the invention.

Fig. 7 is a view similar to Fig. 6 but showing a still further modified form.

Fig. 8 is a transverse sectional view taken along the line 8-8 of Fig. 7.

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary vertical section view taken along the line 9--9 of Fig. 7.

Referring now more in detail to the drawings, in which similar reference numerals identify corresponding parts throughout the several views, there is shown in Fig. 1 a fender 19 provided with an opening 11 through which projects upwardly a hollow tubular member 12 having an externally threaded upper end 13. A rubber base pad 14 supports a pedestal 15 having a central opening 16 receiving the upwardly extending tubular member 12 therethrough, the pedestal 15 and pad 14 being retained on fender by a tightening nut 9.

A telescopic antenna 17 extends upwardly through the tubular member 12, the usual ball end 18 being screwed to the topmost antenna element, substantially as illustrated.

A cap 19 is provided with a central bore 20 adapted to receive the antenna 13 and an upper enlarged bore 21 adapted to receive the ball end 14 when the antenna is in the retracted position shown in the drawings. The bottom end of bore 20 is enlarged and internally threaded, as at 22, permitting the cap 19 to be screwed onto externally threaded portion 13.

A spring-pressed detent 23 is mounted within the upper portion of cap 19 and acts on a groove 24 provided in ball end 18 in the manner shown. The antenna is pushed down and held in retracted position by spring-pressed detent 23, thereby preventing anyone from getting a grip on the ball end 18.

Only after inserting the key or wedge or similar device, not shown, in a slot 25, or plurality of slots, which bypass antenna 17 to engage the ball end 18, can the latter be pushed out of the bore 21 sufticiently to permit the secure grip necessary to pull the antenna out in the usual manner.

In the case where an air cylinder is normally employed to push out the antenna, no key or wedge or device is necessary to unlock. The air pressure, regulated and actuated from inside the automobile, is sufiicient to overcome the force of the spring-pressed detent 23.

It will be noted that the nesting of the ball end 18 of the antenna within cap 19 prevents the antenna from normally being pulled out for lack of sufiicient grip.

Referring now to Figs. 2 and 3, there is shown a modified form of the invention, differing from the first form in that the antenna is not out of reach but rather is locked into its inner position by a protective cap consisting of one or more hinged parts which hold the antenna by way of forked ends or other means.

in this form, the cap 19 of the first form is replaced by a flat cylindrical member 26, the member as having a bore 27 receiving antenna 17 The antenna 17 is provided with double ball ends 28 and 2? substantially as illustrated. The bottom end of bore 27 is enlarged and internally threaded, as at 3%), permitting member 26 to be screwed onto externally threaded portion 13, a gasket 31 being provided on the upper end of threaded portion 13.

A protective cap or housing consisting of a pair of cooperating halves 32 and 33 is provided, each of the halves 32 and 33 at their lower ends being provided with an inwardly extending lug 34 pivotally mounted between spaced lugs 35 integrally formed at each side of member 26 by means of pins 36. The upper ends of cap halves 32 and 33 converge towards antenna 17 providing an upper opening 37 of less diameter than ball 29 and preventing thereby upward displacement of the latter.

The hinged parts 32 and 33 of the protective cap can only be opened by authorized persons who possess a key for unlocking lock 33, of any suitable construction, or if the locking is by a latch, by unlatching, perhaps from the inside of the automobile using, for instance, a remote control such as a push-pull. The fluttering of the hinged parts 32 and 33 when unlocked is prevented by springs 33 connecting halves 32 and 33 to member 26. it will be noted that in this form the cap locks the antenna in the down position and thereby makes it possible to pull out antenna 17 only after releasing locking device 38.

In other respects, the form of the invention shown in Figs. 2 and 3 is the same as that shown in Fig. l, and like reference numerals refer to like parts throughout the several views.

Referring now particularly to Figs. 4 and 5, there is shown a still further modified form of the invention, differing from the previous forms in the provision of a removable cap normally bayonet-locked to a stationary mounting base.

In this form, housing 39 replaces cap 19 of the first form and is provided at its bottom with an internally threaded bore 40 by means of which it is secured to the externally threaded end 13 of tubular member 12. The housing 39 is also provided with an upper opening 41 receiving the antenna 17 therethrough. The top of housing 39 is provided with an opening 42 which extends downwardly as enlarged opening 43 to the bottom wall 44 of housing 39.

A removable cap 45 is adapted to fit downwardly into the opening 42 of housing 39 and is provided along its lower edge at opposite sides with bayonet slots 46 adapted to engage the pins 47 secured to the lower portion of housing 39. A spring 48 is secured to the inside top of cap 45 and serves to retain the cap in the locked position, as will be obvious.

Antenna element 49 is secured to the top of cap 45, while a dummy ball end 50 is mounted on top of element 45.

In other respects the form of the invention shown in Figs. 4 and is the same as that shown in Fig. l, and like reference numerals refer to like parts throughout the several views.

Anyone trying to pull on the dummy ball end 50 in a normal manner could not unlock the cap 45. In order to do this, the cap has to be pushed down first against the pressure of spring 48 and only then is a twist possible, permitting the cap to be removed and the antenna to be pulled out.

It will be noted that this form of the invention is characterized by the use of a dummy antenna end to fool unauthorized people into pulling in the wrong direction. No key or other tool is required to unlock this form.

Referring now particularly to Fig. 6, there is shown a still further modified form of the invention, wherein a hollow, bullet-shaped cap 51 is provided at its flat bottom 52 with an internally threaded opening 53 permitting the cap 51 to be screwed onto externally threaded portion 13 of tubular member 12, the top of flat bottom 52 also having a smooth bore 54 receiving the antenna 17 therethrough. The cap 51 is locked to the portion 13 by means of a hidden screw 55 screw-threaded in bottom 52, substantially as illustrated.

In other respects, the form of the invention shown in Fig. 6 is the same as that shown in Fig. l, and like reference numerals identify like parts throughout the several views.

This form differs from the second form of the invention by the completely closed design of the protective cap 51 which not only gives better protection against tampering but also better protection against atmospheric damages such as rust, rain or the like. In this form the cap 51 is removable and normally locked in place by way of the screw 55 or any other locking device. The smaller size of the cap 51 not only makes it better looking but also makes it possible to store it in the pocket or glove compartment while using the antenna. This form of the invention, it will be noted, is characterized by the protective cap 51 which normally completely encloses the end of the antenna and makes it impossible for unauthorized persons to pull out and/ or damage the antenna 17.

Referring now particularly to Figs. 7 through 9, there is shown a still further modified form of the invention, wherein a sleeve 56 having a top wall 57 and an enlarged bottom wall 58 is provided, the bottom wall 58 having an internally threaded opening 59 permitting it to be screwed onto portion 13 of member 12.

The bottom wall 58 is also provided with a smooth bore 60 receiving the antenna 17, therethrough, the top wall 57 having a smooth bore 61 aligned with and for the same purpose as bore 60. The top wall 57 is also provided with oppositely disposed slots 62.

The antenna 17 includes an enlarged element 63 which fixedly carries the transverse pin 64 adapted to pass downwardly through the slots 62 to engage the undersurface of wall 57.

Element 65 is fixedly carried at the top of element 63, end ball 18 being provided at the top of element 65. A ring 66 is secured to the bottom of element 63, and serves to retain a compression spring 67 sleeving the antenna 17 intermediate the ring 66 and the'bottom wall 58.

Tubular element 12 is provided with a tee 68, through which extends wire 69 for connection with the car radio in the usual manner.

In other respects, the form of. the invention shown in Figs. 7-9 is the same as that shown in Fig. 1, and like reference numerals identify like parts throughout the several views.

Thus, the antenna 17 itself has a lock pin 64 and locks into the stationary slots 62. Otherwise the mechanism is similar to that of Figs. 4 and 5. Here again an upward pull does not release the antenna and not even a twist is possible. Only after pressing down and twisting can the antenna be pulled up.

This form of the invention is characterized by a lock pin 64 integral with the antenna, which leads unauthorized persons to try to pull up the antenna, without success.

It should now be apparent that for all practical purposes the foregoing devices prevent damage to radio antennas of automobiles. Emphasis has been placed on the fact that unauthorized persons who are unfamiliar with the designs, for instance, children who are mostly responsible for this kind of damage, would have to give up any attempt to tamper with the aerial because of lack of time to discover how to unlatch the various mechanisms.

While I have illustrated and described the preferred embodiments of my invention, it is to be understood that I do not limit myself to the precise constructions herein disclosed and the right is reserved to all changes and moditications coming within the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new, and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent 1. In a telescopic antenna mounted on a supporting pedestal having a central opening, a tubular base member extending through the opening in said pedestal, a cylindrical member supported on the upper end of the base member, a double ball end at the top of the antenna, a protective housing comprising a pair of hinged parts hingedly secured to opposite sides of the cylindrical member, the upper ends of said parts being swingable into engagement with the antenna intermediate the balls at said top end, said parts being hinged to the cylindrical member at their bottom ends, means for locking the upper ends of said parts about said antenna intermediate the balls on the top end of the antenna, and spring means for preventing fluttering of said hinged parts when in the unlocked position.

2. In a telescopic antenna mounted on a supporting pedestal having a central opening, a tubular base member extending through the opening in said pedestal, a cylindrical member supported on the upper end of the base member, a double ball end at the top of the antenna, a protective housing for the antenna comprising a pair of hinged parts hingedly secured to opposite sides of the cylindrical member, the upper ends of said parts converging toward each other and engaging the antenna intermediate the balls at the top end, said parts being hinged to the cylindrical member at their lower ends, locking means for securing said swung hinged parts about the top of the antenna intermediate the balls at the top of the antenna, and spring means for preventing fluttering of the hinged parts when in the unlocked position.

3. The combination of claim 1, characterized by said antenna having a double ball end, one ball of said end extending exteriorly of said housing, the other ball of said end being enclosed by said housing.

4. The combination of claim 3, characterized by lugs on the hinged parts and on the cylindrical member, said flutter preventing spring means being interposed between and secured t0 said lugs.

Rcfei'eaices Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,313,321 Carlson Mar. 9, 1943 6 Thomas Jan Vernier Dec. Schumann Jan. Freas Apr.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2313321 *Oct 14, 1940Mar 9, 1943Rca CorpAntenna
US2368174 *Aug 12, 1942Jan 30, 1945Ford Motor CoAntenna
US2491629 *Nov 13, 1945Dec 20, 1949Zenith Radio CorpAntenna
US2538885 *Jan 6, 1950Jan 23, 1951Schumann Jr William ERetractable antenna
US2636121 *Feb 14, 1949Apr 21, 1953Freas Raymond LAutomatically operated signaling apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3038567 *Nov 17, 1959Jun 12, 1962Hugo PoddigTelescoping antenna
US3084517 *Feb 18, 1960Apr 9, 1963Bell Currie GDock attachment
US7268734Feb 2, 2006Sep 11, 2007Antenex, Inc.Removable mountable aerodynamic bayonet antenna apparatus and method
US7335865 *Jun 14, 2005Feb 26, 2008Rafael-Armament Development Authority Ltd.Dome
US8085207Aug 5, 2008Dec 27, 2011Caterpillar Forest Products Inc.Antenna guard
US8299372Jun 11, 2010Oct 30, 2012Laird Technologies, Inc.Antenna universal mount joint connectors
DE1236034B *Dec 10, 1960Mar 9, 1967Hirschmann RadiotechnikVollstaendig versenkbare Teleskopantenne mit Verriegelungseinrichtung
DE2933420A1 *Aug 17, 1979Mar 6, 1980Sony CorpFahrzeugantenne
DE3314779A1 *Apr 23, 1983Sep 27, 1984Daimler Benz AgAntenna having an antenna base, which can be mounted on vehicle bodywork, and an antenna rod
Classifications
U.S. Classification343/872, 220/300, 52/110, 220/291, 343/715, 220/724
International ClassificationH01Q1/08, H01Q1/10
Cooperative ClassificationH01Q1/106
European ClassificationH01Q1/10C