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Publication numberUS2748915 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 5, 1956
Filing dateJul 6, 1954
Priority dateJul 6, 1954
Publication numberUS 2748915 A, US 2748915A, US-A-2748915, US2748915 A, US2748915A
InventorsByrnes Jr James C
Original AssigneeByrnes Jr James C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coin controlled lock mechanism
US 2748915 A
Abstract  available in
Images(12)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 5, 1956 .1. c. BYRNES, JR

com CONTROLLED LOCK MECHANISM l2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed July 6, 1954 INVENTOR 19 dimes aflyrnesfln MW flag W ATTORNEYS June 5, 1956 J. c. BYRNES, JR

COIN CONTROLLED LOCK MECHANISM 12 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed July 6, 1954 92 90 I INVENTOR 99 97.98 5 (limes U. Byrne3,rfr,

MwfiWK W2 ATTORNEYS June 5, 1956 Y J. c. BYRNES, JR 2,748,915

com CONTROLLED LOCK MECHANISM Filed July 6, 1954 I 12 Sheets-Sheet s INVENTOR ATTORNEYS June 5, 1956 J. c. BYRNES, JR 2,748,915

COIN CONTROLLED LOCK MECHANISM Filed July 6, 1954 12 Sheets-Sheet 4 FIG. 9 5 56 62 7 6'3 76 73 77 79 80 78 FIG 10 g '14 5 2 76 75 44 -v 3 77 fi xm ggo 4 "W I INVENTOR ATTORNEYS June 5, 1956 J. c. BYRNES, JR 2,748,915

COIN CONTROLLED LOCK MECHANISM Filed July 6, 1954 12 Sheets-Sheet 5 13 17 I Ugh-,2 A/+6.15. (Z6116: FIGJZ 105 Z 93 FIG. 1.9.

INVENTOR (limes (1B Jrrnesfi:

ATTORNEYS June 5, 1956 J. c. BYRNES, JR

com CONTROLLED LOCK MECHANISM l2 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed July 6, 1954 INVENTOR 1 J11 mes afi yrn s'J I:

ATTORNEYS June 5, 1956 J. c. BYRNES, JR 2,748,915

COIN CONTROLLED LOCK MECHANISM Filed July 6, 1954 12 Sheets-Sheet '7 FIGZZ INVENTOR l 330 2.122 285 J1mesC.B5/rnes,tfr.

ATTORNEYS June 5, 1956 J. C. BYRNES, JR

COIN CONTROLLED LOCK MECH ANISM l2 Sheets-Sheet 8 Filed July 6, 1954 8 AgmA/lg INVENTOR (fumes a B J ATTORNEYS 12 Sheets-Sheet 11 f kmm I N VEN TOR J. C. BYRNES, JR

COIN CONTROLLED LOCK MECHANISM zlimes 0. Byrnea; J1: BYWyM MM June 5, 1956 Filed July 6, 1954 ATTORNEYS June 5, 1956 J. c. BYRNES, JR

com CONTROLLED LOCK MECHANISM l2 Sheets-Sheet 12 Filed July 6, 1954 namww s INVENTOR q, llamas afiyrmrlk M QA KMW NW db ATTORNEYS United States Patent COIN CONTROLLED LOCK MECHANISM James C. Byrnes, Jr., Washington, D. C. Application July 6, 1954, Serial No. 441,614

21 Claims. (Cl. 194-70) This invention relates to coin controlled lock mechanism, and in particular to devices adapted to be unlocked by the agency of proper coins or slugs inserted thereinto, rather than by means of a key.

A principal object of the invention is to providea fraud and tamper proof lock mechanism, adapted when locked to receive a plurality of coins of predetermined size, which may be different, and then unlocked by rotation of an actuating shaft, the mechanism functioning to withdraw the coins into the lock interior and then utilize the coins as individual actuating elements to enable the unlocking operation, whereby it all coins are present and of proper size the unlocking operation may proceed to completion, by movement of a bolt or otherwise. The lock mechanism is at all times shielded from view and access. If unlocking operation is attempted without the proper number of proper coins, safety means precludes operation beyond a reject point, and special provision is made for returning coins so rejected.

Another object of the invention is to provide a mechanism engageable in both the locked and unlocked positions, and optionally key operated means to permit movement from unlocked position. For this aspect of the invention, novel tumbler cylinder means are provided which may look in angularly diverse positions. Special provision is made to permit removal of the key when the mechanism is in locked position.

A further object of the invention is to provide coin controlled lock mechanism operable through :the agency of a plurality of coins, and readily altered to accommodate difierent numbers of coins up to a predetermined determined maximum size. In so varying the openative number and size of coins, the mechanism may retain adjustment for locking with the same key. Alternatively, the locking key combination may be altered when the coin setting is altered, and also when the coin setting-is not altered, whereby complete versatility is achieved.

The mechanism may include a coin chamber to receive and retain coins used in succeeding operations, and separate means may be provided for access to the coin chamber. In this manner personnel having keys for locking may 'be denied access to the coins. General objects are to provide a lock mechanism of simple and durable construction, readily operable and adapted to be quickly and easily set for desired coin amount without special skill. Further objects will be in part evident and in part pointed out hereinafter. I

The invention and the novel features thereof may best be made clear by reference to the following description and the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a top plan sectional view of an illustrative embodiment of the invention, taken immediately below the top case portion thereof;

Figure 2 is an elevational sectional view, taken on the line 2-2 of Figure 1;

Figure 3 is an elevational sectional view, taken on the line 3-3 of Figure 4;

maximum, and/or coins of different sizes, up to a pre-- ice Figure 4 is an elevational sectional view, taken substantially on the line 4-4 of Figure 2;

Figure 5 is a sectional view, taken substantially on the line 5-5 of Figure 2;

Figure 6 is a fragmentary sectional view corresponding to Figure 5, but showing the tumbler cylinder in unlocked position and the operation of a key to free the tumbler cylinders from restraint in preparation for movement to locked position;

Figure 7 is an exploded perspective view of the coin cradle, coin receptacles and associated elements;

Figure 8 is an elevational view of the bar key associated with the coin cradle;

Figures 9 through 14 are corresponding fragmentary sectional views sequentially illustrating successive steps in the unlocking operation of the device;

Figure 15 is an elevational view of the selector wheel assembly;

Figure 16 is an end view of the selector wheel assembly, taken on the line 16-16 of Figure 15;

Figures 17, 18 and 19 are sectional views of the selector wheel assembly, taken, respectively, on the lines 17-17, 18-18 and 19-19 of Figure 15;

Figures 20 through 24 are diagrams of elements of the selector wheel assembly and Geneva gears cooperative therewith, sequentially illustrating successive steps in the unlocking operation of the device, corresponding more or less to the sequence illustrated in Figures 9 to 14;

Figure 25 is a diagram of elements of the selector wheel assembly and Geneva gears cooperative therewith, illustrating the coin reject function of the mechanism;

Figure 26 is a side elevational view of an alternative embodiment of the invention;

Figure 27 is a plan sectional view, taken on the lin 27-27 of Figure 26;

Figure 28 is an elevational sectional view, taken on the line 28-28 of Figure 27;

Figure 29 is a-sectional view, taken on the line 29-29 of Figure 27;

Figure 30 is a sectional view, taken on the line 30-30 of Figure 27;

Figure 31 is a sectional view, taken on the line 31-31 of Figure 27;

Figure 32 is a sectional view, taken on the line 32-32 of Figure 27;

Figure 33 is a sectional view, taken on the line 33-33 of Figure 27; V

- Figure 34'-is a sectional view, taken on the line 34-34 of-Figure 33, illustrating the tumbler cylinder drive;

Figure 35 is a sectional view, taken on the line 35-35 of Figure 33, illustrating the cradle drive;

Figure 36 is a sectional view, taken on the line 36-36 of Figure 33, illustrating the eccentric drive;

Figures 37 through 43 are diagrams of elements of the drive assembly of the embodiment of Figures 26 to 36, sequentially illustrating successive steps in the unlocking operation of the device; and

Figure 44 is a similar diagram of elements of the drive assembly, illustrating the coin reject function of the mechanism.

Referring to the drawings in detail, the illustrative embodiment shown in Figures 1 to 25 includes an outer case 10 fully enclosing the mechanism, except for a coin insertion opening 11 and. a coin return opening 12, adjoined by an external trough 13. For the purposes of assembly and access for change of setting, the case 10' may comprise a side door 14 and bottom door 15, removable but so constructed as to be releasable, when in place, only-from the inside of the case. This may be eflected by movement of a pin (not shown) or by similar conventional expedient. To provide access to the case interior for this purpose and to remove coins periodically 3 from the coin chamber 16, a small door 17 may be pivotally mounted in the back of the case, this door being provided with a conventional key lock 18 and latch 19, by means of which it may be maintained normally closed (see Figure 2).

In the side of the case opposite door 14 is formed a saddle or boss 20, which serves as a bearing support for a short actuating shaft 22, to the outer end of which is fixed a hand wheel or knob 23. Immediately inside the case wall the actuating shaft carries a drive gear 24. Gear 24 is drivingly engaged to a selector .vhcel gear 25, fixedly mounted on the selector wheel shaft 26, the outer end of which is journalled in the case wall, the inner end being journalled in the internal case wall 27. Between its ends, the shaft 26 is of square cross section and bears thereon the selector wheel assembly indicated generally as 23. The selector wheel assembly, to be described in detail hereinafter, in turn drives the cradle assembly 29 and the tumbler cylinder assembly 30, both of which mounted on axes parallel to the axis of the selector wheel shaft, in properly timed sequence.

The cradle assembly 29 is best illustrated in Figures 2, 4, and 7, and includes a generally cylindrical cradle member 32, longitudinally slotted at 33. The cradle is rotatably supported in the internal cylindrical cavity 34 formed in the case structure (see Figure 2), which cavity is open to the exterior of the case through coin openings 11 and 12. Internally, the cradle 32 is formed to special polygonal shape, adapted to receive the outer and inner cradle heads 35 and 36. As best shown in Figure 5, the outer cradle head 35 includes a boss 37 adapted to seat in journal 38 of the case side door 14, and a flange 39 adapted to limit entry of the head into the cradle. The inner cradle head 36 is similarly provided with a flange 40 to limit entry of the head into the cradle, and also with :1 Geneva gear 42 formed integral therewith or fixedly secured thereto, by means of which the cradle assembly may be rotated.

Between the cradle heads a plurality of coin receptacles or plates 43 are disposed in the cradle, these plates being laterally slidable within the cradle, the lateral movement thereof being limited in one direction by cradle shoulder 44 and in the other direction by the cradle bottom 45. The cradle heads 35 and 36 are centrally apcrtured to receive a shaft 46, which extends through the inner cradle head 36 and has fixed to the outwardly extending end thereof a Geneva gear 47. On either side of the coin plates, an eccentric 48 is non-rotatably mounted on the shaft 46, each eccentric 48 being engaged within an eccentric rod 49 (Figure 7). Between the outer ends of the eccentric rods 49 extends a bar key 50 (Figure 8), having a pro-selected unique combination of lands 52 of different heights, adapted to coact with the individual coin plates. The coin plates 43 are slotted at 53 to accommodate the key, the inner end of each slot terminating in a flat surface 54 adapted for engagement with the corresponding key land. The coin plates are also slotted at 55 to accommodate the shaft 46, while permitting lateral movement of the coin plates. The reduced end portion of each coin plate fitting within the cradle slot 33 is cut away, as at 56, to receive a coin of predetermined diameter and thickness. Blank plates 57 may be utilized in place of one or more of the coin plates 43, these plates being provided with an extended and rounded upper edge 58 rather than with a cutaway portion 56.

Adjacent the case cavity 34 and angularly offset with respect to the coin opening 11 (see Figure 5), the internal body structure of the case is bored at 59 and counterbored at 60, to accommodate a plurality of pins 62, each pin having a necked down portion 63 on the end thereof facing the cradle assembly, the portion 63 extending through the counterbore 60. One pin 62 is provided for each coin plate 43, the pin portion 63 thereof being generally aligned with the cutaway portion of one of engages a gear 83 on the bolt sleeve the coin plates when assembled in the cradle. Movement of the pins in the direction of the cradle is limited by the body shoulders 64 at the bottom of the bores 59.

On the other side of pins 62 is disposed the tumbler cylinder assembly 30. The tumbler cylinder 65 is rotatably mounted in the case, with one end journalled in the internal body opening 66 (Figures 5 and 6), the other end thereof bearing a stud 67 received and supported in a recess 68 provided therefor in the inner end of actuating shaft 22. The body opening 66 is enlarged at 69 to accommodate a gear 70 formed on or secured to that end of the tumbler cylinder. As will be evident, the axis of the tumbler cylinder 65 is parallel to the cradle axis, the axes of the bores 59 and pins 62 being coplanar therewith. Adjacent s ud 67, the tumbler cylindcr carries a Geneva gear 71, adapted to be driven in proper sequence by the selector wheel assembly, as will be explained hereinafter.

As best shown in Figures 2, 5 and 6, the tumbler cylinder 65 is provided with a plurality of transverse, longitudinally spaced bores 72, matching in number and alignment the body bores 59 and the coin plates 43. Each bore 72 opens at one end into an enlarged slot 73. Each bore 72 houses a tumbler 74, a headed pin 75, and a small spring 76 disposed between the tumbler and the headed pin and adapted to bias both outwardly. The tumbler 74, as clearly shown in Figure 2, is catendable outwardly into a bore 59, but the head of pin 75, being of greater dimension than that of bore 59, is not. However, due to the greater depth of the bore slot 73 as compared to the head of the pin, the pin 75 may be displaced inwardly a limited distance, compressing the spring 76.

In a plane radial with respect to the axis of tumbler cylinder 65, and angularly offset with respect to such axis from the plane of bores 59, in the illustrated case 180, the casing body is provided with another series of bores 77, extending from the tumbler cylinder to a key slot 78. In each bore 77 is a ball 79, the approach of which to ward the key slot 78 is limited by the body shoulder 80. and behind the ball a cylindrical pin 82.

Rotation of the tumbler cylinder is utilized to move a bolt or to effect a similar lockingunlocking action. la the illustrative embodiment, the tumbler cylinder gear 7;) 34, which is rotatal'ily mounted in the casing body below and parallel to the tumbler cylinder (see Figure l). he sleeve is restrained in any conventional manner from axial movement, and provided with an interior helical groove 85, adapted to receive a corresponding helical rib 86 extending from the cylindrical surface 87 of bolt 83. Outwardly of the cylindrical surface 87, the bolt is square or otherwise non-circular, as at 89, and extends through a corresponding open ing in the casing door 14, the bolt being axially slidablc, but restrained from rotation. As will be readily understood, rotation of the sleeve 84 through the agency of the sleeve groove 85 and the bolt rib 86 effects axial translation of the bolt, thereby effecting a locking or unlocking action. Obviously, rotational movement of the tumbler cylinder may be transmitted to a bolt in other conventional manner, as through a rack. Further, as will be evident, the bolt may be designed for unlocking and locking by means of a rotative movement. if desired.

The selector wheel assembly 28 includes, as best illustrated in Figures 4 and 15 to 19, besides the gear 25, a tumbler drive disc 99 adioined by a spacer drum 92. From the disc 90 a plurality of angularly spaced pins 93, 94 and 95 extend laterally over the spacer drum 92, these pins being adapted to engage and drive the tumbler cylinder Geneva gear 71. Adjacent each pin, the soaccr drum is cut away as at 96 to clear the teeth of the Gene a gear when the Geneva gear is rotated by the pin. in side spacer drum 92 is a key and cradle drive disc 97, adjoined on both sides by spacer drums 98 and 99. Extending from disc 97 laterally over drum 98 are a plurality of angularly spaced pins 101, 102, 103 and 104, adapted to engage and drive the Geneva gear 47, mounted on the shaft 46 by means of which bar key 50 is actuated. Laterally extending from the disc 97 over the drum 99 are a plurality of angularly spaced pins 105, 106, 107 and 108, adapted to engage and drive the Geneva gear 42 fixed to the cradle assembly. The drums 98 and 99 are cut away adjacent each pin extending thereover, in the manner of drum 92. All of these elements are constrained to rotate with the selector wheel shaft 26, by reason of engagement with the square cross-section central portion thereof.

Operation of the mechanism will now be described in detail. Figure 2 illustrates the relationship of the cradle assembly, including the bar key and associated elements, and the tumbler cylinder assembly when the mechanism is engaged in locked position, in which condition in the illustrative embodiment the bolt 88 is extended or otherwise engaged. In this position, the tumblers 74 extend into the body bores 59, and prevent movement of the tumbler cylinder and bolt.

To operate the mechanism from locked to unlocked position, a plurality of properly sized coins must be inserted into the cutaways 56 of the coin plates 43. This may be done through the coin opening 11 of the case, with which the coin plate cutaways are aligned. The lock mechanism may be designed to incorporate any desired number of coin plates, and the cutaway portions 56 thereof may vary as desired in size, so that the mechanism may be adapted for operation with any desired number of coins, of any desired size and denomination. In the example shown, six coin plates are provided, each being cut away to receive a coin of predetermined size. In Figure 1, for example, from left to right the coin plates are cut away to receive four quarters, a dime and a nickel, whereby the mechanism is set up for unlocking operation by insertion of a dollar and fifteen cents in com.

When the proper coins have been deposited, the mech anism may be actuated by continuous rotation of the actuating shaft knob 23 in constant direction, clockwise as viewed in Figure 3. Through gears 24 and 25, the entire cradle assembly 29 is first rotated clockwise to the position of Figure 9, in which position each coin will contact the end portion 63 of the corresponding pin 62. In this initial movement, the shaft 46 and associated eccentric elements rotate with the cradle.

Next, the shaft 46 turns difierentially with respect to the cradle, turning the eccentrics 48 with respect to the cradle to the relative position illustrated in Figure 10. The movement of the eccentrics is effective through the eccentric rods 49 to translate the bar key 50 laterally, in this case in the direction of the axis of the cradle assembly. Alternatively, rotary movement of the bar key may be utilized to translate the coin receptacles laterally, the bar key lands acting as cams. This may be readily afiected, for example, by transmitting the relative rotational movement of shaft 46 to the bar key through suitable gearing. The movement of the bar key effects lateral movement of the individual coin plates and the coins therein toward the pins 62, individual coin plates'being moved different distances in accordance with the elevation of the key lands 52 aligned therewith. That is, the highest possible key land will always contact the flat surface 54 of the corresponding coin plate a distance corresponding to the full translation of the bar key. A lower key land 52 will move a short distance before engaging the corresponding coin plate surface, and will thereafter move the coin plate only the balance of the bar key travel.

Each coin engages and displaces the portion 63 of the aligned pin 62, and through pin 62 the aligned tumbler 74, compressing the tumbler spring 76, to precise position whereat the tumbler is disengaged from bore 59 and the tumbler cylinder is freed from restraint thereby.- The pins 62, it will be noted, differ in length, the length of each being selected in accordance with the elevation of the corresponding key land, whereby the bar key employed in an individual mechanism and the set of pins 62 employed therewith represent a unique combination.

Desirably, in each coin plate the distance from the slot surface 54 to the outer periphery of the proper coin for which the plate is cut away (dimension A in Figure 9) is a constant, whereby the coin plates are interchangeable and the mechanism may be adjusted for operation by coins of dilferent number and/or size by merely substituting a different series of coin plates. If the number of coins to be utilized is to be reduced, a coin plate 43 may be replaced by a blank plate 57, in which the distance from the slot surface 54 to the upper edge 53 corresponds to the dimension A previously noted, so that the edge 58 of the blank plate may function as a coin to actuate the corresponding pin 62. In Figure 10, the bar key 50 has completed its movement, and all pins 62 and tumblers 74 have been aligned to release the tumbler cylinder. The

particular coin plate shown in Figure 10 has been trans-' lated laterally the maximum possible distance, representing alignment with a key land 52 of maximum elevation and a pin 62 of minimum length. A key land of a lesser elevation would translate the coin plate to a final position intermediate that of Figure 9 and that of Figure 10, which final position would also properly align the abutting faces of pin 62 and tumbler "74 with the periphery of the tumbler cylinder 65, due to the provision in such case of a pin 62 of correspondingly greater length.

Proper alignment of all the tumblers 74 to free the tumbler cylinder depends, of course, on the presence of a coin of proper diameter in the cutaway portion 56 of each coin plate 43. If any coin is missing or of too small diameter, the tumbler cylinder will not be disengaged, and the unlocking operation may not proceed beyond the stage of Figure 10. Coins of greater than desired diam eter may not be inserted initially into the coin plate cutaways. In case of rejection due to absent or undersized coins, the action must be reversed to the initial starting position of Figure 2 and beyond until the coins are aligned with the case opening 12, whereupon they drop out into the trough 13. The return action is effected by continuous rotation of the actuating knob 23 in opposite direction. A detailed description of the reject and return function appears hereinafter.

If the proper number of properly sized coins is present, the sequential unlocking operation may proceed. The next step is the rotation of the freed tumbler cylinder, to the position illustrated in Figure 11, the cradle assembly remaining stationary and the coins remaining in selectively extended positions during the initial movement of the tumbler cylinder, at least until the tumblers '74 have cleared the bores 59.

Thereafter, the tumbler cylinder continues its rotation, and the cradle assembly resumes its rotation, the shaft 46 remaining stationary. Dilferential movement between the cradle and shaft 46 effects retraction of the bar key 50 and the coin plates as the cradle rotates, the outer edges of the coin plates and coins therein following closely the spiral surface 112 formed in the body (see Figure 2). An intermediate point in this action is illustrated in Figure 12, wherein the cradle has rotated approximately 45 from the position of Figure 11, and the key and coin plates have been partially returned to retracted position.

The rotation of the cradle proceeds to the final position illustrated in Figure 13, wherein the bar key and coin plates are completely retracted, and the coins are aligned with the coin chamber 16 and free to drop thereinto. It will be noted that the cradle reaches its final position and the coins are dropped before the tumbler cylinder bores 72 reach alignment with the bores 77. This insures that the coins are dropped from the coin 7 plates before the unlocking operation is completed, in this case before the bolt 83 completes its operative throw. The close fit of spiral surface 112 insures that dropped coins may not reenter the cradle cavity 34 to jam the mechanism.

The cradle then remaining static-oar, the tumbler cylindcr continues to rotate to its final position in alignment with the bores 77, at which position the springs 76 force the tumblers 74 into bores 77. At this point, the bolt completes its operative throw, and the uniocking operation is completed. It will be noted that the tumbiers 74 have a dual function, and serve to engage the bolt actuating tumbler cylinder in both locked and unlocked position. That is, from the final unlocked position illustrated in Figure 14, the mechanism may not be moved by means of the actuating knob 23 until the umblers have been disengaged from bores 77, in this case by means of a proper key inserted into key slot 78. The headed pins 75 serve to back the springs '76, but due to their enlarged end configuration are unable to enter bores 59 and 77, whereby the headed pins 75 may freely traverse over said bores.

The illustrative embodiment is adapted to be disengaged for unlocking only by means of a key 113, which may be of conventional type. This disengaging action is illustrated in Figure 6, wherein the key 113 is shown in inserted position. The pins 82 in bores 77, as clearly shown in Figure 6, are of different lengths, and selected in accordance with the configuration of key 113, so that when the key is fully inserted, the pins 82 will each be displaced the precise distance necessary to line up the tumblers 74 with the periphery of the tumbler cylinder, whereby the tumbler cylinder is freed. The springs 76 permit temporary displacement of individual pins 82 to a position further inward than that illustrated in Figure 6, to permit insertion of the key. The pins 8.2 and the key 113, as will be evident, represent another unique combination incorporated into the individual locking mechanism.

With the key 113 in place, the actuating knob 23 may be rotated in direction opposite to that employed in unlocking, and the mechanism may be actuated through the reverse of the sequence previously described to the final locked position of Figure 2. in the locking operation, when the tumbler cylinder reaches the position of Figure 10, the tumblers 74 will be forced outwardly into the bores 59 to thereby again engage the mechanism in locked position, whereby the tumbler cylinder and the bolt may not be moved until the tumbler cylinder is again freed through the agency of proper coins. To enable the locking operation, it will be understood, the key 113 need not be turned or otherwise manipulated, but merely inserted longitudinally. \Vhen the tumbler cylinder reaches the position of Figure and engages in locked position. the key may be Withdrawn, the enlarged slots 73 permitting inward movement of the headed pins 75 as necessary to release tne key.

In the illustrative embodiment, the bores 59 and 77 are angularly spaced apart 180. The angular movement of the cradle and tumbler cylinder from unlocked to locked position is also 180". The cradle is designed to rotate 90 from the coin insertion opening 11 to line up with pins 62 and the tumbler cylinder. These and other angular and positional relationships, of course, are not critical, and may be varied by design within the scope of the invention.

While the tumbler bores 72 and enlarged slots 73 are conveniently aligned, they need not be. The tumblers 74 and headed pins 75 may be disposed at right angles to each other, or in other angular relationship, and each biased outwardly by individual springs or resilient elements. By these expcdients, considerable freedom in positioning the key slot 78 may be gained.

The above-described sequence of operations is effected by rotation of the selector wheel assembly 28, driving the cradle Geneva gear 42, the key shaft Geneva gear 47, and tumbler Geneva gear 71. The operative disposition of the Geneva gears and the associated elements of the selector wheel asembly is sequentially illustrated in Figures 20 to 25. Figure 20 corresponds to the locked position relationship of the mechanism illustrated in Figure 2 of the drawings. Each part of the figure is here viewed as from right-hand side of Figure 15, looking toward the left-hand side thereof. The left-hand portion of Figure 20 illustrates the relationship of the key and cradle drive disc 97 and its pins 105, 106, 107 and 108 to cradle Geneva gear 42. The Geneva gear, it will be noted, has three deep slots 114, 115 and 116, and a relatively shallow lock slot 117, all of the slots being spaced apart angularly and separated by convex surfaces 11.8 corresponding in radius to that of the drum 99.

The center portion of Figure 20 illustrates the relationship of the key and cradle drive disc 97 and its pins 101, 102, 103 and 104 to the bar key actuating Geneva gear 47, which may be identical with Geneva gear 42.

The right-hand diagram of Figure 20 illustrates the relationship of the tumbler drive disc 90 and its pins 93, 94 and to the tumbler Geneva gear 71. The Geneva gear 71 comprises three closely spaced slots 119, 120 and 121, separated by convex lands 118, and provided immediately adjacent and outside of slots 119 and 121 with convex riding surfaces 122, also matching in radius the drum 92, the riding surfaces 122 being angularly separated 180. The vertical arrows in each component represent the relative relationships thereof.

In the unlocking operation to the point illustrated in Figure 9, the selector wheel assembly and the drive discs thereof are rotated counterclockwise approximately 60, to the position illustrated in Figure 2]. in this movement, pin 105 of drive disc 97 in conjunction with slot 114 rotates the Geneva gear 42 in ciockwise direction 90, and pin 101 similarly rotates gear 47 90 in the same direction, whereby the cradle assembly and the shaft 46 attain the position indicated in Figure 9. This counterclockwise movement of the tumbler drive disc 90 does not affect the position of the tumbler Geneva gear 71, the gear surface 122 merely riding on the periphcry of drum 92.

The next sequential steps in thc unlocking operation are the relative rotation of shaft 46 and its eccentrics 48 to translate the coin plates laterally, and the following initiation of turning movement by the so-[rced tumbler cylinder, Figure 22 illustrates the relationship of the various elements when a position corresponding substantially to that of Figure 11 is reached. The selector wheel assembly, it will be noted, has been rotated counterclockwise an additional 60 from the position of Figure 21, or a total of approximately 120. Pin 102 of the drive disc 97 meeting slot 115 of Geneva gear 47 has rotated gear 47 another 90 clockwise, while no corresponding movement of the Geneva gear 42 takes place. That is, Geneva gear 42 rides on drum 99 during this movement, disengaged from all pins. immediately after the 90 movement of gear 47 is completed, pin 93 of the tumbler drive disc 90 engages slot 119 of the tumbler Geneva gear 71, and initiates rotation thereof, assuming proper coins have freed the tumbler cylinder. As illustrated in Figure 22, in the left-hand portion pin 106 is approaching gear 42 to initiate further movement thereof, gear 47 has rotated a total of 113i and is now riding on drum 98, and pin 93 has moved gear 71 only slightly in clockwise direction.

Further movement of the selector wheel assembly in counterclockwise direction causes pin 106 to rotate gear 42 a further 90, while gear 47 remains stationary. Meanwhile, the clockwise rotation of gear 71 and the associated tumbler cylinder continues. Figure 23 illustrates the positional relationships of the elements which corresponds substantially to Figure 13. Differential movement between shaft 46 and the cradle causes full retraction of the bar key and coin plates as previously noted. Meanwhile, pins 93, 94 and 95 have rotated tumbler gear 71 and the tumbler cylinder a total of perhaps 150. The coins, then, reach the drop out position of Figure 13 immediately prior to completion of the unlocking operation.

Figure 24 illustrates the final unlocked position of the mechanism, corresponding substantially to Figure 14. The selector wheel assembly has rotated slightly from the position of Figure 23, the Geneva gears 42 and 47 remaining stationary, however, riding respectively drums 99 and 98. The final movement of the selector wheel assembly, however, by means of pin 95 rotates gear 71 until its riding surface 122 is in contact with drum 92, in which final position it has been rotated exactly 180 from initial position. In such position, the bolt completes its operative throw and the tumblers "74 enter bores 77, engaging the mechanism against further movement in either direction until released or freed by insertion of the key 113. The tumblers 74, then, terminate the unlocking operation in positive fashion.

The locking operation is the reverse of the foregoing, the selector wheel, Geneva gears and associated elements moving sequentially from the relationship illustrated in Figure 24 through the relationships of Figures 23, 22 and 21 to the final locked position of Figure 20, at which the mechanism again engages.

As previously indicated, if any coin is absent or undersized, the operation may not proceed to the relationship illustrated in Figure 22. That is, if any tumbler 74 is not released from a bore 59, the tumbler cylinder and the tumbler gear 71 may not be turned from the position indicated in Figures 20 and 21. The tumbler cylinder remains effectively engaged at such position, and the actuating shaft knob 23 may not be further turned, effecting a positive rejection. In case of such rejection, the selector wheel assembly may be caused to rotate in opposite (clockwise) direction, whereby such coins or slugs as are in the coin plates may be returned.

Clockwise rotation of the selector wheel assembly from reject position will first return the elements to the position illustrated in Figures 2 and 20. Further rotation of the selector wheel assembly in clockwise direction will cause pins 107 and 103 to engage the slots 116 of gears 42 and 47, respectively, and rotate the gears in counterclockwise direction. In this action, shaft 46 turns with the cradle, so that no relative movement of the coin plates occurs. In this manner, the coins are again displaced from alignment with the coin insertion opening 11 without disclosing to observation the bar key combination. As the selector wheel assembly turns clockwise 60 from the position of Figure 20, the gears 42 and 47 are rotated counterclockwise 90. Further clockwise rotation of the selector wheel assembly results in entrance of pins 198 andltM into the shallow lock slots 117 of gears 42 and 47, and thereby effects further counterclockwise movement of the Geneva gears an additional 15 or so, into alignment with the coin return opening 12, whereupon the coins may fall by gravity into the return trough 13. At .this point, pins 108 and 104 engage the shallow bottoms of the lock slots 117, thereby positively terminating the return action and precluding further rotation of the cradle assembly in that direction. The return movement of the selector wheel assembly does not affect the tumbler Geneva gear 71, which merely rides the surface of drum 92. The final return position of the involved elements is illustrated in Figure 25. After return of the rejected coins, the action of the selector wheel assembly may be again reversed by means of the actuating shaft knob, and the mechanism returned to the relationship illustrated in Figures 2 and 20, the lock remaining engaged in locked position, but ready for insertion of proper coins for unlocking. v

"The lock mechanismmay be readily altered, within its design limits, for operation by means of a different number of coins, or by means of coins or slugs of different size. For this purpose, it is necessary only to change the coin plates, which may be accomplished readily and quickly. The side door 14 of the case may be released from inside the case, access being gained through the back door 17, and then removed. Next, the outer cradle head 35 may be removed, and thereafter the outer eccentric 48 and eccentric rod 49. The coin plates may now be dropped out of the otherwise assembled mechanism, and replaced by others cut away to accommodate coins of different sizes. If the mechanism is to be adapted for operation by a lesser number of coins, one or more coin plates may be replaced by blank coin plates 57. With the new coin plates inserted, the eccentric and eccentric rod may be replaced, and thereafter the cradle head and the side wall of the case.

It will be understood that such replacement of coin plates does not disturb the combination of the bar key 50 and the pins 62, since all coin plates with proper coins therein and all blank plates are functionally equivalent as previously explained. If it be desired at any time to change the combination of the bar key 5t and pins 62, the mechanism must be disassembled to a greater degree, whereupon the bar key may be replaced by another key having different land configuration, and a corresponding set of pins 62 inserted at the same time. This may be done coincidentally with a change in coin plates, or without changing the coin plates. Similarly, the unique combination represented by the key 113 and the pins 82 may be altered in any individual mechanism when desired. This requires merely replacement of the pins 82 with another set, corresponding to another key 113. In such manner, complete versatility and adaptability of the mechanism is achieved.

Throughout the operation of the mechanism, only the coin plates and cradle member are open to view and access. All movements of the locking and unlocking operations are completely shielded. The tumbler cylinder and its tumblers are removed from the case openings, and quite inaccessible, so that no fraudulent release or operation thereof is possible. Damage to or destruction of the coin plates and associated cradle elements leaves the tumbler cylinder and the locking function of the mechanism intact.

An alternative embodiment of the invention is illustrated in Figures 26 through 4-4, wherein the principles of the invention are exemplified in different mechanism. This embodiment includes an enclosing body or case 219, provided with a coin insertion opening 211, acoin return opening 212, and a coin release opening 213, see Figure 28. For ease of assembly and changing the coin plates, the case may include a side door 214 (Figure 27), preferably round and removably engaged to the case by threads 215. The opposite side of the case may comprise a cover 216, secured in place when assembled in any conventional fashion, preferably by permanent or at any rate tamper-proof means.

The case comprises an internal cylindrical cavity 217, with which the openings 211, 212 and 213 communicate. Coaxially disposed in cavity 217 is a cradle assembly including a generally U-shaped, outwardly cylindrical cradle body 218 (Figure 28). The cradle body 218 is adjoined at one end by an inner cradle head 219 from which extends an axial shaft 220, the outer end of the shaft being supported in recess-222 of the cover 215, preferably by means of a conventional anti-friction hearing. The other end of cradle body 218 is adjoined by an outer cradle head, 223, from which extends an axial shaft224, the outer end ofWhich is journalled in recess 225 of side door 214, also preferably with an intermediate anti-friction bearing. Immediately'adjacent and outside the inner cradle head- 219, shaft 220 carries a cradle headgear 226. By means of screws or bolts 227 (Figure 28) extending therethrough, or in similar conventional fashion,

11 the cradle body, cradle heads and cradle head gear are joined as a unitary assembly.

The cover 216 serves as a bearing support for a stub actuating shaft 228 which extends therethrough, carrying on its outer end a handle 229 and on its inner end a drive pinion 230 (Figure 27). The drive pinion 23d engages and drives a selective drive assembly including drive gear 232, tumbler cylinder gear 233, tumbler cyl1nder drum 234, cradle and eccentric drum 235 and cradle and eccentric gear 236. The elements of the selective drive assembly are joined together as a unit as by bolts 237, the assembly being, however, rotatable on shaft 226.

Adjacent cradle and eccentric gear 236 an eccentric drive gear 238 is rotatably mounted on shaft 223-. To the outer side of eccentric drive gear 238, as by rivets 239, is an eccentric 24S) (Figures ..7 and 29), vi; .r'n carries on its outer side an integral or fixedly secured pinion 242, the pinion being coaxial with the eccentric drive gear and shaft 220. The eccentric drive gear, eccentrio and pinion. then constitute an eccentric sub-assembly which is drilled at 243 to enclose shaft 220 and turn freely thereon. The eccentric 240 is enclosed by an eccentric rod 24- rotatably mounted thereon.

Adjacent side door 214 a similar eccentric 240 is rotatably mounted on shaft 224, with its pinion 242, however. oppositely disposed. This eccentric is similarly enclosed by an eccentric rod 244, and the outer ends of the eccentric rods carry between them a bar key 245. The eccentrics are mechanically linked by a shaft 246 extending through bore 247 of the cradle body (Figure 28), each end of the shaft 246 having a pinion 24S fixed thereto (Figure 29) and engaged to the corresponding eccentric pinion 242. In this manner the eccentrics are constrained to rotate in unison, and both may be driven by the eccentric drive gear 238.

in the cradle body 218 are positioned a pluraiity of coin plates 249 (Figure 28), shaped exteriorly to cor- ;nond to the interior and bottom of the cradle body. leach coin plate is slotted at 256 to accommodate bar -key 245, and on its upper surface longitudinally grooved at 251 to partially receive a coin or slug of specific thickness and diameter. Above each coin plate is disposed a coin plate cap 252, longitudinally slotted at to receive and enclose a coin of the size for which the corresponding coin plate is adapted. The coin plates and caps are retained in place by a lock plate 254, fitting over the truncated upper surface of the outer cradle head 223, and secured to the inner cradle head 2L9 by bolts or screws 255 extending through the caps 252 into the inner cradle head. As best seen in Figure 27, five coin plates and caps are provided in this embodiment, slotted to receive, for the purpose of illustration and reading from top to bottom, a quarter, penny, nickel, dime and quarter, or a total of sixty-six cents in coin. As in the previous embodiment described, one or more coin plates may be replaced by a blank coin plate (not shown) having an upper surface suitably spaced from the slot 25% to simulate a coin in place in the coin plate.

At one side of the cradle body. the case 210 is provided with a plurality of interior bores 256, corresponding in number and alignment with the coin plates 249, or more particularly, with the coin plate cap slots 253. Each bore 256 houses an actuating pin 257. As in the embodiment previously described, the bar key 245 is pro yidcd with a plurality of lands, live in the present instance, of different heights, and the actuating pins differ correspondingly in length, whereby the bar key and pins together constitute a unique combination. The bores 256 communicate with a cylindrical body recess 253 in which is housed the tumbler cylinder assembly. As best shown in Fig re 27, the tumbler cylinder assembly comprises the tumbler cylinder 259 and support shafts 269 and 262 extending axially from the ends thereof. Shaft 26!) is supported in recess 263 of the body cover 216, and shaft 12 262 is supported in the body recess 264, each of these recesses housing preferably a suitable anti-friction bearing enclosing the supported shaft.

The tumbler cylinder 259 is provided preferably with a plurality of transverse, longitudinally spaced bores 265, matching in number and alignment the bores 256, each tumbler cylinder bore opening at one end into an enlarged slot 266. The enlarged slotted end of each bore 265 houses a headed pin 267, the bore housing a tumbler 26 and a small spring 269 is interposed between the or and the headed pin to bias both outwardly. Adjacent the tumbler cylinder and opposite bores 256 a key housing 270 is incorporated into the case, the key housing including a key slot 272 adapted to receive a conventional key 273 (Figure 27) and a plurality of bores 27; aligned with bores 256. Each bore 274 houses key in 275 having a rounded inner end 276, adapted p to be engaged and displaced by the irregular key edge 277.

As shown in Figures 26 and 27, a bolt 278 is slidably mounted in case 210 at right angles to the axis of the tumbler cylinder. The inner end of the bolt is transversely slotted at 279, and this slot is engaged by an cecentric pin 280 eccentrically mounted on and extending from the outer end of the tumbler cylinder support shaft 262.

Parallel to the axis of the cradle assembly and adjacent the peripheries of the elements of the selective drive assembly on shaft 220 are disposed three small diameter drive shafts 282, 283 and 284. One end of each drive shaft is rotatably supported in the case cover 216, preferably by means of an anti-friction bearing, and the other shaft ends are similarly supported in the body of the case, substantially opposite the inner cradle head 21). As best shown in Figure 33, the tumbler cylinder drive shaft 282 is angularly spaced from the cradle drive shaft 283 approximately and similarly spaced from the eccentric drive shaft 284, the drive shafts 283 and 284 being spaced apart approximately 60.

The tumbler cylinder drive shaft 282 carries a pinion 235 aligned to mesh with the tumbler cylinder gear 233 (see Figure 34) and a lock pinion 286 of three-tooth or t configuration, adapted to ride the surface of the tumbler cylinder drum 234 (Figure 32). Pinion 285 is engaged also to an angularly offset gear 287 (see Figure 33) rotatably mounted on a stud shaft 288 projecting from the case cover 216, and the gear 287 is engaged to a similar gear 239 fixedly mounted on the tumbler cylinder shaft 260. The tumbler cylinder gear 233 is drivingly engaged in this manner to the tumbler cylinder.

The cradle drive shaft 283 (Figure 35) carries a pinion 290 aligned to mesh with the cradle head gear 226, a similar pinion 292 aligned to mesh with the cradle and eccentric gear 236, and a lock pinion 293 adapted to ride the surface of the cradle and eccentric drum 235.

Referring to Figure 36, the eccentric drive shaft 284 carries pinions 294 and 295, adapted to mesh, respectively, with eccentric drive gear 238 and cradle and eccentric gear 236, and a lock pinion 296 aligned with the cradle and eccentric drum 235.

The operation of the alternative embodiment will be described in connection with the diagrams of Figures 37 to 44 inclusive. Figure 37 illustrates the relative disposition of various elements of the mechanism when the mechanism is engaged in locked position and ready for the reception of coins. This will correspond, normally, to extended position of the bolt 278. As illustrated in portion A of Figure 37, the coin plate caps 252 are aligned with coin insertion opening 211 of the case, the bar key 245 is in retracted position, and the tumblers 268 extend under the impetus of springs 269 into the bores 256. The tumblers maintain the actuating pins 257 in riding contact with the outer surface of the cradle assembly. Referring to portion B of the same figure, it will be seen that the eccentric rods 244 are angularly aligned to correspond to the retracted position of the bar key, the eccentrics 240 being angulated with respect to a plane of reference including the axes of the cradle head shafts and the bar key by approximately 60 in counterclockwise direction as viewed.

Portion C of Figure 37 indicates the cradle and eccentric gear 236, which is provided with twenty-eight teeth angularly spaced apart In other words, the gear teeth of this gear extend about 280 of the gear periphery, the remainder of the gear periphery being free of teeth or undercut as shown. If the counterclockwise end tooth 297 of the cradle and eccentric gear 236 be considered as the first tooth, and the clockwise end tooth 298 of the gear be considered the twentyeighth tooth, it will be seen that in this position a tooth of the pinion 295 on the eccentric drive shaft 284 is engaged between the eighteenth and nineteenth teeth of gear 236, and a tooth of the pinion 292 on the cradle drive shaft 283 is engaged between the twelfth and thirteenth teeth of gear 236. Thepinions 285, 290, 292, 294 and 295 are preferably of minimum size, and may comprise merely six teeth as shown. The lock pinions 296, 293 and 296 may correspond to the adjacent sixtooth pinions, having, however, alternate teeth cut away to effect a Y configuration for purpose presently apparent.

Portion D of Figure 37 illustrates the cradle and eccentric drum 235, which is provided with an elevated riding surface 299 of 80 angular extent, and it is for the remainder of its periphery cut away at least sufliciently to clear the teeth of lock pinions 293 and 296. The riding surface 299 of drum 235 is angularly aligned with that portion of gear 236 which is free of teeth. As indicated, the drum 235 is adjoined by lock pinions 296 and 293, mounted respectively on eccentric drive shaft 284 and cradle drive shaft 283. In the illustrated positional relationship, the lock pinions 296 and 293 are capable of rotating freely with respect to the drum.

Referring next to the tumbler cylinder drum 234, illustrated in Figure 37 portion E, this drum comprises an elevated riding surface 300 of approximately 280 angular extent, being suitably cut away along the remainder of its periphery. In the initial position described, this drum is disposed as shown, with its riding surface 300 engaging adjacent teeth of the locking pinion 286 carried by the tumbler cylinder drive shaft 282, whereby the lock pinion 286 and the shaft 282 are prevented from turning. Figure 37 portion F illustrates the configuration and initial position of the tumbler cylinder gear 233, which is provided with eight teeth spaced apart 10, the remainder of its periphery being free of teeth or cut away. The eight teeth of'gear 233 are aligned with the cut-away portion of drum 234 intermediate the ends of its riding surface 300. The gear 233 is aligned with the pinion 285 mounted on the tumbler cylinder drive shaft 282, and in the relationship illustrated the gear 233 may rotate a limited distance without engaging and turning pinion 285. Vertical arrows in portions C, D, E and F indicate the corresponding positions of gear 236, drum 235, drum 234 and gear 233.

While the mechanical components thereof are diverse, operation of the alternative embodiment of the mechanism corresponds essentially to .that of the embodiment first described. When the proper number of properly sized coins or slugs has been inserted into the coin plate slots, or more particularly into the coin plate caps, the mechanism may be unlocked by means of handle 229, rotated continuously in counterclockwise direction as viewed in Figure 26. Rotation of the handle 229 through the agency of shaft 228 and drive pinion 230 effects clockwise rotation of the selective drive assembly. The initial movement of selective drive assembly is to displace the coins from alignment with'the coin insertion opening 211 into alignment with the actuating pins 257. Figure 38 illus-- trates the positional relationship of the various elements after the selective drive assembly has been rotated clockwise from the position of Figure 37.

Referring first to Figure 38 portion C, it will be seen that the cradle and eccentric gear 236 has advanced in clockwise direction 120, or to the extent of twelve teeth. This movement, as indicated in Figure 35, is transmitted through pinion 292, cradle drive shaft 283 and pinion 290 to the cradle head gear 226, whereby the cradle has been correspondingly rotated 120 in the same direction, moving the coins therein, as shown in Figure 38 portion A, into alignment with the actuating pins 257. It will be noted that in this movement the end tooth 297 of gear 236 just passes pinion 292, and the elevated riding surface 299 of drum 235 (Figure 38 portion D) has just come into locking relationship with the lock pinion 293 of the cradle drive shaft 283.

As also shown in Figure 38 portion C, the same movement of gear 236 rotates the pinion 295 on the eccentric drive shaft 284, and through pinion 294 (see Figure 36) on the same shaft correspondingly rotates the eccentric drive gear 238, so that the relative relationship of the cradle and the eccentrics 240 is unchanged, as indicated (Figure 38 portion B).

This initial movement of the selective drive assembly does not effect any movement of the tumbler cylinder drive shaft 282, since its pinion 285 is not engaged by the teeth of gear 233, and its locking pinion 286 rides the elevated surface 300 of drum 234, see Figure 38 portions E and F.

Continued rotation of the operating handle 229 in the same direction effects the next sequential operation, in the course of which the selective drive assembly is rotated in clockwise direction an additional 60. The relative position of the various elements at the termination of this stage of the operation is illustrated in Figure 39. Referring first to portion C of this figure, it will be seen that the cradle drive shaft 283 remains stationary, because its pinion 292 is not engaged by the teeth of gear 236, and its locking pinion (portion D) is engaged by and thereby precluded from rotation by the riding surface 299 of drum 235. Accordingly, the cradle is maintained stationary during this stage of the operation.

Referring further to Figure 39 portion C, the trailing six teeth of gear 236 rotate pinion 295 of the eccentric drive shaft 284, whereby the drive shaft and its pinion 294 (see Figure 36) rotate one revolution and pinion 294 rotates the eccentric drive gear 233 and its eccentric 240 approximately 60. This differential rotation of the eccentrics 240 with respect to the cradle is indicated in Figure 39 portion B, and is effective through the eccentric rods 244 to displace the bar key 245 inwardly toward the axis of the cradle assembly. As in the previous embodiment, and referring to Figure 39 portion A, this displacement of the bar key effects displacement of the individual coin plates and the coins therein difierent distances toward the actuating pins 257. Each pin 257 being suitably dimensioned with respect to the aligned land of the bar key, each coin plate and coin displaces the aligned actuating pin 257 the precise distance necessary for the actuating pin to free the abutting tumbler 268. In such manner, the tumbler cylinder 259 is freed from restraint by its tumblers, and disengaged from locked position. It will be noted that at the termination of this stage, the end tooth 297 of gear 236 has just passed pinion 295, and the riding surface 299 of drum 235 has just engaged the associated lock pinion 296 on the eccentric drive shaft 284. Meanwhile, the tumbler drive shaft 282 still remains stationary, although at the endof this stage the riding surface 300 of the tumbler cylinder drum 234 is about to disengage from lock pinion 286, and the teeth of the tumbler cylinder gear 233 are about to engage the associated pinion 285 on the tumbler cylinder drive shaft 282.

Next in the sequence of operations is the initial-movement of the now freed tumbler cylinder from locked position. Figure 40 illustrates the relationship of the elements when the selective drive assembly has rotated in clockwise direction an additional from the position of Figure 39. Referring to Figure portions C and D, it will be seen that in this movement cradle drive shaft 283 and eccentric drive shaft 234 remain stationary, since both lock pinions 293 and 296 are engaged by the surface 299 of drum 235, while the pinions 292 and 295 are dis engaged from the teeth of gear 236. The leading end tooth 293, however, has now moved into position to engage pinion 292, and the surface 299 is in position to disengage the lock pinion 293 immediately upon further clockwise movement.

At the same time, the lock pinion 286 on the tumbler cylinder drive shaft 282 is disengaged by the riding surface 300 of drum 234, and the associated pinion 235 engaged and rotated by the leading two teeth of gear 233 (Figure 4G portions E and F). The rotation of the tumbler cylinder drive shaft 282 is transmitted through gears 237 and 289 to the tumbler cylinder shaft 260 (see Figure 33}. The gears 287 and 289 having each sixteen teeth, the resulting rotation of the tumbler cylinder will be as illustrated in Figure 40 portion A.

The tumbler cylinder and its tumblers having rotated out of alignment with bores 256 and its actuating pins 257, rotation of the cradle may now proceed. This is effected by further rotation in clockwise direction of the selective drive assembly, and Figure 41 illustrates the relationship of the elements when the selective drive as se ibly has rotated a further 60.

This stage of the operation, referring to Figure 41 portions C and D, elfects clockwise rotation of the cradle 60 into alignment with the coin release opening 213, through which the coins may drop out, this embodiment differing from that previously described in that no coin receiving chamber is provided. The cradle is rotated by engagement of gear tooth 296 and the following five teeth of gear 236 with the pinion 292 on the cradle drive shaft 283, the resulting revolution of the cradle drive shaft being efiective as previously explained to rotate the cradle. Meanwhile, pinion 295' is disengaged from gear 236, and its associated lock pinion 296 rides surface 299 of drum 235, whereby the eccentric drive shaft 284 is maintained stationary. The resulting differential movement between the cradle and the eccentrics 240 effects retraction of the bar key 245, as indicated in Figure 41 portions A and B.

The same movement of the selective drive assembly causes the trailing six teeth of gear 233 to rotate pinion 235 and the tumbler cylinder drive shaft 282 one revolution, the locking pinion 286 being disengaged from surface 30f) of drum 234 (Figure 41 portions E and F). The rotational movement of the tumbler cylinder drive shaft 282 is transmitted through gears 287 and 289 (Figure 33) to the tumbler cylinder shaft 260, whereby the tumbler cylinder 259 is rotated in clockwise direction 135 from the position of Figure 40 portion A. This movement of the tumbler cylinder brings its tumblers 263 into alignment with the body bores 274, and the tumblers 263 are forced outwardly thercinto by their springs 269. in such manner, the tumbler cylinder engages in unlocked position, and the unlocking operation is completed.

As in the previous embodiment, the mechanism is adapted for disengagement from unlocked position by means of a conventional key. Figure 42 portion A illustrates the key 273 in place in key slot 272. As will be evident, the key 273 is inserted longitudinally into the key slot, the rounded ends 276 of the key pins 275 engaging the key edge 277 as it enters. Individual key pins 275 may move temporarily into the tumbler bores 265 to pass high points of the key edge. When the key is fully inserted, its edge will properly position each key pin 275 so that the abutting surfaces of the key pins 275 and the tumblers 265 will coincide with the periphery of the tumbler cylinder, whereby the tumbler cylinder and its tumblers are disengaged from the body bores 274 and the mechanism is freed for movement to locked position.

With the key 27 3 in place, the operating handle 229 may be rotated in direction opposite to that employed in unlocking, and the mechanism actuated thereby through the reverse of the sequence described in the foregoing to the locked position of Figure 37. In the locking operation, when the tumbler cylinder reaches the position of Figure 39, the tumblers 268 will be forced outwardly into the body bores 256 to thereby again engage the mechanism in locked position, whereafter the tumbler cylinder and the bolt may not be moved until the tumbler cylinder is again reed through the agency of proper coins.

When the tumbler cylinder has reached the position of engagement in locked position, the key 273 may be withdrawn from key slot 272. For this purpose, the headed pins 267 may be displaced inwardly into the enlarged slots 266 of the tumbler cylinder, permitting the key pins 275 to enter the enlarged slots 266 as necessary to pass high points on the key edge. Figure 43 portion A illustrates this action. The rounded edge 276 of an illustrative key pin 275 is shown in contact with a high point of the edge of the key 273 during its withdrawal, the inner end of the key pin extending slightly into the enlarged slot 266, and the headed pin 277 being displaced inwardly in said slot from its normal position.

In attempting to unlock the mechanism from the position of Figure 37, if any coin is absent or undersized in the cradle, the operation may not proceed beyond the relationship illustrated in Figure 39. This will be evident, since if any tumbler 268 is not released from the aligned body bore 256, the tumbler cylinder remains effectively engaged, and the actuating shaft 228 may not be further turned. In this manner, a positive rejection is effected clearly perceptible to the operator. In the case of such rejection, the selector wheel assembly may be rotated in the opposite (counterclockwise) direction, to return such coins or slugs as are in the coin plates. From reject position (Figure 39) the mechanism is reversed through the intermediate stage of Figure 38 to the initial starting position of Figures 37 and 43, and therebeyond to the coin return position illustrated in Figure 44.

Referring to portions C and D of Figure 44, it will be seen that counterclockwise movement of the selective drive assembly from the position of Figures 37 and 43 results in rotation of the pinions 292 and 295 by the teeth of the cradle and eccentric gear 236, thereby rotating the cradle drive shaft 283 and the eccentric drive shaft 284 to rotate the cradle and the eccentrics 240 100 in counterclockwise direction from the position indicated in Figure 43 portion A to the position indicated in Figure 44 portion A, whereby any coins present in the cradle are brought into alignment with the coin reject opening 212 of the case, and may fall out therethrough. Since the cradle and the eccentrics move in unison, no displacement of the bar key occurs.

The corresponding movement of the tumbler cylinder gear 233 brings the now leading tooth thereof into engagement with pinion 285 of the tumbler cylinder drive shaft 232. The tumbler cylinder being still engaged in locked position by reason of its tumblers extending into the body bores 256, the tumbler cylinder and the tumbler cylinder drive shaft 282 may not be turned, so that the engagement of gear 233 with pinion 285 marks the end of the return movement, beyond which the mechanism may not be forced. After return of the rejected coins, the mechanism may be reversed to initial starting position illustrated in Figures 37 and 43, proper coins inserted, and unlocking of the mechanism may then proceed.

it will thus be seen that there has been provided by this invention a structure in which the various objects hereinbefore set forth, together with many practical advantages, are successfully achieved. As various possible embodiments may be made of individual features of the invention, all without departing from the scope thereof,

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US271962 *Mar 28, 1882Feb 6, 1883 Joseph p
US2024497 *Jul 2, 1934Dec 17, 1935Alberti LuisLock
US2044672 *Mar 28, 1935Jun 16, 1936Morris DormanVending machine
USRE17451 *Jul 26, 1920Oct 8, 1929SCylinder lock
CH245320A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3990281 *Aug 16, 1974Nov 9, 1976Meder Richard TDouble cylinder pin tumbler lock
US4840264 *Jul 30, 1987Jun 20, 1989Ronis S.A.Deposit system installation for trolleys
US5188207 *Dec 20, 1991Feb 23, 1993Hoffman Arlan JVending machine coin mechanism
Classifications
U.S. Classification194/234, 70/493
International ClassificationG07F17/14, G07F17/00
Cooperative ClassificationG07F17/14
European ClassificationG07F17/14