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Publication numberUS2749658 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 12, 1956
Filing dateNov 2, 1951
Priority dateNov 2, 1951
Publication numberUS 2749658 A, US 2749658A, US-A-2749658, US2749658 A, US2749658A
InventorsNeumann Albert W
Original AssigneeNeumann Albert W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toy submarine
US 2749658 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 12, 1956 A. w. NEUMANN TOY SUBMARINE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Nov. 2, 1951 fix i252 J wziwa June 12, 1956 A. w. NEUMANN TOY SUBMARINE 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed NOV. 2, 1951 United States This invention relates to nautical toys and more particularly it relates to toys such as toy submarines and simulated swimming and diving toys in human form.

A principal object of the invention is to provide a simple and inexpensive toy boat or simulated swimming and diving toy which is adapted to be propelled in a simple manner to simulate the diving or submerging and raising actions of a submarine, or the actions of a swimmer in human form, or movements of a fish and the like.

Another object of the invention is to provide a toy of the above character which is adapted to be submerged in a container of water to a predetermined depth and which also may be propelled along the surface.

Another object of the invention is to provide a toy of this character with multiple compartments and jet orifices therefor, which is adapted to utilize the jet reaction of different fluid propellants within the compartments discharging through the orifices to produce different motions simulating actions.

Another object of the invention is to provide a submersible toy which has incorporated therein a simple construction adapted for producing or generating gas under pressure within the body of the toy.

Another object of the invention is to provide an aquatic toy with a simple device which may be readily inflated and deflated, the action thereof causing water to be drawn into the interior of the toy to submerge it to a predetermined depth.

In order to accomplish the above objects, one modification of my invention simulates a simple form of toy submarine having a hollow body in which is mounted an inflatable rubber balloon or sack through an opening in the rear thereof, and adapted to discharge through a mouth piece provided with an orifice of a predetermined size used in inflating the rubber balloon or sack. Upon placing the toy within the water so that the orifice is submerged below the surface, the action of the jet discharged from the orifice, as the rubber sack is deflated, causes the toy to be propelled forward. As the toy is being driven forward under the action of the fluid jet from the rear, another orifice intermediate the length of the hull, causes water to be drawn into the hull so that the toy submarine sinks to a predetermined depth. When this depth is reached, gas generating means within the hull, provided with gas generating material causes gas under pressure to be formed as the water within the hull comes in contact with the gas generating material. Due to the gas pressure produced, the water within the hull is discharged as a fluid jet through the second orifice, additionally propelling the toy forward with a combined upward movement as the water within the hull is emptied under the action of the fluid jet.

In another embodiment of the invention, in which the toy simulates the actions of a swimmer in human form, such as a frogman, the toy simulates a person whose hands are encased in gloves or mittens having enlarged palm and finger surfaces. The feet are also encased in ment shoes with enlarged sole surfaces simulating the equipment of naval swimmers, known as frogmen. The toy is also equipped with a simulated oxygen breathing apparatus which serves as a stopper for charging the gas generating equipment with gas generating material. The toy simulates a swimmer in a floating position and is propelled under a fluid jet from an inflated rubber balicon or sack which provides a combined forward and submerging movement because of an intermediate orifice within the body, and as the toy submerges, water is drawn within the body of the toy, causing it to sink until water comes within contact of the gas generating material, whereupon, the toy moves forward under the jet action of the water discharged from the second orifice within the body of the toy, and as the water is discharged, the toy resurfaces.

Many other objects and advantages of the construction herein shown and described will be obvious to those skilled in the art from the disclosure herein given.

To this end my invention consists in the novel con- 'structiou, arrangement and combination of parts herein shown and described and more particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

In the drawings wherein like reference characters indicate like or corresponding parts:

Fig. 1 is a view in elevation, partly in section and broken away, illustrating the apparatus providing the motive power in effecting the simulated movements of diving or submerging and/ or rising action of a simulated submarine;

Fig. 2 is a plan view of the submersible toy submarine of Fig. 1, illustrating a simulated gun acting as the stopper for the charging device of the gas generating apparatus, and the mouth piece for inflating the inflatable rubber balloon or sack for the driving mechanism;

Fig. 3 is a View in elevation of another embodiment of my invention, partly in section and broken away, to show the mechanism for simulating the various swimming movements of a simulated toy swimmer in human form, such as a frogman;

Fig. 4 is a plan view of the simulated toy swimmer, illustrating the simulated oxygen equipment, the gloves and shoes for the simulated swimmer; and

Fig. 5 is a cross-sectional view taken along lines 5-5 of Fig. 3, looking in the direction of the arrows, illustrating the inflatable rubber sack within the hollow body of the toy and the discharge orifice therefor.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 2, the simulated toy submarine preferably comprises a hollow body 10 formed by molding separate, similarly and oppositely formed halves of the body which may be joined along the center parting line 11. It is preferred to shape the toy submarine substantially along the proportions of the conventional submarine although it has been found that the action of the toy is improved to provide greater space for an inflatable rubber sack or balloon 12, which is inserted through an enlarged rear opening 13, formed by the molded halves of the toy. The rear end of the hull of the toy is shaped, as shown in Fig. 1, and adapted to receive the mouth piece 14 of the rubber balloon. A molded mouth piece 15 of plastic or rubber material is shaped as illustrated and provided with an orifice 16 of predetermined size. The orifice 16 may be provided with tapered counterbores 17 and 18 simulating with the orifice, a venturi nozzle. Another orifice 19 extends from the exterior of the mouth piece to the orifice 16 to inspirate water into the orifice 16 under the action of the air discharged as the rubber sack 12 is deflated to increase the action of the jet by the reaction of a fluid jet against the water over a conventional air jet against water. Although it is preferred to use this form of jet construction, it is also within the scope of the invention that a simple discharge, orifice 16, utilizing the air jet only, may be used without departing from the spirit of the invention.

The stopper or mouth piece 15, formed at the forward end with an annular groove 20, complementally formed to the opening 13 and the contiguous portion of the mouth piece 14 of the rubber sack 12, provides a tight seal to prevent leakage of water within the interior of the hull, except as desired through a second orifice 21 mounted in the bottom of the hull, intermediate the fore and aft portions of the hull. The orifice 21 may be formed from die cast metal or other molded material such as plastic or rubber, and inserted within an opening 22 formed within the halves of the hull, or assembled after the hull has been assembled, depending upon the construction of the orifice, whether it is molded to its final resultant shape, or constructed to be staked in place after the hull has been assembled. The orifice opening may be shaped as shown, or integrally molded within the halves of the hull of the submarine as will be described later in connection with the other embodiment of this invention. The size and shape of the orifice should be such that the reaction of the fluid jet discharged therefrom will tend to propel the toy forwardly, and at the same time have a slight reaction to give a forward lift to the toy in response to the action of the gas generating apparatus to be described later.

The bottom of the hull is illustrated as being formed with two symmetrically positioned keels 23 so that the toy may be set upright when not in use. It is also to be understood that if the orifice is integrally molded within the separate halves of the hull, the bottom of the hull may be constructed so that the toy may set upright on the flat bottom of the hull.

The super-structure of the submersible toy may be provided with an integrally or separately molded conning tower 24 having a periscope 25 and a hatch 26. If desirable, the mouth piece 15 may be provided with wings 27, shaped as illustrated in Fig. 2, simulating stablizing fins, and which may also serve to remove the stopper 15 for the replacement of a new rubber sack or balloon, as it is destroyed.

The gas generating mechanism 27 is adapted to simulate a submarine gun 28 which may or may not be pivoted, as desired, in a vertical plane about the axis 29, and also serves as the handle to remove the gas generating mechanism 27. The gas generating mechanism is formed with a stopper 30, preferably formed of molded plastic or rubber to the shape shown to provide a conically shaped stopper which fits in a complementally formed rubber gasket 31, formed as shown, to fit within a hole 32 formed in the joined halves of the hull. The gasket 31 may either be inserted as the halves of the hull are assembled or after the assembly of the hull, and it provides a tight seal to prevent leakage of gas generated within the hull by the gas generating mechanism. The stopper 30 is aflixed to the uprights 33 forming the support for the gun or handle for removing the stopper. The stopper also provides an adjustable support for movement of the gun in a horizontal plane. The complementally formed shape of the stopper and its gasket also provides additional sealing of the interior of the hull against leakage of gas generated therein.

Gas generating material 34, for generating the gas under pressure within the hull, may be preferably shaped as pellets, although it may be inserted loosely in bulk within a container 35 suspended by supports 36 from the bottom of the stopper 30. The container and its adjacent members of the gas generating mechanism may be either separately or integrally formed with the stopper 30, as desired. It is preferable to form the container 35 from plastic or suitable material not affected by the action of the water on the gas generating material to cause corrosion. The container may be constructed to the shape as shown and provided with a series of perforations 37 to permit the water within the hull to come in contact with the gas generating material. Other forms of container for the gas generating material will suggest themselves to those skilled in the art, the particular structure illustrated being solely for the purpose of illustration.

The assembled submersible toy should normally float on a level keel with the water line thereof substantially a slight distance above the opening within the mouth piece 15 so that the submarine is submerged so that it will run on the surface with the gun and the conning tower in surfaced'position. If necessary, the hull may be balanced by integrally molding weights or additional plastic within the halves forming the hull so that, normally, the hull floats in a level position.

Any gas used in an aquatic toy must preferably be odorless, non-toxic, non-explosive, and cheaply and readily formed. Carbon dioxide appears to be the only gas which fills the requirements. Such a gas may also be cheaply produced by the chemical reaction of tartaric acid and sodium bicarbonate. A sufiicient quantity of Bromo Seltzer or other effervescent powder which forms a harmless gas on contact with water is also satisfactory. Tartaric acid and sodium bicarbonate may be provided as a mixture of the particular materials in approximately equal parts or provided as separate pellets and alternately arranged within the gas generating apparatus 27 in any suitable perforated container. If desired, a simple additional ingredient may be provided to give a bitter taste to prevent the tablets being improperly used or ingested. It is also preferred that, if tablets are used, these be hard pressed so that they may not deteriorate too rapidly when in contact with air when not in use and also so as not to break down too rapidly when they are in contact with the water within the hull.

In order to operate the aquatic submersible toy to simulate the movements of a submarine, the gas generating material is placed within the container 35, after which it is mounted within the hull and the stopper 30 closed tightly. If the gas generating material does not contain acid-forming material, vinegar or other non-toxic acid may be poured within the bottom of the hull before the gas generating material has been positioned in place. The deflated balloon is inflated from the solid position 12, Fig. 1, by the operator of the toy blowing through the orifice 16 of the mouth piece 15, inflating the rubber sack or balloon 12 substantially to the dotted position 12'. With a finger over the opening 18, the toy is placed in a container of water of suificient depth and length within which the action of the toy will satisfactorily take place. The water level of the toy is above the orifice 16 so that as the opening 18 is uncovered, an air jet is discharged by the deflation of the balloon 12, driving the toy forward, and the water inspirated through the orifice 19 provides an improved jet action. As the submersible toy moves forward under the jet action, the deflation of the balloon 12 within the hull causes water to be drawn in through the orifice 21 into the interior of the hull causing the toy to sink at a rate depending upon the size of the orifice. As the depth of the water within the hull increases, the water within the hull which may or may not have a weak acid solution therein, depending upon the type of gas generating material used, comes in contact with the gas generating material, generating gas within the interior of the hull. As the pressure of the gas increases, the submersible toy which has now sunk to a predetermined depth, moves forward again under the action of the jet discharged through the orifice 21. The jet orifice is preferably shaped and located to simultaneously cause the forward end of the hull to raise as the water is discharged from within the hull so that the toy now simulates the raising action of a submarine finally coming awash at substantially its original level. Although the toy, for the purpose of simplifying the drawing, has not been illustrated with a rudder, it is within the scope of the invention that a conventional rudder may be provided which may be turned to provide motion of the submersible toy, either to the port or starboard, or it may be arranged to cause the toy to move substantially in a circle returning to its original position. If desired, the orifice 21 may be adapted to be swiveled to also assist the movement of the submersible toy in a predetermined direction.

Although it is preferred to operate the submarine toy as described above, it is also to be understood that the toy may be operated to produce additional movements depending upon the skill of the operator. For example, with the second orifice closed with a suitable stopper (not shown), the submersible toy may be propelled solely under the action of the inflated sack. Likewise, with the orifice 16 suitably closed with a stopper (not shown), the toy may be operated under the action of the gas generating material, the toy first sinking slowly to a predetermined depth, after which it is propelled with a forward and upward motion. Likewise, it is within the scope of the invention that the hull may be filled with water to a predetermined depth without any gas generating material in place; and with the orifice 21 closed, it may be operated at a predetermined depth under the action of the jet discharged from the inflated balloon 12. Likewise, it is also possible because of the enlarged opening that the balloon 12 may be provided with gas generating material and water entering through the orifice 16, causing gas to be generated, actuating the toy under the gas pressure through the jet 16 rather than in the preferred procedure by the normal inflation by the breath of the operator. Also, the sack 12 may be partially inflated with water to change the position of the water line with the aft position inclined downwardly at an angle and the submersible toy operated in this manner. Many other combinations of movements may be obtained within the skill of the operator.

It is obvious that a simple form of submersible toy has been provided having multiple chambers to simulate various movements in the operation of a submersible toy, and a toy constructed in this manner is easily cleaned by removing the gas generating mechanism for washing and drying and also the inflatable balloon, and flushing the interior out for re-use when desired. Also, a simple form of inflatable rubber balloon or sack has been provided so that readily available toy balloons may be used for repair and replacement.

Referring to Figs. 3 through 5, there is illustrated another embodiment of my invention employing the driving mechanism and gas generating means as described above with regard to the submersible boat of Figs. 1 and 2, but which have been incorporated into another form of submersible toy in the form of a simulated swimmer in human form, such as a naval frogman. The simulated toy swimmer 40 is also formed of symmetrically molded halves joined together on a parting line 41 along which the molded halves are cemented together, or it may be suitably molded along other parting lines as found desirable in molding a figure for example, which has the simulated features of a person. It is also to be understood that the parts, for example, the head and other parts may be molded separately and suitably cemented in correct relation to the other parts of the body. It is preferred to mold the simulated figure as light in weight as possible from molded plastic material, or rubber in a hollow ,forrn, enabling it to float substantially on the surface of the container in which the toy is floated with the mouth piece 15', and particularly the orifice 16 thereof, submerged. The mouth piece 15' is similarly constructed as that described with reference to Figs. 1 and 2, but somewhat modified in view of the nature of the toy. It is formed with the tapered counter-bores 17 and 18' to form a simulated venturi tube to obtain a greater jet action. Although the modified mouth piece 15' has not been .formed with the additional orifice 19, as described with reference to Figs. 1 and 2, it is to be understood that it may be incorporated without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

The hollow body 40 is preferably formed with the arms 42 outstretched in the position shown, and with the hands having gloves simulating the enlarged paddles 43 used by the frogmen. The arms are preferably formed hollow although they may be suitably chambered, as illustrated at 4-4, so that the toy will float in a substantially horizontal position. The arms may, if necessary, be formed separately and affixed to the body of the toy in any suitable manner. The legs 45 are preferably formed and displaced laterally, as shown in Fig. 4, in order to form with the symmetrical halves of the figure, a hollow intermediate chamber 46 integrally molded with the legs to receive an inflatable rubber balloon or sack 47, similar to the sack 12, which may be inflated substantially to the position shown, filling the interior of the body as formed by the thighs, legs and chamber 46 of the simulated toy figure. The chamber 46 is provided with an opening 48 over which the end or mouth piece of the balloon may be detachably mounted, being secured in place by an annular groove 2%), complementally formed to the free end of the balloon and the opening 48. The balloon 47 may be readily replaced when destroyed by the insertion of the balloon through the opening 48 and securing it in place with the stopper or the mouth piece 15'. Although the mouth piece has been shown as a simple mouth piece, it is to be understood that, if desired, wings similar to the wings or fins 27 of the toy submarine may be used to assist in the attachment and detachment of the mouth piece, taking up the free space between the feet 49 of the toy swimmer.

The feet 49 of the swimmer simulate the enlarged paddle-shaped soles of shoes worn by the frogmen and they are preferably formed, as are the simulated paddleshaped gloves worn on the hands, from the thermoplastic moldable material which may be manipulated under heat and pressure to assume positions other than as illustrated, if desired. The hands and feet may be manipulated without destruction of the toy to other positions to change the water line of the figure and also to assist in the movements simulated by the swimmer. In the position shown in Figs. 3 and 4, the feet 49 and stopper 15' of the toy are so positioned that it may stand erect when not in use.

It is also preferred to have the body of the toy swimmer of a simulated flesh color, and the gloves and shoes worn simulating any other suitable color worn by the frogmen. The trunks 56 may also be molded to simulate swimming trunks in any suitable color, or colored as desired. It is also within the scope of the invention that the entire toy shall be colored any suitable color simulating a diving suit of rubber, such as is also worn by frogmen.

A second orifice 50 formed as illustrated in Fig. 3 is located in the abdomen of the simulated swimmer and preferably constructed, as shown, with a counter-bore 51 to simulate a venturi tube. It is also to be understood that an orifice, similar to the orifice 21 described with reference to the toy submarine, may be used, and likewise that an integrally molded orifice 50 may be used in the toy submarine without departing from the scope of the invention. 2

Gas generating mechanism 51' is preferably formed as shown and provided with a container 52 which may be perforated, as illustrated at 53, and which is insertable through a gasket 31 adapted to be inserted in an opening 32, similarly, as described with reference to the submersible toy of Figs. 1 and 2. A stopper 30' complementally formed to the annular gasket 31' serves to seal the opening in the gasket to prevent the escape of the gas generated under pressure within the body of the toy swimmer. The container 52 is molded integrally with the stopper 30', or otherwise suitably aflixed; the con tainer being formed of suitable material which will not corrode under the chemical action of the gas generating material 34' placed in the container. The handle for the stopper is formed to simulate an oxygen container 54, and the oxygen container strapped on the back of the swimmer by a simulated harness 54' is connected through simulated hose to a transparent breathing mask 56 formed to be either detachable or cemented in place over the features of the toy swimmer. A head strap 57, either separately molded or integrally molded with the head of the toy, simulates a strap for attaching the mask 56 to the face. The hose is shaped as in Figs. 4 and 5, and may be either hollow tubing or solid extruded plastic material simulating a hose and serves to retain the stopper 30 when detached, so that it will not be lost.

In the operation of the toy swimmer, the container 52 when removed is filled with a suitable gas generating material 34', as described above, which may be either in bulk form or pellet-shaped material, and inserted within the body, sealing the opening after a non-toxic acid material such as vinegar or lemon juice or the like, have been added to the interior of the body to increase the formation of gas generation when the water mixes with the acid and in turn intermixes with the gas generating material. In the normal operation of the toy swimmer, the toy floats substantially on the surface of the water within the container in which the toy is floated with the eyes slightly showing above water and with the orifice 16 and the opening 18' entirely submersed. The balloon 47, after the gas generating material is in place, is then inflated through the mouth piece 15, substantially filling the interior of the body, as shown at 47 in Figs. 3 and 4. With the opening 18 covered, the toy is inserted in the water and the swimmer is propelled forwardly by the jet action of the stream of air discharging from the orifice 16. As it is propelled forwardly, water is drawn into the orifice 50 causing the swimmer to simulate a diving movement to swim under water; and, as soon as the water entering the orifice and acid material reaches the gas generating material, gas is generated under pressure causing the water to issue from the orifice as indicated by the arrows 58, and the toy again moves forward and upwardly as the water is ejected. If sufficient gas under pressure is generated, the gas formed may also discharge from the orifice, additionally propelling the toy if sufficient pressure is generated so that all of the water has been substantially removed from the interior of the toy. Usually, however, the interior capacity of the toy is such that as the water is ejected and as the balloon 47 deflates, the pressure of the gas is reduced so that very little additional jet action is provided by the gas under pressure unless the orifice is relatively small. It is to be understood that other swimming movements, such as floating and swimming on the back, may be simulated by the toy swimmer depending upon the ingenuity of the user of the toy. Furthermore, as the toy is divided into two volumes of variable capacity, many dilferent swimming actions may be simulated depending upon whether the orifices are free, or whether the rear orifice or front orifice is kept covered or uncovered as the toy swimmer is manipulated.

It is obvious that there has been described in both embodiments of my invention, a simple form of aquatic toy which is simple and cheap to fabricate and which may be easily manipulated by a young child.

Although it is preferred to have the toy assume the shape illustrated in Figs. 3 through 5, it is to be understood that other positions of the arms and legs may be simulated without departing from the scope of the invention.

It is also evident that several simple embodiments of the invention have been described with reference to aquatic toys in the shape of a simulated toy submarine and a simulated toy swimmer, but it is to be understood that it is also within the scope of the invention that the invention may be applied in other devices, simulating toy divers, fish, animals and the like forms of toys, simulating movement on the surface of water or under the surface of the water and combinations of movements simulating diving and raising actions as the toy is propelled forwardly, downwardly and/or upwardly.

it is also obvious that a simple form of aquatic toy has been devised which not only simulates various combinations of forward, raising and/0r diving actions, but also diving and raising actions in a substantially vertical plane, and also movements in which the toy may be movon the surface fully submerged or in intermediate positions thereof.

It is also evident that there has been disclosed several embodiments of a simple form of a multiple jet propelled and compartmented toy which may be molded from thermoplastic or other forms of plastic material, rubber and the like which are relatively unbreakable and which may be simply and cheaply manufactured.

It is also evident that there has been disclosed simple forms of aquatic toys which may use inexpensive forms of gas generating materials which are even readily available in non-toxic form in the ordinary home.

Having thus described my invention, it is obvious that various immaterial modifications may be made in the same without departing from the spirit of my invention; hence, I do not wish to be understood as limiting myself to the exact form, construction, arrangement and combination of parts herein shown and described, or uses mentioned.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. An aquatic toy comprising a hollow buoyant body, an inflatable rubber sack operatively mounted within the hollow buoyant body, an escape orifice operatively connected to said rubber sack and provided at the rear of the toy and adapted to be submerged in a body of water, whereby after inflation of the rubber sack through the orifice and the placement of the toy in the body of water, and deflation of the sack causing discharge of the air from the sack through said escape orifice, the toy is propelled forwardly, and another orifice located in the body of the toy below the water line and intermediate the ends thereof adapted for the entrance of water permitting water to flow into the hollow body in a predetermined amount, whereby the toy will have a combined forward and submerging movement as the air is discharged through the rear orifice.

2. An aquatic toy comprising a hollow buoyant body, an inflatable rubber sack operatively mounted within the hollow buoyant body, an escape orifice operatively connected to said rubber sack and provided at the rear of the toy and adapted to be submerged in a body of water, whereby after inflation of the rubber sack through the orifice and the placement of the toy in the body of water, and deflation of the sack causing discharge of the air from the sack through said escape orifice, the toy is propelled forwardly, another orifice located in the body of the toy below the water line and intermediate the ends thereof adapted for the entrance of water permitting water to flow into the hollow body in a predetermined amount, whereby the toy will have a combined forward and submerging movement as the air is discharged through the rear orifice, and means for generating gas under pressure within the hollow body after the water entering through the second-mentioned orifice reaches a predetermined level, whereby the gas generated causes the water within the hollow body to be discharged through said second-mentioned orifice so that the toy is additionally propelled forwardly and upwardly.

3. An aquatic toy comprising a hollow body adapted to receive a predetermined quantity of water, an inflatable rubber sack operatively mounted within the hollow body and adapted to displace the water, an escape orifice operatively connected to said rubber sack and located at the rear of the toy and adapted to be normally submerged in a body of water, whereby after inflation of the rubber sack through the orifice and the placement of the toy within the body of water, discharge of air through said escape orifice causes the toy to be propelled forwardly, and a second orifice located at the bottom of the toy intermediate the ends thereof allows water to be drawn within the hollow body at a predetermined rate as the air pressure within the hollow body is reduced upon deflation of the inflatable rubber sack.

4. An aquatic toy comprising a hollow body adapted to receive a predetermined quantity of water, an inflatable rubber sack operatively mounted within the hollow body and adapted to displace the Water, an escape orifice operatively connected to said rubber sack and located at the rear of the toy and adapted to be normally submerged in a body of water, whereby after inflation of the rubber sack through the orifice and the placement of the toy within the body of water, discharge of air through said escape orifice causes the toy to be propelled forwardly, a second orifice located at the bottom of the toy intermediate the ends thereof allows water to be drawn within the hollow body at a predetermined rate as the air pressure within the hollow body is reduced upon deflation of the inflatable rubber sack, and gas generating material located within the hollow body and adapted to generate a gas under pressure within the hollow body after the water entering through the second orifice reaches a predetermined level within the body to contact the gas generating material causing gas to be formed under pressure, whereby the gas generated causes the water within the hollow body to be discharged through said second orifice so that the toy regains substantially its original buoyancy.

5. A diving toy comprising a hollow buoyant body, an inflatable rubber sack operatively mounted within the hollow buoyant body, a rear escape orifice provided at the rear of the body and operatively connected to the rubber sack and adapted to be submerged within a body of water, a second orifice located in the body of. the toy intermediate the ends thereof adapted for the reception of water within the hollow body, and said rubber sack adapted to be inflated to a predetermined volume within the range of the volumetric capacity of the rubber sack, whereby after the inflation of the rubber sack through the first orifice to a predetermined volume and the placement of the toy in the body of water and deflation of the sack causing discharge of air from the sack, a volume of water will enter the hollow body through the second orifice substantially equal to the volume of air discharged through the first orifice, whereby the diving toy will submerge to a predetermined depth dependent upon its new buoyancy determined by the volume of water entering the hollow body.

6. A diving toy comprising a hollow buoyant body, an inflatable rubber sack operatively mounted within the hollow buoyant body, a rear escape orifice provided at the rear of the body and operatively connected to the rubber sack and adapted to be submerged within a body of water, a second orifice located in the body of the toy intermediate the ends thereof adapted for the reception of water within the hollow body, said rubber sack adapted to be inflated to a predetermined volume within the range of the volumetric capacity of the rubber sack, whereby after the inflation or" the rubber sack through the first orifice to a predetermined volume and the placement of the toy in the body of water and deflation of the sack causing discharge of air from the sack, a volume of water will enter the hollow body through the second orifice substantially equal to the volume of air discharged through the first orifice, whereby the diving toy will submerge to a predetermined depth dependent upon its new buoyancy determined by the volume of water entering the hollow body, and said diving toy being propelled forwardly under the discharge of air from the rear escape orifice as the toy submerges to a depth determined by the volume of air discharged from the rear escape orifice.

7. A diving toy comprising a hollow buoyant body, an inflatable rubber sack operatively mounted within the hollow buoyant body, an orifice located within the body of the toy substantially at the bottom thereof, a detachable closure for an opening in the hollow body, said closure permitting the mounting of the rubber sack within the hollow body, said hollow body adapted to be filled with water to change the buoyancy thereof to cause the toy to submerge to a different depth when inserted within a body of water, and a rear escape orifice formed in the closure and operatively connected to the rubber sack for the inflation thereof, whereby after the inflation of the rubber sack to a predetermined volume and the placement of the toy in the body of water, the deflation of the sack causes the toy to be propelled forwardly and an additional amount of water to be drawn into the body through the first orifice dependent upon the volume of air dis-- charged through the rear escape orifice causing the toy to submerge to a greater depth.

8. An aquatic toy comprising a hollow buoyant body, an inflatable rubber sack operatively mounted within the hollow buoyant body, said inflatable rubber sack adapted to divide the hollow body into two chambers, the volumes thereof varying as the rubber sack is caused to be inflated, a rear escape orifice operatively connected to the inflatable rubber sack and normally submerged in a body of water, and a second orifice located at the bottom of the body and adapted for the reception of water within the hollow body, whereby upon inflation of the rubber sack and the placement of the toy within the body of Water, the movement of the toyis controlled by the discharge of air from the rear escape orifice upon deflation of the rubber sack and the intake of water through the second orifice upon deflation. of the rubber sack.

9. An aquatic toy comprising a hollow buoyant body, an inflatable rubber sack operatively mounted within the hollow buoyant body, said inflatable rubber sack adapted to divide the hollow body into two chambers, the volumes thereof varying. as the rubber sack is caused to be inflated, a rear escape orifice operatively connected to the inflatable rubber sack and normally submerged in a body of water, a second orifice located at the bottom of the body and adapted to discharge toward the rear of the body, and gas generating means comprising gas generating material located at a predetermined location within the hollow body, whereby upon inflation of the rubber sack and the placement of the toy within the body of water, the forward movement of the toy and the submerging and rising actions thereof is controlled by the discharge of air from the rear escape orifice upon deflation of the rubber sack and the intake of water through the second orifice upon deflation of the rubber sack causing gas to be generated by contact of the water with gas-forming material and the discharge of the water from Within the body under the action of the generated gas.

10. An aquatic toy as set forth in claim 9, in which themovement of the toy is forward and submerging underthe action of air discharged from the rear escape orificeand deflation of the rubber sack, and forward and rising, under the action of the water discharged rearwardly from the second orifice upon the generation of gas from the. contact of the water with the gas-forming material.

11. The combination in an aquatic toy including a hollow buoyant body formed with an opening in the rear of the body, and an inflatable rubber sack operatively mounted within the body and adapted to be operatively connected within the opening in the rear of the body, of a detachable closure for said opening, said closure complementally formed to the opening and provided with an axial extending orifice with respect to the longitudinal axis of the toy, and a vertically extending passage connecting the orifice to the exterior of the closure, whereby water is aspirated through the axial extending orifice as the rubber sack is deflated increasing the jet action.

12. The combination in an aquatic toy including a hollow buoyant body and an inflatable rubber sack, adapted to discharge through a rearwardly arranged orifice with jet action, of another rearwardly arranged orifice intermediate the length of the hollow body, and operatively connected thereto, of means for generating a fluid under pressure within the hollow body, and said secondmentioned orifice upon the deflation of said rubber sack through said first-mentioned orifice, adapted to draw in water within the body due to the reduced pressure within the body caused by the deflation of the sack to be later discharged with a jet action to propel the toy.

13. The combinaion in an aquatic toy simulating a submarine including a hollow buoyant hull and an inflatable compartment mounted therein of variable volume and adapted to be inflated and deflated through a mouth piece having a discharge orifice, of another orifice operatively connected to the hull externally of said compartment and adapted for additionally propelling the toy, gas generating means within said hull, said second-mentioned orifice in operative relationship with respect to said gas generating means and adapted to discharge gas generated by the gas generating means, and the openings of said oriflces adapted to be controlled in a predetermined manner, whereby the diving, rising and forward movements may be simulated individually or combined as the conditions within the hull are varied and controlled by manipulation of the inflatable compartment and gas generating means and the orifices.

14. An aquatic toy including a hollow body formed with a plurality of compartments, one of said compartments formed by an inflatable rubber sack and adapted to be inflated, jet orifices operatively connected to each of said compartments and adapted to discharge fluid therefrom for propelling the toy, and one of said orifices adapted to draw fluid within the compartment to which it is operatively connected as the inflatable rubber sack is deflated by the discharge of fluid therefrom.

15. A toy vessel including a hull formed with a plurality of compartments, one of said compartments formed by an inflatable rubber sack and adapted to be inflated, jet orifices operatively connected to each of said compartments and adapted to discharge a propellant fluid therefrom for propelling the toy, one of said orifices adapted to draw fluid within the compartment to which the orifice is operatively connected as the inflatable rubber sack is deflated by the discharge of fluid therefrom, and gas generating means operatively mounted within the hull and adapted to be actuated as fluid enters to a predetermined level upon deflation of the inflatable rubber sack, whereby the vessel is adapted to simulate various combinations of forward, diving, submerging and raising actions as the vessel is propelled under the action of fluid discharged from the jet orifices in a predetermined manner.

16. A swimming toy including a hollow body formed with a plurality of compartments, one of said compartments formed by an inflatable rubber sack and adapted to be inflated, jet orifices operatively connected to each of said compartments and adapted to discharge a propellant fluid therefrom for propelling the toy, one of said orifices adapted to draw a propellant fluid within the compartment to which the orifice is connected from a body of fluid in which the toy is immersed upon deflation of the inflatable rubber sack, and gas generating means operatively mounted within the hollow body and adapted to be actuated as fluid enters to a predetermined level, whereby the swimming toy simulates various combinations of swimming motions under the action of fluid discharge from one or more of the jet orifices in a predetermined manner.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS l,O54,579 Mahon Feb. 25, 1913 1,243,287 Haigh Oct. 16, 1917 1,244,948 Brown Oct. 30, 1917 1,695,076 Zohe Dec. 11, 1928 1,783,095 Muirhead et al Nov. 25, 1930 2,120,151 Miller June 7, 1938 2,314,057 Slotsky et al Mar. 16, 1943

Patent Citations
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US1243287 *Nov 29, 1916Oct 16, 1917Harry J HaighToy.
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2777248 *May 21, 1956Jan 15, 1957Kellog CoMiniature toy boat
US4179841 *Nov 14, 1977Dec 25, 1979Rb Toy Development Co.Toy object that propels forward, submerges and surfaces
US6332819Sep 29, 2000Dec 25, 2001Jerrold K. EmmonsObject retrieval device used in water
US6926577 *May 24, 2003Aug 9, 2005Thorne, Iii EdwinUnderwater device and method of play
US8011993Feb 5, 2009Sep 6, 2011William Vernon ThompsonDiving toy
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/156, 446/161
International ClassificationA63H23/04, A63H23/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63H23/04
European ClassificationA63H23/04