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Publication numberUS2749838 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 12, 1956
Filing dateFeb 27, 1953
Priority dateFeb 27, 1953
Publication numberUS 2749838 A, US 2749838A, US-A-2749838, US2749838 A, US2749838A
InventorsStover Harry E
Original AssigneeAnchor Hocking Glass Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Marking device for containers, closures and the like
US 2749838 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 12, 1956 H. E. STOVER 2,749,838

MARKING DEVICE FOR CONTAINERS, CLOSURES AND THE LIKE IN V EN TOR.

Harry E .Sfmfer TTURNEY June 12, 1956 H. E. STOVER MARKING DEVICE FOR CONTAINERS, CLOSURES AND THE LIKE Filed Feb. 27, 1953 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.

HTTNEY June l2, 1956 H. E. STOVER 2,749,838

MARKING DEVICE FOR CONTAINERS, CLOSURES AND THE LIKE Filed Feb. 27, 1953 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 70 65 5% 75 77 JNVENTOR.

1 m 17d??? Saye'f l BY 37 1 $5 1 Z l f7 T 70E/VE Y MARKING DEVICE FOR CONTAINERS, cLosUREs AND THE LIKE Filed Feb. 27, 1955 H E. STOVER `lune 12, 1956 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 ffy 2 ,0164 7 A ww OIM j 1/ o w d .f w M. M Y l 9. ya :I .uw l 1H E f 1 J/M 4H we Ulm 141.. W l 5 7.. 1 HFM n fw@ ,EL y 4. 2 1/ M .n 4

United States Patent O" MARKING DEVICE FOR CONTAINERS, CLOSURES AND THE LIKE Harry E. Stover, Lancaster, Qhio, assigner to Anchor Hocking Glass Corporation, Lancaster, Ohio, a corporation of Delaware Application February 27, 1953, Serial No. 339,225

4 Claims. (Cl. 101-35) The present invention relates to a device or means for applying markings such as code numbers, words or legends to articles and more particularly to a device for applying such markings to the closure caps of freshly sealed containers.

In the food packaging industry, for example, it is important to record on the food containers by code or otherwise information relating to the source, type and grade of goods being packed as Well as the date of the pack. Such marking is best done concurrently with the packaging to assure its accuracy and timeliness as Well as to minimize handling of the containers. The containers are preferably marked immediately after they have been filled and sealed.

The present invention provides a new and improved device for applying the markings. The device may be used in cooperation with the conveyor belt of a closure machine such as shown in the Harry E. Stover Patent No. 2,618,425 or the F. Z. Fouse Patent No. 2,510,568 to insure the concurrent sealing and marking of the containers or it may be provided with its own conveyor system. The device has a readily adjustable marking head to accommodate containers of different heights, a new and improved inking means for the marking stamps, a simple and readily adjustable drive means and an improved container spacing system cooperating with the code applying head.

An object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved code or legend applying device.

` Another object of the invention is to provide a code applying device which is readily adjustable for different size containers.

Another object of the invention is to provide a code applying device which is simply and positively syn chronized.

Another object of the invention is to provide a code applying device with a new and novel ink supplying means.

Another object of the invention is to provide a code applying device with a relatively simple mechanical drive system.

Another object of the invention is to provide a code applying device which is relatively simple in construction and operation.

Another object of the invention is to provide a simple and easily adjusted container spacing attachment.

Another object is to provide a readily interchangeable ink supply for diiierent color or composition inks.

Other and further objects of the invention will be obvious upon an understanding of the illustrative embodiment about to be described, or will be indicated in the appended claims, and various advantages not referred to herein will occur to one skilled in the art upon employment of the invention in practice.

A preferred embodiment of the invention has been chosen for purposes of illustration and description and is shown in the accompanying drawings, forming a part of the specification, wherein:

Fig. 1 is a top plan view partly broken away;

2,749,838 Patented June 12, 1956 ICC Fig. 2 is a side elevation of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a sectional View taken along the line 3-3 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a sectional view taken along the line 4-4 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a sectional view taken along the line 5 5 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 6 is a sectional View taken along the line 6-6 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 7 is a sectional View taken along the line 7-7 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 8 is a top View partly in section of an alternate inking device;

Fig. 9 is a side elevational View of the device of Fig. 8;

Described generally (Figs. l and 2) the present device comprises a moving conveyor belt 1 which carries the containers 2 beneath the code applying head 4. Ink is supplied to code applying head 4 from transfer roller 5 which is in turn supplied by rubber inking roller 6. Rubber inking roller 6 rotates in ink supply 7 (Fig. 3) contained in ink reservoir S. Code applying head 4 is rotated by a drive system connected to the conveyor drive 9 and is so synchronized with the conveyor that containers carried under the code applying head 4 are imprinted with the desired legend.

The code applying device hereafter designated as the coder is preferably located immediately adjacent the exit end of a sealing machine (not shown) such as applicant's Patent No. 2,618,425 which applies closure caps such as 10 to the containers 2. However, the coder may be used with any type of sealing machine.

Conveyor and container spacing mechanism Referring again to the drawings and more particularly to Figs. l and 2 which show one form of the present coder, the conveyor belt 1 moves the sealed containers from right to left. The belt may be an extension of the same belt used with the sealing machine or it may be a separate endless belt. The conveyor belt 1 may be driven in any suitable manner such as by a power take off from the sealing machine drive. Guide rails 11 running parallel with and along the sides of the conveyor belt 1 keep the containers from sliding ofr the conveyor belt 1 as they are carried from the sealing device to the coder. The guide rails 11 are mounted on slotted brackets 15. The guide rail position may be adjusted laterally with respect to the conveyor belt 1 by loosening bolt 14 which allows bracket 1S to be adjusted within the contines of slots 12.

In order for the rotating code head 4 to contact the correct part of the sealed containers it is necessary that the containers be moved to a given position on the belt 1. This requires the containers to be boh horizontally and longitudinally spaced on the conveyor belt. This spacing is done by guides 11, spacing arm 16, and the transverse cleats 17 (Fig. 3) on the conveyor belt 1. Spacing arm 16 is pivoted from the bottom of spacing arm bracket 13 on pivot 23. Arm 20 on the upper side of bracket 13 is attached to pivot 23 also so that it pivots with arm 16. Arm 20 is pivotally attached at its outer end to rod 19. Rod 19 is loosely iitted in bearing 21. Spring 1S forces rod 19 to the left and thus the intermediation of arm 20 and pivot 23 holds arm 16 in a normal position against stop 22. Arm 16 is adjusted so that a container traveling on the conveyor 1 between the guide rails 11 on either side strikes the arm 16. Arm 16 is adjusted by sliding slotted bracket 13 toward or away from the belt. After the container strikes the arm 16 it is both forced over against the rail 11 oppositearm 16 and also retarded from moving with the belt. The container remains stationary as the belt slides beneath it until cleat 17 (Fig. 3) engages the bottom of the container and carries it past arm 16. When the cleat 17 c A l 2,749,838

contactsthe container it prevents further slippage between the container andthe conveyor and arm 16 is forced to swing out of the path of the container.

Each container is thus moved to a position next to the guide rail and against the conveyor cleats as it passes the spacing arm 16. Alternate methods of container spacing may be used such as the helicoid of the Henry E. Stover Patent No. 2,618,425.

Code head and inking device drive The container next passes bene-ath the code applying head 4 where it receives the appropriate imprint. The drive mechanism is shownin Figs. l, 2 and 5. The rotation of the code head 4 may be positively synchronized with the conveyor belt since the code head 4. is driven through a system of chains and gears from the conveyor drive which has a positive engagement with conveyor belt 1 Sprocket 24 is fastened to. driven shaft 25 to which conveyor drive wheel 9 is also fastened. Sprocket 24 is connected to sprocket 26 through drive chain 27. Sprocket 26 is mounted on one endV of shaft 28 (Pig. 5) and sprocket 29 is mounted on the other end. Sprocket 29 drives sprocket 30 on shaft 31 by drive chain 32. Idler 34 engages drive chain 32. The code head 4 is driven from shaft 31 through the intermediation of gear 67, gear 6.6v and shaft 66. Since the code head 4 is driven by a gear and drive chain system from the conveyor drive 9, the rotational position of the code head 4 may be set with respect to theposition ofthe conveyor belt. Also since the spacing arm 16 has placed the containers in a given position on the conveyor, the code head 4 is also fixed with respect to the containers.

Code head and inking device support The code head and inking device support is shown in detail in Figs. 5, 6 and 7. Mounting plate 35 is held in position by supports 36 and 37. Both supports 36 and 37 are mounted on. support plate 38. Support plate 38 is attached in any suitable manner on the side of the conveyor.

Fig. is a sectional View of the right hand support 36. Shaft 28 is held by collar 39 which is bolted by bolts 40 and 41 to plate 38. Support 36 is hinged on collar 39. The vertical slope of support 36 is determined by bolt 42. Bolt 42 passes through slot 44 in support 36. The support 36 rotates about collar 39 within the confines determined by slot 44 and bolt 42. The desired position may be set by tightening bolt 42against support 36. Shaft 31 is supported at the upper end of support 36 in collar 46. Collar 46 is bolted by bolts 47 and 4S to mounting plate 35. The inking device 43 for the code head 4 is attached to the end of collar 46. A suitable cover 45 may be mounted on support 36 and a cover 53 may be mounted on plate 35.

Fig. 6 is a sectional view of support 37. The lower end of support 37 has a bearing 49 which is mounted over pivoty member 50. The support 37 is held in place on pivot member 5t) by bolt 52 and washer 54. The upper end of support 37 has a sleeve 56 on pivot member 57. Bolt 59 and washer 58 hold the sleeve 56 in place against pivot member 57. Pivot member 57 is fastened to mounting plate 35 by bolts 60 and 61.

Fig. 7 is a sectional View of the code head mounting on the mounting. plate 35 intermediate the supports 36 and 37. Collar 62 is bolted to mounting plate 35 with bolts 64 and 65. Shaft 66 is held by collar 62 and has gear on one end and the code head 4l on the other end. Gear 68 is fastened to shaft 66 by'bolt 69 and washer 70;

Code head The code head 4 (Figs. 3 and 7) is mounted on the opposite end of shaft 66 and is held between collar 71 and cup Washer 72. Cup Washer 72 is forced against the code head 4 by nut 74. The position of collar 71 onthe shaft 66, istixed by set screw 75. Pin 73=holds the code head locked with the collar 71. Thus, in order to adjust the radial position of the code head- 4 on shaft 66, nut 74 and set screw 75 are loosened. Collar 71 and code head 4 are then rotated to the correct position and then nut 74 and set screw 75 are retightened. The rotational speed of the code head 4 with two stamps 76 and 77 is synchronized so that it makes one half of a revolution for each container that passes beneath it and the code head 4 is radially positioned so that the stamp 76 or 77 registers with the desired point on the container top.

Fig. 3 shows the mountings of stamps 76 and 77 on code head 4. Stamps 76 and 77 are preferably made of rubber, plastic, or other suitable material with the code number or imprint on them. They are attached to the code head 4 by bracket members 78, 79, 80 and 81 which are fastened to code head 4in any suitable manner such as by screws 82, S3, 84 and 85.

While the present code head 4 is shown with two stamps 76 and 77 it will be clear that any convenient number of stamps maybe used.

lnkng device Figs. 1 through 5 show one form of inking device 43. Reservoir 8 with cover 88 and handle 89 are mounted on plate 93 which in turn is mounted on collar 46.

As seen in Fig. 3 ink 7 is transferred from the reservoir 8 to rubber roller 6 to steel transfer roller 5 and to stamps 76 and 77 on code head 4. The steel transfer roller 5 and gear 94 are fastened to shaft 31 by bolt 92 (Fig. 5). As before noted, shaft 31u is driven by drive chain 32. Gear 94 engages gear 96 which rotates rubber roller 6 on eccentric shaft 95. Eccentric shaft 9S is mounted in bearing 97 (Fig. 4). Cap 9S is fitted over the end of eccentric shaft 95 and spring 99 is compressed lbetween the bearing 97 and the wheel 98 to hold eccentric shaft 95Y in position both axially and rotationally. Knob 100 provides a means to rotate the eccentric shaft so. that the inking roller pressure with the steel transfer roller can be adjusted. When knob 100 is pulled in an axial direction with relation to eccentric shaft 95 against the force of spring 99, the gear 96 and gear 94V disengage allowing the eccentric shaft 95- to be freely turned.

Inking device 43 may be readily lled and it may also be easily cleaned and adjusted by the removal of cover 88. The rate of transfer of ink by the rubber roller 6 to transfer roller 5 is simply adjusted by rotation of the eccentric shaft 95 by knob 100. Since both the rubber roller 6 and the transfer roller 5 are geared to the code head drive system their rate of rotation and thus the ratev of ink transfer to the inking stamps 76 and 77 is proportional to the stamping rate on the containers. This results in a uniform imprint of the code marking on the container tops. As the inking device is rigidly mounted with respect to the code head 4 through collar 46 andl plate 35, adjustments in the height of the code wheel 4 will not change the spacing between the transfer roller- 5 and the stamps 76 and 77 on code head- 4.

Figs. 8 and 9 show an alternate type of inking device 43. A hollowroller 101 supports an outer porous exible inking ring 102 of a material such `as sponge rubber. The roller 101 has radially directed holes 1-04 in its outer run andhas a circular plate 105 with a central aperture 106 fastened over its open end. The roller 101Y is fitted' over and rotates on the end of an eccentric shaft 107. The eccentric shaft- 107 is fitted through a hole 1-08 in a mounting plate 109. Flange 110 on the eccentric shaft 107 is pulled tightly against plate 109 by nut 111. The end 112 of shaft 107 is made square to facilitate its rotation during adjustment of the rollers position.

The roller 101 is held on the eccentric shaft 107 by plunger 114 which fits loosely into the circular groove 115 in shaft 107. The plunger is held in the groove by spring 116 acting against ilange 117 on the plunger 114. A hollow tube 118 runs from ink reservoir 119 through hole 106 to a point within the hollow roller 101. Ink ows from the reservoir to the tip 113 of tube 118 Where it drips into the hollow roller 101. It then flows through the holes 104 to the ring 102 to saturate it with ink. Reservoir 119 may be supported by a suitable bracket (not shown) attached to plate 109. Valve 120 controls the ink flow. Stamps 76 and 77 contact the ring 102 as they rotate and receive an ink coating for printing the containers. As the stamps contact the roller 101 they rotate it causing the ink which drips into the roller 101 to be uniformly distributed in ring 102.

Fig. 8 shows the inking device 43' mounted on plate 35 in place of inking device 43. Plate 109 is iitted over collar 62 and is held in place by bolts 121 which pass through collar 123 land attach to plate 35. Ink device 4.3 may be rotated if desired by connection with the code head drive system by gears 124 and 125 (Fig. 8). In Fig. 8 shaft 31 and collar 46 are cut 0E near plate 35. Plate 109 may be mounted in a position 180 from that shown on the other side of the code head 4 if desired.

Inking device 43 provides a simple effective ink supplying device. It is readily adjusted for the proper degree of pressure against the stamps by rotation of the eccentric mounting shaft. The ink supply is readily replenished by refilling the accessible reservoir. The rollers are also easily changed by simply pulling out the plunger 114 and removing the roller from the end of shaft 107. This allows for rapid changes of rollers for different colors of ink or different sizes or widths of rollers. The ink reservoir also is adapted for easy change being separate from the roller. The reservoir may be cleaned and adjusted without disturbing the roller. The valve control 120 of the ink line provides a simple adjustment for the rate of ink supply.

Adjustments and operation Height adjustments of the code head 4 are made by swinging the parallel support members 36 and 37 about collar 39 and pivot member 50 on plate 38. Since support members 36 and 37 are of equal length and are pivoted at equal distances from the horizontal conveyor belt 1, the mounting plate 35 will retain its horizontal alignment as it is raised or lowered by swinging supports 36 and 37. Thus the inking devices 43 or 43 will retain their relative horizontal position and will not be affected by height adjustments. Similarly the stamps 76 and 77 will also retain the same parallel alignment with relation to the conveyor belt at the lowermost position of their circular path. Adjustments will be made for changes in the stamp positions longitudinally with respect to the conveyor belt at the bottom of their swing by turning the code head 4 radially on shaft 66 as previously described. In order to swing the supports 36 and 37 it is only necessary to loosen bolt 42. Support 36 has slot 44 in it allowing it to be moved with relation to bolt 42 within the connes of slot 44. Support 37 is held on the pivot member 50 by washer 54 and bolt 52. This frictional engagement will allow support 37 to rotate when support 36 is moved. If necessary bolt 52 may be temporarily loosened during adjustment. Drive chain 32 will not prevent swinging of support member 36 since sprocket 29 and support member 36 are concentrically mounted and since the upper sprocket 30 will freely rotate.

Vertical adjustment of the height of the code head 4 is thus very simply accomplished by loosening two bolts. Extremely fine adjustments may be made since small changes in height will result from swinging the supporting members 36 and 37 through relatively large arcs. Both the code stamps 76 and 77 and the inking device 43 will retain the same relative horizontal alignment with respect to the conveyor belt.

In order to provide for synchronization between the containers 2 and the code head 4 so that a stamp such as 76 will imprint a mark on each container top, the rotational speed of the code head must be adjusted to cooperate With the container spacing on the conveyor belt l. On a two stamp machine as shown in the drawing this means that the code head 4 must make one complete revolution for every two containers that pass the code head 4. Where the containers are spaced by cleats as shown in Fig. 3 the code head will make one complete rotation for each two cleats that pass. This rotational speed is set by choosing the proper ratios between the number of teeth on sprockets 24, 26, 29 and 30 as well as the gear ratio between gears 67 and 68.

In order to code a particular run of containers the height of the code head 4 is adjusted so that the stamps 76 and 77 contact the container top 10 as the stamps reach the lowest point of their rotational path. The radial position of the code head 4 is next adjusted on shaft 66 as above described so that the stamps contacts the portion of the container top that it is desired to mark.

Guide rails 11 are adjusted horizontally to hold the containers in the proper position on the belt 1. Slotted bracket 13 slides horizontally to adjust the spacing of spacing arm 16 so that a desired amount of pressure will be exerted on the containers 2 as they pass between spacing arm 16 and guide rail 11.

The eccentric shafts in inking device 43 or the eccentric shaft 107 in inking device 43 are then turned to cause their associated rubber rollers to make proper contact with the steel transfer roller 91 or the code head 4 respectively.

The containers now may be fed through the coder by placing one container between each cleat on the conveyor belt. The containers will be automatically spaced and coded as they are carried along by the conveyor belt.

It will be seen that the present invention provides a new and improved device or mechanism for applying code markings to the top portions of containers. The device may be operated in close cooperation with the sealing machine to eliminate any mishandling or error between the sealing and the coding of the containers. The containers are accurately positioned with respect to the code applying head.

The parallel and adjustable support arms allow for very accurate and fine height adjustments of the code head height Without causing the relative horizontal alignment of the ink supplier on the code stamp to be changed. This adjustment is simply made by loosening a minimum number of bolts.

Simple, readily cleaned and adjustable ink suppliers are provided to automatically ink the code stamps.

An easily synchronized and simple drive system is provided to operate the coder. This allows the coder to be used with containers of different sizes and with sealing machines of different speeds.

The device is of relatively simple and strong construction and will be suitable for use in long uninterrupted service.

As various changes may be made in the form, construction and arrangement of the parts herein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention and without sacrificing any of its advantages, it is to be understood that all matter herein is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

Having thus described my invention in some detail, I claim:

l. In a device for applying markings to closure caps of sealed containers moving on a substantially horizontal path; the combination of a mark applying means above the path; a support means for said applying means comprising an upper mounting plate member carrying said applying means, a lower support plate member, a plura-lity of support arm members interconnecting said upper plate member and said lower support plate member, said support arm members being pivotally connected with said mounting plate member and said support plate member, the distances between said upper plate pivot connections and said lower pla-te pivot connections on said arm members being equal, said arm members being parallel; a drive mechanism forV said applying means comprising a first sprocket gear mounted concentrically with the lower pivot of one of said arm members, a second sprocket gear mounted concentrically with the upper pivot of the same arm member, and a chain coupling said sprocket gears whereby said arm members may be rotated about said pivot connections with saidA chain coupling in place.

2. In a device for applying markings to closure caps of sealed container moving on a substantially horizontal path; the,V combination of a mark applying means above the path; a support means for said applying means comprising an upper mounting plate member carrying said applying means, a lower support plate member, a plurality of support arm members interconnecting said upper plate member and said lower support plate member, said support arm members being pivotally connected with said mounting plate member and said support plate member, the distance between said upper plate pivot connections andfsaid lower plate pivot connections on said arm members being equal, said arm members being parallel; a drive mechanism for said applying means comprising a rst sprocket gear mounted on said lower support plate member, a second sprocket gear mounted on said upper mounting plate member at a distance from said rst sprocket gear equal to the distance between said upper plate pivot connection and said lower plate pivot connection, and a chain coupling said sprockets whereby said arm members may be rotated about said pivot connections with said chainl coupling in place between said sprockets.

3. A device for applying markings to closure caps on scaled containers comprising a substantially horizontal conveyor for a series of containers, a rotating mark applyingV means above said conveyor, ay support means for said applying means comprising an upper plate mounting said applying meanson a rotatable shaft, a lower support plate, a plurality of' arms pivotally connected-to said upper and lower plates, the distances between the upper pivot connection and the lowerl pivot connection on said arms being equal, said arms being parallel, a removable fastening between one of said arms and one of said plates whereby thel position4 of said arms relative to said pivot connections is iixed to.set the height of'said mark applying means abovesaid conveyor, a common driving source for said conveyorandsaid mark applying means, a first coupling means operatively connecting said source and said conveyon and aV secondl coupling means operatively connecting said source and said applying means comprising a ti'rstV sprocket gear mounted on said upper plate, a second sprocket gearmounted on said lower support plate so that itsxdi'stance from said rst sprocket is equal to the distance between the pivot connections on said arms and a chain operatively connecting said sprockets whereby. said arms may be turned on said pivots with said chainA connection between the sprockets in place.

4. The device as claimed in claim 3 in which said first and said second sprocket gears are mounted concentrically with the upper and lower pivot connections respectively of'one-of said arms.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,614,547 Elliott Jan. 18, 1927 1,689,177 Storck Oct. 23, 1928 1,721,922` Roe July 23, 1929 1,788,455 Ediniston et al Jan. 13, 1931 1,801,877 Pacher Apr. 21, 1931 2,109,590' Kimball' Mar. 1, 1938 2,329,493 Tilson Sept. 14, 1943 2,425,249 Lacy-Hulbert` Aug. 5, 1947 2,471,098 Davies May 24, 1949 2,674,939 Brengman Apr. 13, 1954

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1614547 *Aug 17, 1925Jan 18, 1927Elliott Harmon PInking device for printing machines
US1689177 *Jul 29, 1924Oct 23, 1928 Assigitob to standabd
US1721922 *May 2, 1928Jul 23, 1929John A McnearBox-printing machine
US1788455 *Dec 10, 1928Jan 13, 1931Edmiston Edward EInking roller
US1801877 *Jul 30, 1930Apr 21, 1931Internat Postal Supply CompanyInker
US2109590 *May 2, 1935Mar 1, 1938Standard Knapp CorpPrinting machine
US2329493 *Oct 2, 1940Sep 14, 1943North American Holding CorpMarking machine
US2425249 *Aug 2, 1943Aug 5, 1947Lacy-Hulbert DenisArticle-controlled marking means
US2471098 *Sep 1, 1945May 24, 1949White Cap CoRotary marking means for containers
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2993434 *Jan 16, 1959Jul 25, 1961Continental Can CoRotary marking device
US3035515 *Apr 25, 1958May 22, 1962Mckay James GPackage imprinting apparatus
US3111896 *Nov 16, 1960Nov 26, 1963Kamru Products CompanyBlanket roll means
US3116684 *Jul 6, 1961Jan 7, 1964Gottscho Inc AdolphMarking apparatus
US3228324 *Dec 8, 1961Jan 11, 1966Brogdex CoStamping machine for fruit and the like
US3648601 *Jun 2, 1969Mar 14, 1972Weidman Roger FCode-marking mechanism
US3738260 *Jul 2, 1971Jun 12, 1973Gottscho A IncArticle controlled bottom marking apparatus
US4552063 *Nov 19, 1984Nov 12, 1985Bronson James CLine coder self-inking system with disposable ink supply reservoir
US4785735 *Dec 21, 1983Nov 22, 1988Monarch Marking Systems, Inc.For an ink roll
Classifications
U.S. Classification101/35, 101/367, 101/37
International ClassificationB41F17/08, B41F17/16
Cooperative ClassificationB41F17/16
European ClassificationB41F17/16