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Publication numberUS2750050 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 12, 1956
Filing dateFeb 9, 1953
Priority dateFeb 9, 1953
Publication numberUS 2750050 A, US 2750050A, US-A-2750050, US2750050 A, US2750050A
InventorsEbert Ludwig
Original AssigneeEinson Freeman Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cardboard display unit for a mass merchandise display
US 2750050 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

L. EBERT June 12, 1956 CARDBOARD DISPLAY UNIT FOR A MASS MERCHANDISE DISPLAY 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Feb. 9. 1953 INVENTOR.

ZuDW/6 EBERT L. EBERT June 12, 1956 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 9. 1955 w m n Y T E 5 NE u m 6 M w m m w A r s 7 5 2 I v I 1 0 0 Y Z B Z 5 m 1 CARDBOARD DISPLAY UNIT FOR A MASS MERCHANDISE DISPLAY Ludwig Ebert, New York, N. Y., assignor to Einson-Freeman Co., Inc., Long Island City, N. Y., a corporation of Delaware Application February 9, 1953, Serial No. 335,676

Claims. (Cl. 211-49) This invention relates generally to cardboard display devices, and has particular reference to a display unit of the knock-down type intended for use with a multiplicity of merchandise items arranged in a mass merchandise display.

From an advertising and sales standpoint it is fre quently desirable to arrange a large number of identical merchandise items in closely adjacent stacks, the mass of items having a unique attention-arresting quality. Such a mass merchandise display is often placed in such a location, in a super-market or other retail establishment, that purchasers may have direct access to the goods and may remove them as desired. Under such circumstances it is necessary to provide an independent anchorage for any display poster or other advertising embellishment that may be associated with the merchandise, since the stacks themselves cannot be relied upon to support any such poster.

United States PatentO It is a general object of the present invention to provide a display unit of improved and specialized character for association with a cluster of massed merchandise items, in which an inexpensive yet efiicient means is provided for maintaining a display poster in proper position not- It withstanding the removal of merchandise.

The present improved unit consists, in brief, of a flat base of appreciable size adapted to underlie at least one of the stacks of merchandise, a backbone or standard anchored to the base and adapted to extend vertically upward between the stacks, and a display poster secured to the upper end of the backbone. In accordance with the invention, the backbone comprises radial ribs of flat character so arranged that a stack of merchandise items may be snugly accommodated in the angle between each pair of adjacent ribs. Preferably the ribs are four in number and are arranged at 90 intervals.

Among the features of the invention are the simplicity of the parts entering into the construction, and the consequent low cost of manufacture; the rigidity and staunchness which is nevertheless achieved; the ease with which the parts may be set up in readiness for use, or disassembled and collapsed for purposes of storage or shipment; the ability to use the backbone itself, in addition to the display poster which it carries, as a display part on which advertising or other embellishment may be carried; and the possibility of forming the parts in such a way that the desired results may be achieved with only a single printing on one face of flat cardboard stock.

The preferred way of achieving these general objectives and advantages, and such other objects and advantages as may hereinafter be pointed out, is illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which- Figure l is a perspective view of a display unit of the present character;

Figure 2 is a plan view, with the display poster omitted, and with parts broken away;

Figures 3, 4 and 5 are plan views of the three elements of which the backbone is composed;

Patented June 12, 1956 2 ments of Figures 3, 4 and 5 in assembled relation with a part broken away;

Figure 7 is a cross-sectional view substantially on the line 7-7 of Figure 6;

Figure 8 is a plan view of the blank of which the display poster is formed;

Figure 9 is a perspective view of the display poster, by itself;

Figure 10 is an enlarged cross-sectional view substantially on line 10--10 of Figure 9;

Figure 11 is an enlarged fragmentary cross-sectional view substantially on the line 11--11 of Figure 1;

Figure 12 is a plan view of the blank entering into the construction of a backbone of modified character;

Figure 13 is a plan view of the blank of which other elements of the modified backbone are formed;

Figure 14 is a plan view of the blank that may be used to form a display poster of modified kind; and

Figure 15 is a view similar to Figure 10, showing the modified display poster in cross-section.

The device chosen for illustration in Figure 1 is approximately two or three feet in height, and may be satisfactorily composed of cardboard stock having a thickness of approximately 0.08 inch. It is intended for use with four or more massed stacks of rectangular merchandise items, such as conventional boxes of cleaning tissue or the like. These details are mentioned merely by way of example, and it will be understood that the invention is not restricted to any exact sizes, nor to merchandise items of any particular character.

The unit consists essentially of a base 20, an upright backbone or standard 21, and a display poster 22. The base is of appreciable area adapted to underlie at least one of the stacks of merchandise items with which the unit is employed. In the illustrated device, the base has been shown as a substantially square element, and it may be approximately ten or twelve inches long.

A convenient way to afford support for the backbone 21 is to form the base 20 with a medial upstanding section 23 of two-ply thickness. This may be achieved by forming the base of a blank slightly longer than the ultimate dimension, and folding the mid-portion upwardly to define two adjacent vertical layers, as shown, which may be glued or stapled together. In the central portion of the section 23, a slot 24 is formed (see Figure 2) so that two ribs of the backbone may be inserted downwardly into the space between the two plies of the section 23. The base 20 is also provided with slits 25 on opposite sides of the section 23, adapted to receive anchoring tabs 26 formed on the lower ends of the other two ribs of the backbone. In Figure 2 one of the ribs of the backbone has been broken away to reveal one of the slits 25 in the base 20. A similar slit is arranged on the opposite side of the section 23, and it receives one of the tabs 26, as indicated in dotted lines, the tab being turned to lie in a horizontal plane directly beneath the base 20. y

In the backbone herein chosen for illustration, there are four radial ribs arranged at intervals. The ribs are formed of the three flat cardboard elements 27, 28 and 29, shown by themselves in Figures 3, 4 and 5. Each of these rib elements is of elongated character, and it will be observed that the element 27 is approximately twice as wide as each of the elements 28 and 29. Along its medial longitudinal axis, the element 27 is provided with a series of spaced longitudinal slots 30. At its lower end, the element 27 is provided with the tabs 26, each of which is adapted to be folded along the attachment line 31. Between the tabs 26 the element 27 may be provided with the short notch 32 which facilitates an interlocking engagement with the section 23 of the base, which may be provided with a corresponding notch at its center, the

to interlock. At its upper end the element 27 is provided with the upstanding substantially rectangular tongue 33 affording an anchorage for the display poster presently to be described.

The rib element 28 is provided along one longitudinal edge with attachment tabs 34 spaced to correspond to the spacing of the slots 30. The element 29 is similarly provided with tabs 35.

A first step in the manufacture of the unit is to assemble the rib elements 27, 28 and 29 as indicated in Figures 6 and 7. The element 28 is arranged transversely to the element 27, on one side of the latter, and the tabs 34 are inserted into the slots 30. The element 29 is similarly arranged on the opposite side of the element 27, and the tabs 35 are inserted through the slots 30 so that there are in each slot two overlapping tabs, as indicated in Figure 7. By means of staples or other fastening elements 36, each tab is secured to the adjacent part of the rib element on the remote side of the slot.

Where the elements 28 and 29 are arranged at right angles to the element 27, the resultant backbone or standard consists of four radial ribs, as shown. Each of the elements 28 and 29 has its upper region lying closely adjacent to the upstanding tongue 33.

As will be readily understood, the device of Figure 6 may be collapsed into a relatively flat condition during shipment and storage. When the unit is ready to be set up for use, the lower ends of the ribs defined by the narrower elements 28 and 29 are brought into alignment and inserted downwardly into the slot 24 in section 23 of the base 20. At the same time, the anchoring tabs 26 are folded along the lines 31 so as to lie in substantially horizontal planes, and each is threaded into the corresponding slit 25 in the base 20. Preferably one of the tabs 26 is turned in one direction, the other tab in the other. The snug fit between the two plies of the section 23 and the ribs with which it engages, the interlock between the element 27 and the section 23 as a result of the notch 32 and the corresponding notch in the section 23, and the interengagement between the anchoring tabs 26 and the slits 25 of the base afford an unusually staunch securement of the upstanding backbone with the base.

The display poster 22 shown in Figures 1, 8, 9 and is formed of a blank having a main display panel 37, a relatively small panel 38 hinged along its lower edge 39, and a third relatively small panel 40 hinged to the panel 38 along the line 41. The intermediate panel 38 is provided with a cut-out 42 having a length substantially equal to the length of the upstanding tongue 33 on the element 27. During the course of manufacture, the panels 37, 38 and 40 are folded into the superposed relation best shown in Figure 10, whereby the display poster has a reinforced and thickened margin produced along its lower edge. The three panels involved in forming this margin may be adhesively secured together, or stapled or otherwise held in the desired relation. The cutout 42 defines a pocket adapted to fit snugly over the upstanding tongue 33, as best shown in Figure 11. This snug fit, coupled with the fact that the upper regions of the elements 28 and 29 snugly engage the three-ply margin of the poster between them, secures the poster firmly.

In use, a stack of merchandise items is snugly fitted into the angle between each pair of adjacent ribs of the backbone. The stacks rest upon the base 20, thus helping to hold the unit in position. The stacks may be of any desired height, but it is contemplated that they will not extend beyond the lower margin of the display poster 22. Where the items stacks are of relatively light weight, such as boxes of cleaning tissue or the like, the presence of the backbone serves as a means to retain the stacks in the contemplated mass relation, and an inadvertent jolt upon any of the stacks will not result in collapse of the stacked items.

Obviously the display poster 22 may be embellished or printed on both sides, if desired, and under certain circumstances it may be desirable also to print indicia upon the faces of the upstanding ribs of the backbone, this embellishment becoming visible as the items in the stacks are removed by purchasers.

The removal of items from the massed display does not affect the stability of the present unit, and the main display poster 22 is thus retained constantly in association with the display, regardless of the number of merchandise items remaining to be sold.

In Figures 12 and 13 I have shown a modification whereby each of the ribs of the backbone is of two-ply thickness. Where this construction is employed, the basic stock may be thinner, e. g., of a thickness approximately 0.04 inch. The element 43 of Figure 12 has a width substantially twice as great as that of the corresponding element 2'7 of Figure 3. It is provided with longitudinal fold lines 44 lying about halfway between the center and the longitudinal edges, thus forming outer panels 45 which are folded inwardly and lie fiatwise against the corresponding mid-portion of the blank. Extensions 46 at the top are thus brought into registry with the extension 47 in the middle, producing an upstanding tongue corresponding to the tongue 33 of Figure 3. Similarly, projecting parts 48 at the bottom edge are brought into registry with corresponding parts 49 to form anchoring tabs like those shown at 26 in Figure 3. The superposed parts of the blank are held together by adhesive means or otherwise. Along the longitudinal center the element is provided with longitudinal slots 50 corresponding to the slots 30 shown in Figure 3.

The element 51 of Figure 13 is twice the width of each of the elements 28 and 29 of Figures 4 and 5. One element like that shown at 51 is required for each of the narrower ribs. By folding the material of the blank 51 upon itself along a medial longitudinal line 52, and retaining the superposed plies together by adhesive means or otherwise, a two-ply element is formed corresponding exactly to each of the elements shown in Figures 4 and 5. The projections 53 at the longitudinal sides of the element 51 come into registry to form tabs corresponding to those shown at 34 and 35.

The advantage of the two-ply formation of the ribs of the backbone, as indicated in Figures 12 and 13, lies in the fact that the basic stock may be printed or embellished entirely on one side, i. e., the side which is exposed outwardly when the manufacture has been completed.

A backbone formed of two-ply ribs and elements as indicated in Figures 12 and 13 is in every other respect like the backbone hereinbefore described.

In Figures 14 and 15 I have shown a modification of the display poster whereby the same benefit may be achieved, viz., that a single printing or embellishment on only one side of the blank will result in a desired advertising message or ornamentation on both sides of the display poster ultimately produced. The blank is in this case composed of two equal panels 54 and 55, folded upon each other along the connecting fold line 56. Along the edge opposite the line 56, the panel 55 is provided with a smaller panel 57 having a medial cut-out 53 corresponding to the cut-out 42 of Figure 8. In completing the manufacture of the display poster, the panel 57 is folded upwardly on to the inner (unprinted) face of the panel 55, and becomes sandwiched between the panels 54, 55, as indicated in Figure 15. Adhesive or other means are employed to hold the panels together, and in this respect the showing of Figure 15 is exaggerated. In actual practice, the superposed panels 54 and 55 are in direct contact, and the resultant display poster has a thickened three-ply lower margin provided with a pocket which fits over the upstanding tongue of the backbone in the manner hereinbefore described.

- It will be understood that many of the details herein described and illustrated may be modified in various respects without altering the basic nature of the unit, and without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as expressed in the appended claims. It is therefore intended that these details be considered as illustrative only.

Having thus described my invention what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

l. A knock-down cardboard display unit for a mass merchandise display involving a plurality of massed stacks of merchandise items, comprising a flat base of appreciable size adapted to underlie at least one of said stacks, and a backbone mounted upon and anchored to said base and adapted to extend vertically upward between said stacks, said backbone comprising radial ribs of flat character so arranged that a stack of merchandise items may be snugly accommodated in the angle between each pair of adjacent ribs, the base being provided with an upstanding section of two-ply thickness adapted to receive between its plies the lower end of at least one of said ribs, said upstanding section having a slot along its upper edge through which said lower rib end passes.

2. A knock-down cardboard display unit for a mass merchandise display involving a plurality of massed stacks of merchandise items, comprising a fiat base of appreciable side adapted to underlie at least one of said stacks, and a backbone mounted upon and anchored to said base and adapted to extend vertically upward between said stacks, said backbone comprising radial ribs of flat character so arranged that a stack of merchandise items may be snugly accommodated in the angle between each pair of adjacent ribs, said backbone comprising four radial ribs, one pair of alternate ribs lying substantially in the same plane, the base being provided with an upstanding section of two-ply thickness adapted to receive between its plies the lower ends of said aligned pair of ribs, said upstanding section having a slot along its upper edge through which said lower rib ends pass. I

3. A display unit as set forth in claim 2, said base being also provided with slits on opposite sides of said section adapted to receive anchoring tabs formed on the lower ends of the other two ribs respectively.

4. In a knock-down cardboard display unit, a base, a backbone mounted upon and extending upwardly from said base, and a display poster secured to the upper end of said backbone said backbone including a flat element having an upstanding tongue at its upper end, said poster being formed of a blank of cardboard stock doubled upon itself to define a thickened lower margin of threeply thickness, a part of the middle ply being cut away to form a pocket adapted to fit snugly over said tongue.

5. In a knock-down cardboard display unit, a base, a backbone mounted upon and extending upwardly from said base, and a display poster secured to the upper end of said backbone said backbone comprising four radial ribs and including a flat element defining a pair of said ribs extending in opposite directions, said element having an upstanding tongue at its upper end, the other ribs lying transversely with respect to the first-mentioned pair and having upper regions at the level of said tongue, said poster having a lower margin of three-ply thickness, a part of the middle ply being cut away to form a pocket adapted to fit snugly over said tongue, said upper regions of the transverse ribs snugly engaging said three-ply margin of the poster between them.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 102,047 Ruston Apr. 19, 1870 637,933 Horton Nov. 28, 1899 1,112,506 Weiss Oct, 6, 1914 1,555,554 Cohn Sept. 29, 1925 1,890,965 Boeye Dec. 13, 1932 1,934,846 Ebert Nov. 14, 1933 2,063,393 McIver Dec. 8, 1936 2,278,109 Karp et a1. Mar. 31, 1942 2,454,858 Burt Nov. 30, 1948 2,489,528 Goldstein Nov. 24, 1949 2,663,104 Hoagland Dec. 22, 1953 FOREIGN PATENTS 717,565 France Oct. 20, 1931

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3123207 *Nov 12, 1959Mar 3, 1964 Combination shipping container and display device
US3176419 *Oct 3, 1962Apr 6, 1965Eye Beam Displays IncDisplay assembly having a collapsible structural member
US3589046 *Apr 10, 1969Jun 29, 1971Charles C KirshbaumVertical display assembly
US4102276 *Jun 18, 1975Jul 25, 1978Bruno RoveroniDecorating or shelf system
US4488652 *Mar 14, 1983Dec 18, 1984The Mead CorporationMerchandising display connector means
US7140307 *Jan 29, 2004Nov 28, 2006Paul Wolbert, L.L.C.Display booth framework
DE1210312B *Mar 3, 1964Feb 3, 1966Schenley Ind IncAus Teilen eines Verpackungskartons herstellbarer Warenaufsteller
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/49.1, 211/72, 248/174
International ClassificationG09F1/00, A47B47/06
Cooperative ClassificationA47B47/06, G09F1/00
European ClassificationG09F1/00, A47B47/06