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Publication numberUS2750107 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 12, 1956
Filing dateMar 4, 1953
Priority dateOct 2, 1952
Publication numberUS 2750107 A, US 2750107A, US-A-2750107, US2750107 A, US2750107A
InventorsMore David
Original AssigneeGlacier Co Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Centrifugal oil cleaner, including a cylindrical filter
US 2750107 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

D. MORE June 12, 1956 CENTRIFUGAL OIL CLEANER, INCLUDING A CYLINDRICA-L FILTER Filed Maron 4, 1953 mm\\\\\\\\ l United States Patentfifice l2,750,107l Patented June 12, 1956 CENTRIFUGALVOIL CLEANER, rNcLUnlNGA CYLINDRICAL FILTER t David lMore, Scotstoun, Glasgow, Scotland, assignor, .lby

mesneassignments, to The Glacier Metal Company Limited, Alperton, Wembley, England, a corporation f Great Britain Application March 4, 1953, Serial No. 340,252 Claims priority, application Great Britain October 2, 19.52 4 claims. (Cl. zes- 2) This invention relates to centrifugal oil cleaners.

Intheinterest of brevity we shall hereafter assume that the liquid to be cleaned is fuel oil as lused fin compression ignition engines, but essentially the system is equally applicable to the cleaning of lubrication oil `orfother liquids. i

Experience has shown that the most leffective cleaner for fuel oil is a centrifuge including a `drum driven mechanically or electrically, or by jet'reactionas described Otherwise, the initial flow of fuel will be unfiltered, and

`there is also a great danger that any loose dirt in the centrifuge drum may be carried over and "cause lsevere 'wear to the engine injection equipment.

There may be loose vparticles of dirt inthe centrifuge `drum if the dirt consists of sandy material Without any gunimy constituent to bind it firmly to the drurn wall; rlhe solvent properties of the fuel oil and vibrationtend'to loosen the sandy cake from the vertical wall when -the drum is at rest.

Engines applied to road vehicles are subjected to frequent stopping and starting, and it is 'undesirablein applications of this class to have to employ anelaborate automatic gear toprovide the delay period during which drum speed is built'up before the fuel starts to flow. A

The .present invention has for an object to provide a centrifuge which can deliver finely filtered fuel immediately on starting.

According to the invention, in a Acentrifugal oil cleaner the centrifuge includes a rotatable drum and filter means so arranged that oil iiowing from the centrifuge drum passes through the filter means 4in a ccntripetal direction.

The drum may be fixed to,orrotatable with,"a`sp'indle formed with inlet and outlet passageways or ducts terminating in inlet and outlet openings through which oil is conducted into and out of the drum. Alternatively, the spindle may be fixed, the drum being supported by and rotatable about a fixed shaft. In another alternative the drum may be supported by and rotatable about two fixed stub shafts.

The inlet passageways or duct may terminate in at least one stand pipe parallel to and radially spaced from the axis of the drum, the inlet opening being the open end of the stand pipe which is preferably brought near the top of the drum.

The outlet opening may be at least one port in the wall of the spindle, or of the shaft, the filtering element being in the form of a cylinder co-axial with and surrounding the spindle or the shaft.

In a preferred construction, the centre portion of the spindle is formed with a broad annular groove from the bottom of which an opening leads to the discharge passageway or duct, a perforated sleeve surrounds the spindle, and a cylindrical filtering element surrounds the sleeve. Thefiltering element rotates with the drum at a rotational speed'such that the centrifugal force is great enough to prevent dirt deposits from forming on said element, and also great enough to throw off the dirt deposits which may have formed temporarily on said element during the startingup period.

The dirt collects on the inside of the drum and can be scraped out at convenient cleaning-periods. The filter- -ing element, being self-cleaning, requires no attention.

The filtering element may be made of a material hav, ing smaller interstices than is practicable ina conventional oil cleaner, because in conventional cleaners the deposits of `fine dirt which would build upon a fine grade element would be too dense and would quickly slow down land eventually block the flow through the element.

The filtering element may consist of dense felt, paper, porous metal, ceramic, etc., provided `these are constructed to resist :break-up or displacement when subjected lto -a high centrifugal force.

'The centrifuge operates well with a centrifugal force of 600 g at the filtering lelement and 1000 g at the mean radius of the dirt collection zone, but these values -are not critical, and should be regarded only as preferred minim for steady conditions.

`Only one fuel feed pump is required in conjunction with an oil cleaner as described because the output pressure from this pump can supply both the force for driving the drum and also the force to feed the fuel from `the centri- `fuge to the engine injection pump.

A practical 'embodiment of the invention in which the ydrum is rotated by jet reaction is illustrated inthe accompanying drawings in which Fig. l is a section on a horizontalplane through a filter, and Fig. 2 is a section through a'filter on the line 2 2 of Fig. l. u -In the drawings, 1 denotes a casing containing -a drum 2 `fixed to a spindle 3 formed with an axial inlet passageway or duct 4 connecting with inlet pipes 5, and formed withan axial oil outlet passageway orduct 6 open to a discharge 'connection 7 on the top of the lcasing 1. The .passageways 4 and 6 are in communication with `the 'exterior o f the casing through extensions 8 and 9 of the spindle, said extensions serving as journals supported in bearings in the casing 1. The central portion of the spindle 3 is provided with a broad annular groove 15 surrounded by aperforated sleeve 10 encased in a cylindrical filtering element 11. l12 denotes stand pipes open at the topend tothe interior of the drum and terminating at the lower` end in reaction nozzles of vwhich `'one is illustrat'ed at 13. V14 denotes a deposit of dirt on the inside of the drum 2. The 4passageway 4 is open to an oil supply connection 16. y

ln'practice, fuel is normally drawn 'from a fuel tank by an engine-driven feed pump which may be of the spring-loaded plunger type giving a nearly constant delivery pressure over a wide range of engine speeds. The fuel is fed under pressure to the drum 2 and enters the drum 2 through the inlet passageway 4 and the inlet pipes 5. As the drum rotates, centrifugal action separates and deposits dirt Von the drum wall.

Cleaned fuel for the engine passes through the filtering element 11 and out through the perforated sleeve 10 and the outlet passageway 6 in the spindle 3. The remainder of the fuel passes out through the pipes 12 and reaction nozzles 13. The fuel from the nozzles 13 drains directly back to the fuel tank.

Before reaching the engine, fuel from the cleaner may be conducted through an orifice or spring-loaded valve to reduce the fuel pressure to a convenient value.

An advantage associated with a reaction jet driven oil cleaner as described lies in the fact that on shut down of the cleaner an automatic reversal of flow takes place through the ltering element. The ow reversal occurs when the engine stops and the feed pump has ceased to deliver fuel. The drum momentum, however, causes the drum to spin for a short time before coming to rest. During this period the moving nozzles act as a pump and cause the oil to ow back out of the element, thus flushing the element and supplementing the normal centrifugal self-cleaning action.

An advantage connected with the use of stand pipes is that they prevent dirt, which may become loosened from the drum walls by the solvent properties of the fuel when the drum is at rest, from sliding down into the inlet and the jet passages.

Under any given operating conditions one series of inspection checks on the rate of dirt accumulation in the drum will indicate the desirable regular cleaning interval.

A cleaner as described can be used for the full ow or by-pass filtration of lubricating oil or other liquids.

What is claimed is:

1. An oil cleaner comprising a rotatable drum, an upright spindle extending axially through the drum and to which the drum is fixed for rotation therewith on an upright axis, oil inlet pipes in the drum parallel to the spindle and radially spaced therefrom and from the periphery of the drum, an oil inlet passageway in the lower portion of the spindle communicating with said oil inlet pipes for the delivery of oil to be cleaned to the interior of said drum, said oil inlet pipes terminating with open ends in the upper portion of the drum, an outlet passageway for clean oil in the upper portion of said spindle and opening into the drum above the oil inlet passageway in the spindle, a cylindrical filtering element surrounding the spindle arranged to filter oil flowing to the opening of the outlet passageway for clean oil, and means for rotating said drum, whereby the oil to be cleaned and delivered through said pipes into the upper portion of the drum is subjected to the centrifugal action produced by the rotation of the drum for the separation of dirt, which accumulates on the inner periphery of the drum, and oil owing to the opening from the drum to the outlet passageway in the upper portion of the spindle is passed through said cylindrical filtering element.

2. An oil cleaner as claimed in claim 1, including a perforated sleeve surrounding the major portion of the spindle in the drum and in spaced relation thereto, the said opening of the outlet passageway leading from the space between the spindle and the perforated sleeve, and said cylindrical filtering element encasing said perforated sleeve.

3. An oil cleaner comprising a rotatable drum, an upright spindle extending axially through the drum and to which the drum is fixed for rotation therewith on an upright axis, oil inlet pipes in the drum parallel to the spindle and radially spaced therefrom and from the periphery of the drum, an oil inlet passageway in the lower portion of the spindle communicating with said oil inlet pipes for the delivery of oil to be cleaned to the interior of said drum, said oil inlet pipes terminating with open ends in the upper portion of the drum, an outlet passageway for clean oil in the upper portion of said spindle and opening into the drum above the oil inlet passageway in the spindle, a cylindrical filtering element rotatable with the drum and surroundnig the spindle to lter oil flowing to the opening of the outlet passageway for clean oil, means for rotating said drum including at least one reaction nozzle having a tangential setting and arranged to deliver outside the drum, and means for conducting oil from the upper portion of said drum outside the cylindrical filtering element to the reaction nozzle, whereby the oil to be cleaned and delivered through said pipes into the upper portion of the drum is subjected to the centrifugal action produced by the rotation of the drum for the separation of dirt, which accumulates on the inner periphery of the drum, and oil flowing to the opening from the drum to the outlet passageway in the upper portion of the spindle is passed through said cylindrical filtering element.

4. An oil cleaner comprising a rotatable drum, an upright spindle extending axially through the drum and to which the drum is xed for rotation therewith on an upright axis, an oil inlet passageway in the lower portion of the spindle, conduit means rotatable with the drum communicating with said oil inlet passageway for the delivery of oil to be cleaned to the interior of said drum, said conduit means terminating and having an outlet in the upper portion of the drum in spaced relation to its periphery and to said spindle, an outlet passageway for clean oil in the upper portion of said spindle and opening into the drum above the oil inlet passageway in the spindle, a cylindrical filtering element surrounding the spindle arranged to filter oil owing to the opening of the outlet passageway for clean oil, and means for rotating said drum, whereby the oil to be cleaned and delivered through said conduit means into the upper portion of the drum is subjected to the centrifugal action produced by the rotation of the drum for the separation of dirt, which accumulates on the inner periphery of the drum, and oil owing to the opening from the drum to the outlet passageway in the upper portion of the spindle is passed through said cylindrical filtering element.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,468,740 Paul Sept. 25, 1923 1,619,652 Carter Mar. l, 1927 1,714,658 Carter May 28, 1929 2,087,778 Nelin July 20, 1937 2,257,107 Coberly Sept. 30, 1941 2,650,022 Fulton et al Aug. 25, 1953 FoREIGN PATENTS 2,420 Great Britain of 1912 13,074 Great Britain of 1914

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1468740 *Jan 23, 1922Sep 25, 1923Paul Jr Christian FCentrifugal separation and centrifugal filtration of liquids
US1619652 *Oct 23, 1926Mar 1, 1927Carter Benjamin CharlesCentrifugal separator
US1714658 *Dec 10, 1928May 28, 1929Carter Benjamin CharlesCentrifugal separator
US2087778 *Feb 4, 1936Jul 20, 1937Kone Ja Silta O Y Maskin Och BCentrifugal machine for filtering purposes
US2257107 *Aug 13, 1937Sep 30, 1941Roko CorpCentrifugal separator
US2650022 *Aug 24, 1950Aug 25, 1953Glacier Co LtdCentrifuge for cleaning liquids
GB191202420A * Title not available
GB191413074A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2984410 *May 19, 1958May 16, 1961Fiat SpaCentrifugal filter, more particularly for the lubricating oil of internal combustion engines
US3344927 *Aug 19, 1965Oct 3, 1967Michigan Dynamics IncPurifier
US3347380 *Oct 23, 1965Oct 17, 1967Michigan Dynamics IncCentrifugal purifier
US3432091 *Sep 21, 1966Mar 11, 1969Glacier Metal Co LtdCentrifugal fluid cleaners
US3847810 *May 4, 1973Nov 12, 1974A TulumelloApparatus for separating oil from water and measuring the amount of oil so separated
US4246108 *Oct 22, 1979Jan 20, 1981Dresser Industries, Inc.Microstrainer apparatus and method
US5674392 *Oct 19, 1995Oct 7, 1997Moatti Filtration S.A.Treatment assembly for treating a fluid by filtering and centrifuging
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US6464624Jun 12, 2001Oct 15, 2002Haemonetics CorporationBlood processing method and apparatus using a centrifugation bowl with filter core
US6629919Jan 18, 2001Oct 7, 2003Haemonetics CorporationCore for blood processing apparatus
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US7959547Nov 17, 2006Jun 14, 2011Hengst Gmbh & Co., KgCentrifuge for cleaning a liquid
US8454548Apr 14, 2008Jun 4, 2013Haemonetics CorporationSystem and method for plasma reduced platelet collection
US8628489Apr 14, 2008Jan 14, 2014Haemonetics CorporationThree-line apheresis system and method
US8647289Mar 31, 2011Feb 11, 2014Haemonetics CorporationSystem and method for optimized apheresis draw and return
US8702637Apr 14, 2008Apr 22, 2014Haemonetics CorporationSystem and method for optimized apheresis draw and return
US8808217May 2, 2013Aug 19, 2014Haemonetics CorporationSystem and method for plasma reduced platelet collection
US8808978Nov 15, 2010Aug 19, 2014Haemonetics CorporationSystem and method for automated platelet wash
US8834402Mar 12, 2009Sep 16, 2014Haemonetics CorporationSystem and method for the re-anticoagulation of platelet rich plasma
EP0812609A2 *Jun 6, 1997Dec 17, 1997Fram Europe LimitedCentrifugal filter
EP0995496A2 *Oct 20, 1999Apr 26, 2000Fleetguard, Inc.A centrifugal separator
WO2007079815A2 *Nov 17, 2006Jul 19, 2007Hengst Gmbh & Co KgCentrifuge for cleaning a liquid
Classifications
U.S. Classification494/36, 494/65, 494/49, 210/457, 210/360.1, 494/901
International ClassificationB04B5/00, F01M11/03, B04B1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB04B1/00, F01M2001/1035, Y10S494/901, B04B5/005
European ClassificationB04B1/00, B04B5/00B