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Publication numberUS2751036 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 19, 1956
Filing dateNov 4, 1954
Priority dateNov 4, 1954
Publication numberUS 2751036 A, US 2751036A, US-A-2751036, US2751036 A, US2751036A
InventorsGordon Busfield
Original AssigneeResearch Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrical precipitator
US 2751036 A
Images(5)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 19, 1956 G. BUSFIELD ELECTRICAL PRECIPITATOR Filed Nov. 4, 1954 5 Sheets-Sheet l 34 l/IO INVENTOR GORDON BUSFIELD ATTORNEY June 19, 1956 G. BUSFIELD 2,751,036

ELECTRICAL PRECIPITATOR Filed Nov. 4, 1954 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Ill/LII!!! INVENTOR GORDON BUSFIELD ATTORNEY June 19, 1956 G. BUSFIELD ELECTRICAL PRECIPITATOR 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Nov. 4, 1954 IN VENTOR GORDON BUSFIELD BY We/77AZ$% ATTORNEY June 19, 1956 G. BUSFIELD 2,751,036

ELECTRICAL PRECIPITATOR Filed 4 1954 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 I N VEN TOR GORDON BUSFIELD BY A M JM ATTORNEY June 19, 1956 G. BUSFIELD ELECTRICAL PRECIPITATOR 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Nov. 4, 1954 INVENTOR BUSFIELD BY M ATTORNEY ELECTRICAL PRECIPITATOR Gordon Bush-aid, Annandale, N. 1., assignor to Research Corporation, New York, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application November 4, 1954, Serial No. 466,757

11 Ciaims. (Cl. 183--7) The present invention relates to electrical precipitation apparatus and more particularly and specifically to water flushed or wet type electrostatic precipitators.

A principal object of the present invention lies in the provision of an electrical precipitator having a maximum capacity with a minimum of space requirement, and one which is capable of operating at high pressures and at maximum efficiencies.

Another object is to provide a new and improved precipitator tank construction which permits an assembly having the maximum strength requirements with utilization of minimum structural elements thereby reducing the space requirements and construction costs of the precipitator.

A further object of the instant invention lies in the provision of a new and improved structural assembly for an electrical precipitator which eliminates the heretofore costly knuckle construction common to precipitator domes and which provides for unique support of the internal partitioning assembly of the tank resulting in increased strength and rigidity and in simplified and inexpensive assembly.

Still another object is the improved structural assembly within an electrical precipitator utilized for locating the heads or upper ends of the collecting electrodes within the shell and for forming ponds around the head of each electrode for the flushing liquid.

Still a further object of this invention is the provision of collecting electrode supporting and collecting pond assemblies which eliminates costly spacing and steadying frames heretofore common in precipitator constructions and which provides for a plurality of individually removable and replaceable collecting electrode units thereby reducing time and labor costs in initial installation and in the repair and maintenance of the electrode system within the precipitator.

Yet another object is the provision of collecting electrode support constructions as above set forth which provides for lighter weight, yet stronger assemblies than have been heretofore utilized, and an assembly which is selfcleaning during operation.

An additional object of this invention is the provision of novel and unique alignment and support assemblies for the lower ends of the collecting electrodes which facilitate the assembly of the entire electrode system within the precipitator thereby reducing time and labor costs in assembly and repair.

Still additional objects of the present invention reside in the provision of structural details and assemblies constituting a new and improved precipitator construction which result in a more efiicient and less costly precipitator.

Still other and further objects and advantages of the present invention will become readily apparent to those skilled in the art as they are accomplished by the parts, constructions, arrangements, combinations and sub-cornbinations comprising the present invention, the nature of which is set forth in the following general statement, and a preferred embodiment of which is set forth in the folatent "ice lowing description and illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

The nature of the present invention may be stated in general terms as consisting of an electrical precipitator including a shell having a horizontal partition therein, saidpartition including a horizontal frame supporting a plurality of channel members thereacross in side by side relationship, each of said channel members supporting a plurality of vertical pipe collecting electrodes, means above said partition supporting a plurality of spaced discharge electrodes, one concentrically within each of said collecting electrodes, means in the lower region of said shell for positioning the lower ends of said collecting electrodes, means below the lower ends of said collecting electrodes for receiving and supporting the lower ends of said dis charge electrodes, a gas outlet in the shell above the partition, and gas inlet means including a plurality of conduits passing through the top of the shell and said partition to communicate with the shell interior below said partition.

Referring now to the accompanying drawings in which like designations indicate similar parts throughout the several views:

Fig. l is a side elevation in partial vertical section of the precipitator apparatus constituting the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary plan view of the apparatus illustrated in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged vertical section on line 3-3 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged vertical section on line 4-4 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical section of the support assembly for the lower end of the shell;

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary horizontal section on line 6-6 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 7 is an enlarged vertical section on line 77 of Fig. 6;

Fig. 8 illustrates a modification of the construction illustrated in Fig. 7;

Fig. 9 illustrates a further modification of the construction illustrated in Fig. 7;

Fig. 10 is a vertical section taken on line 1010 of Fig. 6;

Fig. 11 is a horizontal section taken on line 11-11 of Fig. 1; t

Fig. 12 is an enlarged vertical section taken on line 12-'-12 of Fig. 11;

Fig. 13 is a fragmentary horizontal section taken on line 13-13 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 14 is a fragmentary perspective view illustrating partof the construction shown in Fig. 13;

Fig. 15 is an enlarged fragmentary section taken on line 15-15 of Fig. 13; and

Fig. 16 is an enlarged fragmentary section taken on line 16-16 of Fig. 1.

Referring with particularity to Figs. 1 and 2 of the drawings, there is illustrated a preferred embodiment of the electrostatic precipitator constituting the present invention which includes in general terms a vertically extending casing or shell having a cylindrical central portion 10 and conical top and bottom portions 12 and 14 respectively. T he conical top is provided with peripheral, diametrically spaced gas outlets 16 and spaced gas inlets 18. The top is additionally provided with radially spaced insulator towers or compartments 20 from which are suspended vertically hanging rods 22 which support within the upper end of the shell a high tension bus bar, generally designated at 24-, for the discharge electrodes 26 of the precipitator.

The conical bottom 14 of the precipitator serves as a hopper, and has a central discharge outlet or drain 28 for the removal of precipitated material from within the precipitator, and the bottom is supported vertically by a plurality of legs or posts 30 radially spaced about the periphery thereof.

Located within the precipitator shell at a spaced distance below the conical top or head thereof is a partition, generally designated at 32, which divides the precipitator horizontally and which serves to support'in nested or banked relationship a plurality of collecting tube or pipe type electrodes 34. The electrodes 34 extend vertically below the partition Where their lower ends are securely positioned by a steadying frame 36 in the lower region of the precipitator immediately above a supporting frame 38 which engages the lower ends of the discharge electrodes 26.

' Considering in detail the construction of the conical top or head of the precipitator shell, as is best illustrated in Figs. 1 through 4, the head includes a plurality of pie shaped segments 40 extending outwardly from the central cylindrical tube 27, to which they are secured, to the upper edge of the central shell portion 10. Each of these segments 40 has on each of the elongated sides thereof a downturned flange 42, the adjacent flanges of adjacent segments being secured together by bolts 44 to form rafters 46 within the interior of the precipitator head. Each of the segments is provided along its arcuate edge, at its point of juncture with the upper end of the central shell portion 10, with a shelf angle 48 which serves to position the segment and secure the same when the angle is welded as at 50 to the central shell portion 10.

The spaced insulator compartments or towers are formed by vertical tubes 52 opening through the top segments which tubes are flanged at their upper ends to receive thereon a tubular housing 54. Housing 54 is flanged at each end thereof and is secured vertically to the upper end of the vertical tube 52, and which supports vertically from its upper end a second tubular housing 56 of reduced diameter. These towers form the supports for hanging rod 22 for the high tension support frames of the discharge electrodes in manners to be hereinafter described.

The conical bottom 14 of the precipitator shell is provided about its peripheral edge on the upper face thereof with spaced shelf angles 58, Fig. 5, each of which angles is welded to the conical bottom and to the inner wall of the central shell portion 10 at a point spaced above the lower extremity of the central shell portion 10. Additionally, the underside of the conical bottom 14 is provided with a second shelf angle 60 which is welded to the underside of the bottom and to the depending skirt portion of the central shell portion 10 where it extends below the peripheral edge of the bottom 14. This second shelf angle 60 is flanged horizontally as at 62 to form a base for the precipitator shell for attachment to the upper flanged end 64 of the bottom leg or post supporting the precipitator in its elevated position.

Supported vertically within the precipitator from points within the head portion thereof are two vertical dividers or baflles 66 which are located in diametrically opposed positions to extend in parallel with each other at points spaced outwardly from the interior of the central shell portion 10. These baflles 66 are supported by means of horizontally spaced angle brackets 68 which are welded or otherwise secured to the inner face of the central shell portion to extend horizontally inward for a spaced distance where their inner ends are similarly secured to the baffles. The vertical baffles extend in parallel horizontal directions across the precipitator to form a chord like division between the central portion of the precipitator and the arcuate segment defined between the battles and the inner wall of the central shell portion. These baffies extend vertically from the inner face of the conical top downwardly through approximately onethird of the depth of the precipitator where their lower ends are braced at their points of abutment with the inner wall of the central shell portion of the precipitator by brackets 70 secured to the inner face of the central shell portion.

As is best seen in Figs. 1 and 2 these partitions or baffles 66 are located beneath the gas inlets 18 in the top shell and are provided with inclined portions 72 at their upper ends extending upwardly and inwardly of the precipitator to terminate adjacent the inner face of the top shell immediately inwardly from the innermost edge of the gas inlets 18.

The particular arrangement and location of the battles 66 form together with the shell walls inlet conduits in communication with the gas inlets 18 extending vertically Within the precipitator to conduct incoming gases downwardly within the precipitator to be discharged through the lower ends of these conduits into the central region of the precipitator shell. The inner side wall of the central shell portion of the precipitator is provided with angular deflectors 74, one immediately beneath each of the inlet conduits defined by the vertical dividers 66 for the purpose of directing the incoming gases inwardly toward the central region of the precipitator.

The interior of the precipitator is provided with an H-shaped frame 76 composed of a plurality of sections of angle members which are supported Within the prccipitator. The leg portions of the H frame are supported on the inner faces of the vertical baffles 66 at points thereon above their lower ends and the cross bar of the H frame extends diametrically transverse the precipitator between the aforedescribed leg portions. The inner wall of the central shell portion 10 is provided with angular brackets '73 which are secured to the wall to extend between adjacent ends of the leg members of the H frame to provide shelves 80 therealong in continuation of the shelves 82 formed by the angular lips of the H frame members.

By this assembly the precipitator, intermediate the vertical baffles 66, is divided on a transverse center line into two equal sections which are provided about their entire periphery with shelves extending inwardly of the sections.

Associated with the H frame construction within the upper end of the precipitator is a partition formed of a plurality of elongated channel members 34 which are U-shaped in cross section and the ends of which are turned upwardly to the height of the side angles forming the U to enclose the ends and form a watertight trough. The channel members 84- are of identical width and are of staggered lengths to permit them to be seated in side by side relationship transversely of each half of the H frame being supported at each end by the shelves about the inner face of the central shell portion ll) and the shelves 82 on the cross member of the H frame. When a plurality of the channel members 84 are positioned in longitudinal juxtaposition as described they pro vide, together with the collecting electrodes, a gas-tight partition horizontally transverse the precipitator between the vertical baffles 66.

Each of the channel members in turn carry in longi tudinal spaced relationship throughout its length a plurality of the tube or pipe type collecting electrodes 34, the upper ends of which are secured in longitudinally spaced openings in the channel members, in a manner to be hereinafter described. The lower ends of the elcctrodes 34 depend vertically to terminate in the lower region of the precipitator. in this manner the partition composed of the plurality of channel members 84 forms a header for receiving and supporting the collecting electrodes of the precipitator.

With particular reference to Figs. 7 through 9 it may be seen that the upper ends of the tubular collecting electrodes 34 are inserted upwardly into the aforementioned openings in the channel members 84 where they are welded as at 86 about the periphery of the openings to secure the electrodes therein. In Fig. 7 it is seen that a collecting electrode 34 is secured in the opening of a amass channel member 8 4 with the upper end of the electrode located at an elevated position about the upper face of the bottom trough portion of the channel member. In Figs. 8 and 9 it may be seen that the upper end of the collecting electrode is welded with the opening in a channel member 34 so as to locate the upper end of the electrode substantially flush with the upper face of the trough bottom of the channel member. It is possible in either of the aforedescribed constructions to utilize weirs in conjunction with the upper ends of the collecting electrodes to control the amount of flush liquid entering the electrode from the liquid collected within the trough formed by the channel member 84, and to utilize weirs of fixed length or to utilize weirs adjustable longitudinally relative to the end 5 of the collecting electrodes to permit selective variations in the rate of flush fluid flow into the electrodes.

in the construction illustrated in Fig. 7 where the upper end of the electrode 34 is located in elevated position above the trough bottom of the channel member 84 a weir attachment 8% is assembled in conjunction with the upper extended end of the electrode to provide for selective adjustable control of flushing fluid flow from the collection trough formed by the channel member into the tubular electrode.

Associated with the tubular weir member is an adjustable binding strap 92 having a buckle member 94 which strap is secured circumferentially about the outer face of the weir adjacent the electrode receiving end thereof for the purpose of tightening the weir in selective longitudinal positions relative to the upper extended end of the electrode. By this arrangement it is possible to control the entry of flushing liquid collected in the trough-like channel member into the electrode with respect to the depth of the pond collected in the trough.

In Fig. 8 a modified weir construction is illustrated wherein the upper end of the electrode 34 is secured substantially flush with the bottom of the trough-like channel member, the weir member 96 taking the form of a short tubular section having a perpendicular flange annularly about one end thereof, the tube flaring outwardly toward the second open end. The weir 96 is of fixed height and is secured with the flange 98 positioned concentrically about the upper open end of the electrode secured through a circular gasket 1% to the bottom of the trough-like channel member by bolts 1 32 or the like. This construction provides a weir of fixed height for preselected regulation of flushing fiuid fiow from the collection pond in the channel member into the collecting electrode.

Referring to Fig. 9 there is illustrated a further embodiment of an adjustable weir which includes an open ended tubular section flared outwardly toward one end thereof with the second end being of such a reduced diameter as to permit it to telescope downwardly within the upper open end of the collecting electrode 34.

in this last-named embodiment a gasket 104 is seated on the bottom of the trough-like channel member concentrically about the collecting electrode opening and a circular metallic ring member 166 is seated on the gasket and secured through the gasket by bolts 108 or the like to the bottom of the trough-like channel member. The metallic ring 1% carries at one or more points about the upper face thereof vertically extending anchor blocks 114? which support horizontally extending set screw binding pins 112 which are engageable with the outer face of the tubular weir to lock it in selected vertical positions longitudinally of the open end of the collecting electrode 34.

Located in the lower region of the precipitator interior at a spaced distance above the lower ends of the coliecting electrodes 34 is the steadying frame 36 which locates and aligns the lower ends of the electrodes relative to their location and support in the channel members 84. As is best seen in Fig. 16, the steadying frame 6 includes a plurality of flat bar members 114 which extend between and are welded to the lower ends of each collecting electrode supported by a single channel member 84 whereby pipes in each channel member 84 are in vertical alignment. At degrees to the longitudinal axis of the bar members 114 spacer members 116, in the form of flat bars, are welded to alternate rows of pipes 34. The length of the flat bars 116 are of such length that they will just touch the pipes of an adjacent assembly. After the entire assembly of pipes has been placed in the precipitator shell, the end spacing bar 116 may be welded to the adjacent pipes, thus tieing the whole assembly of units into a single unit. Thi form of construction has been found to substantially speed the field erection of the precipitator.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 11 there is illustrated a high tension frame 24 for supporting the discharge electrodes 26 within the precipitator. The high tension frame is divided into two sections, each of which includes a main frame bar 124 which extends transversely of the precipitator in a central location above one section of the channel members 84 therebeneath. Each of the main frame members 124 supports a plurality of secondary U-shaped frame members 126 which are vertically aligned one above each of the individual channel members 84 constituting the partition 32.

Each of the secondary frame members carries in spaced relationship along its length a plurality of platform members 12% supported perpendicularly of the frame member therebeneath by means of rivets or the like 13% Each end of each platform 123 carries a cup-like attachment 132 which is secured to the platform by means of a bolt 134 to extend outwardly in overhanging position beyond the end of the platform. In this manner a cup-like member 132 is located in direct vertical alignment above each of the collecting electrodes 34 supported by the channel members 84 forming the partition 32 at a spaced distance beneath the high tension frame.

The bottom of each of the cup-like members 132 is provided with a tapered opening 138 into which is received a tapered fitting 135 secured to the upper extended end of one of the discharge electrodes 26. The tapered fitting 136 is ribbed or grooved through its length to provide for liquid flow from within the cup 132 downwardly onto the discharge electrode 26. Thus the flushing liquid sprayed within the precipitator will collect in the cup member 132 and will have a trickle type flow through the tapered opening 138 around the grooved fitting 135 onto the discharge electrode 26.

With the collecting electrodes supported from the cuplike members 132 in the high tension frame in the manner aforedescribed, each of the electrodes will be suspended vertically and concentrically one in each of the collecting electrodes 34 supported from the partition 32. The discharge electrodes 26 are of a length to extend for a spaced distance below the lower ends of the collecting electrodes where they are secured in the discharge wire supporting frame 38.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 13 through 15 there is illustrated a preferred embodiment of the discharge Wire supporting frame 38 which includes a plurality of flat bar members 140 which extend in perpendicular groups of parallel members forming a framework wherein the intersecting bars of each parallel group are provided with corresponding notches 142 to cause them to retain their interlocked relationship. The number and location of the fiat bars constituting the frame 38 are such as to position the parallel bars in one direction transversely of the precipitator in vertical alignment intermediate depending adjacent rows of discharge electrodes. Each bar in the last-named group is provided in spaced relationship along its length with a laterally extending bridge member 144 welded to the bar and engaging at each end thereof by means of down-turned fingers 146 within sockets 148 in the upper ends of elongated tubular weights 150. Each of the weights 150 is provided with a central passage 152 longitudinally therethrough having a sleeve 154 extending throughout its length. Extending upwardly through the passage 152 in each of the weights 150 is a shroud tube 156 removably coupled as at 158 beneath the weight to project upwardly beyond the upper end thereof and telescopically, frictionally receive downwardly therein the lower end of a discharge electrode 26.

By this construction the lower ends of the discharge electrodes are retained in a weighted framework which is suspended free of the precipitator on the lower ends of the electrodes thereby serving to maintain the electrodes in proper spaced relationship and to sufiiciently weight their lower ends to maintain them in vertical positions.

Operation The operation of the electrical precipitator aforedeseribed is substantially conventional in that flue gases are introduced into the precipitator through the inlets 18 in the top of the shell from which they are conducted downwardly in the conduits defined between the shell walls and the vertical bafiles 66 to be discharged at a central point within the precipitator below the gas-tight partition 32 formed by the H frame and the channel members 84 supported thereon. From the central region the gases flow upwardly through the collecting electrodes where they enter the top of the shell and are discharged through the outlets 16.

The precipitator describe d being a wet-type precipitator accordingly includes provision for spraying a liquid, usually water, from a point in the upper head region of the precipitator so that the water is permitted to collect in the cups 132 supporting the discharge electrodes and in the troughs formed by the channel members 34. The water thus collected is permitted to trickle downwardly along the discharge electrodes from the cup members 132 in the manner previously described, and the ponds formed in the troughs of the channel members 34 are allowed to overflow the weir members on the upper ends of the collecting electrodes to run down inside the collecting electrodes for the conventional purposes.

Accordingly, it may be seen from the foregoing description that a unique and novel precipitator construction has been provided which includes numerous novel details of construction serving to produce in combination a precipitator which functions to produce substantial new and useful results over prior constructions.

It is evident that the forms of the invention herein disclosed provide a precipitator which has the advantages of maximum capacity yet which is compact and space conserving and which is so constructed as to be capable of operation under super-atmospheric pressures at maximum efficiencies.

it is further apparent that the constructions heretofore described provide for the assembly and support of both the discharge and collecting electrodes of the precipitator in such a manner as to permit isolated units in either system to be removed for replacement or repair purposes in an extremely simple and rapid manner, said constructions also providing, by reason of the manner in which the flushing fluid is collected and discharged, a substantially self-cleaning electrode system.

It is also evident that the constructions embodied in the present invention provide for simplified construction, assembly and repair of the parts and combinations constituting the inventive construction and that numerous improved details of the construction serve to produce new and useful results.

Having now described my invention, the construction and operation of the preferred embodiments thereof and the advantageous new and useful results obtained thereby, what I desire to claim is:

1. An electrical precipitator including a vertical shell, a horizontal partition dividing the shell intermediate the height of said shell, said partition including a plurality of individual elongated trough members, said trough members comprising an elongated box like structure having a base portion and upstanding side portions to provide support and liquid ponds for a plurality of spaced surface collecting electrodes, an assembly of complementary discharge electrodes supported in spaced relation to said collecting electrodes, gas outlet means in said shell above the partition, and gas inlet means communicating with the shell below said partition.

2. An electrical precipitator including a vertical shell, a :crizontal partition dividing the shell intermediate the height of said shell, said partition including a frame divlding the shell into two sections, each frame section supporting a plurality of separable elongated trough members in side by side relationship, said trough members comprising an elongated box like structure having a base portion and upstanding side portions to provide support and liquid ponds for a plurality of spaced surface collecting electrodes secured therein and depending therebelow, an assembly of complementary discharge electrodes supported in spaced relationship to said collect- "ig electrodes, gas outlet means in said shell above said partition, and gas inlet means communicating with the shell below said partition.

3. Av precipitator construction as defined in claim 2 including a frame located in the lower region of said shell to extend horizontally transverse the precipitator, said frame being provided with means for engaging and positioning the lower end of said collecting electrodes aligning them vertically of said shell, and a second frame located below below said first-named frame including means for receiving the lower end of said discharge electrodes to retain them in properly spaced relationship relative to said collecting electrodes.

4. An electrical precipitator including a vertical shell having top and bottom and enclosing members, baffle means in said shell defining in cooperation with the walls of said shell diametrically opposite gas passages extending for a spaced distance vertically below the top head of said shell, a horizontal partition dividing the shell transversely between said bafiies intermediate the length thereof, said partition including a plurality of individual elongated trough members, said trough members com prising an elongated box like structure having a base portion and upstanding side portions to provide support and liquid ponds for a plurality of spaced surface collecting electrodes, an assembly of complementary discharge electrodes supported in spaced relationship to said collecting electrodes, gas outlet means in said shell above the partition, and gas inlet means communicating with those gas passages defined by said bafiies.

5. An electrical precipitator including a vertical shell having top and bottom end enclosing members, baffle means in said shell defining in cooperation with the walls of said shell diametrically opposite gas passages extending for a spaced distance vertically below the top head of said shell, a horizontal partition dividing the shell transversely between said bafiles intermediate the lengths thereof, said partition including a frame dividing the shell into two sections, each frame section supporting a plurality of separable elongated trough members in side by side relationship, said trough members comprising an elongated box like structure having a base portion and upstanding side portions to provide support and liquid ponds for a plurality of spaced surface collecting electrodes secured therein and depending therebelow, an assembly of complementary discharge electrodes supported in spaced relationship to said collecting electrodes, gas outlet means in said shell above said partition, and gas inlet means communicating with said gas passages.

6. An electrical precipitator including a vertical cylindrical shell, a conical head enclosing the bottom of said shell, a conical top enclosing the upper end of said shell, said conical top including a centrally located vertically extending tube, a plurality of pie-shaped panels extend- 9 ing radially outward from said tube to the upper peripheral edge of said shell, the adjacent edges of said panels being flanged inwardly of the head and secured one to the other forming rafters, radially spaced tower members supported in the upper face of said top, diametrically spaced gas inlet and gas outlet openings in said top adjacent the peripheral edge thereof, bafiie means extending vertically within said shell from the inner face of the top downwardly for a spaced distance therebelow and located inwardly from the wall of said shell and defining in cooperation therewith vertical conduits communicating with said inlets in the top of said shell, a partition dividing the shell transversely between said baffles intermediate their length, said partition being a top header for a plurality of spaced collecting electrodes, and an assembly of complementary discharge electrodes supported in spaced relationship to said collecting electrodes.

7. A precipitator construction as defined in claim 6 wherein said partition includes a horizontal frame dividing the shell into two sections transversely between said baffies, each frame section supporting a plurality of separable elongated trough members in side by side relationship, and said collecting electrodes having their upper ends secured in spaced relationship in said trough members.

8. In an electrical precipitator including a shell having a horizontal partition therein, a plurality of vertical pipe collecting electrodes and associated discharge electrodes passing through the partition, said partition consisting of a frame extending transversely of the shell, continuous horizontal shelf means formed about said frame, and a plurality of elongated trough members supported between opposed shelves on said frame in side by side relationship completely enclosing said frame, said trough members comprising an elongated box like structure having a base portion and upstanding side portions to provide support and liquid ponds for the upper ends of a plurality of said collecting electrodes, a gas outlet in the shell above said partition, and gas inlet means communicating with said shell below said partition.

9. In an electrical precipitator including a shell having a horizontal partition therein, a plurality of vertical pipe collecting electrodes secured in and depending from said partition, a frame supported in parallel spaced relationship above said partition, a plurality of brackets secured in spaced relationship on said frame, each of said brackets supporting cup-like members in vertical alignment one above each of said collecting electrodes, a tapered opening in the bottom of said cup-like members, a tapered plug-like fitting seated in each of said openings and provided longitudinally with grooves along its length, and each of said plug-like fixtures supporting a discharge electrode vertically therebeneath concentrically within the collecting electrode aligned thereunder.

10. A precipitator construction as defined in claim 9 wherein the lower end of each of said discharge electrodes is frictionally telescoped within and supports a tubular weight, adjacent weights on adjacent electrodes transversely of said shell being coupled by a bridging member, and said bridging members being secured in parallel rows transversely of said shell to bar members, and said bar members having perpendicular cross bars rigidly interconnecting the same to form a frame.

11. In an electrical precipitator including a vertical shell, a horizontal partition dividing the shell intermediate the height thereof, said partition including a plurality of trough-like members supported in side by side relationship, said trough-like members comprising an elongated box like structure having a base portion and upstanding side portions to provide support and liquid ponds for the upper ends of a plurality of vertical pipe collecting electrodes suspended therefrom, a system of discharge electrodes associated with said collecting electrodes, gas outlet means above said partition, gas inlet means below said partition, means for spraying liquid on the upper face of said partition forming collected ponds in said trough-like members, and weir members associated one with each of said collecting electrodes, said weirs being adjustable telescopically of said collecting electrodes whereby fluid flow from said ponds into said electrodes may be selectively controlled.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2648394 *Aug 28, 1951Aug 11, 1953Research CorpElectrical precipitator
US2701028 *Oct 31, 1951Feb 1, 1955Research CorpElectrical precipitator
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3053029 *Nov 25, 1959Sep 11, 1962Electronatom CorpGas conditioner
US3703799 *Oct 22, 1969Nov 28, 1972Humphreys Wendell LewisDischarge electrode tensioning means
US4722743 *Jul 21, 1986Feb 2, 1988Combustion Engineering, Inc.Collecting electrode panel assembly
US4968330 *Sep 1, 1989Nov 6, 1990Fmc CorporationApparatus for separating particulates in an electrostatic precipitator
US5395430 *Jul 18, 1994Mar 7, 1995Wet Electrostatic Technology, Inc.Electrostatic precipitator assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification96/45
International ClassificationB03C3/16, B03C3/02
Cooperative ClassificationB03C3/16
European ClassificationB03C3/16