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Publication numberUS2751075 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 19, 1956
Filing dateJul 17, 1951
Priority dateJul 17, 1951
Publication numberUS 2751075 A, US 2751075A, US-A-2751075, US2751075 A, US2751075A
InventorsArneson Lawrence E
Original AssigneeMorris Paper Mills
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carton for packaging clusters of cylindrical objects
US 2751075 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

june 19, '1956 E, ARNESQN 2,75L05 CARTON FOR PACKAGING CLUSTERS OF CYLINDRICAL OBJECTS Filed July 17, 1951 CARTN FOR PACKAGING CLUSTERS F CYLINDRICAL OBJECTS Lawrence E. Arneson, Morris, Ill., assignor to Morris Paper Mills, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Illinois Application July 17, 1951, Serial No. 237,207

4 Claims. (Cl. 206--'-65) The present invention relates to a package comprising a pasteboard carton and a cluster of cylindrical beverage cans or similar objects packaged thereby in justaposed parallel rows.

One object of the invention is to provide a new and improved package of this sort in which a carton embraces six sides of a cluster of cylindrical containers, which carton is so shaped and fashioned that the pasteboard blank from which the carton is erected can be formed from considerably less stock material than that requisite to the fabrication of conventional cartons used for the same purpose. A related object is to provide a paperboard blank for a carton of this type having closure liaps shaped and arranged in a novel fashion which, in practice, affords stronger and more efficient glued joints between overlapping portions of the flaps that are brought together upon erection of the carton.

Another object is to provide a carton package capable of binding containers into snug engagement with each other to form a unit which is extremely compact.

It is a further object to provide a can package, as described in the preceding paragraph, in which the cans are well protected but in which the beaded edges of the cans and not the carton take the brunt of the wear and abuse incident to handling. It is a relatedobject to provide a carton in which the tendency of the edges of the enclosed cans to cut through the carton is minimized, thereby making feasible the use of thinner stock materials in the construction of the carton.

In conjunction with the foregoing objects, another object is to provide a carton having a strikingly distinctive and attractive appearance which admirably adapts the carton for use in the retail trade in which the carton and its contents are normally sold as a unit.

Additional and related objects include the provision of a carton which effectively displays portions of the containers packaged within the carton, which facilitates refrigeration of the containers while packaged in the carton, and which may be conveniently and safely handled.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent as the description proceeds.

In the accompanying drawing:

Figure l is a perspective view illustrating six beverage cans packaged in the carton provided by the invention.

Fig. 2 is a perspective View of the carton blank used to form the carton of Fig. l.

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary view of one corner of the package of Fig. l showing the position of the closure aps at an intermediate stage in the erection of the carton.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along line 4*@1 of Fig. l.

Fig. 5 is a schematic view illustrating an exemplary form of mass production apparatus as used to firmly press agglutinated surfaces of overlapping parts of the carton into iirm mutual engagement.

While the invention is susceptible of various modifications and alternative constructions, there is shown in the 2,751,075 Patented June 19, 1956 drawing and will herein be described in detail the preferred embodiment, but it is to be understood that it is not thereby intended to limit the invention to the form disclosed, but it is intended to cover all modifications and alternative constructions falling within the spirit and scope of the invention as expressed in the appended claims.

it will be apprehended that certain features of the present invention as revealed in the following description are susceptible of wide usage in cartons designed for packaging assemblages of cylindrical objects. However, the carton or packaging device 10 constituting the preferred embodiment of the invention, shown in the drawing, is particularly suited for packaging a cluster or nest of cylindrical containers of the tin can type widely used in the preservation and distribution of food and bevereages by the food processing and brewing industries.

As indicated in Fig. l, the carton 1U is fashioned to mechanically embrace all six sides of a cluster 11 of six cans 12 arranged in two juxtaposed parallel rows. The blank 14, Fig. 2, from which the carton is erected is formed from a generally rectangular sheet of pasteboard having transverse parallel crease lines 16 thereon sectioning the sheet into two side panels 17 and two end panels 19 arranged in alternate relation to each other. Packaging of the cluster 11 is normally initiated by placing the cans 12 on end on one of the blank end panels 19, with the can axes arranged parallel in similar orientation, and folding the blank around the cluster to bring the other end panel 19 into overlying engagement with the opposite ends of the cans and to dispose the side panels 17 alongside opposite sides of the cluster. To hold the partially erected carton in this enveloping relation to the cluster 11, the outermost end panel 19 on the blank 14 is secured to the outermost side panel 17 preferably by gluing the marginal side edge of one of the panels in overlapping relation to a narrow retaining tiap 20 formed on the opposite end of the blank and set olf from the other panel by a crease line 21 parallel to the crease lines 16.

The sides of the cans 12 at the ends of the cluster rows are embraced by closure flaps 22 and 24 integrally formed on opposite ends of the end panels 19 and side panels 1'7 respectively and folded across the ends of the can rows and glued into overlapping engagement with each other.

In accordance with the present invention, the vend panels 19, side panels 17, and closure flaps 22, 24 of the carton 1t) are shaped and arranged in a novel manner which provides more secure glued jointsbetween the end iiaps with a minimum of overlap between the adjacent flaps and which at the same time effects a very substantial reduction in the amount of pasteboard stock material requisite to the formation of the carton blank 14 as cornpared to that used in the manufacture of conventional cartons with a comparable packaging capacity. To this end, the side closure flaps 24 and coacting portions of the end closure flaps 22 are fashioned to fit snugly around the arcuate side walls of the cans 12 defining the respeta-v tive corners of the cluster 11.

As shown, the carton end panels 19 are made coeXtentive in width and length with corresponding dimensions of the cluster 11 and are formed with rounded corners 25 designed to coincide with the annular rims 26 of the cans 12 at the corners of the cluster. In laying out the end panels 19 on the blank 14 the extremities of the corners 25 are defined by arcs of circles approximately tangent the adjacent edges of the panels and having radii substantially equal to those of the can rims 26. However,

sharp notches at the junctures of the end panels 19 with the adjoined side panels 17 and end flaps 22, the arcuate extensions of opposite ends of each rounded corner are stopped somewhat short of a point of tangency with the adjacent panel edges. The radial distance between each end of each corner 25 and the adjacent panel edge is spanned by a rounded llet 27 which elfectively avoids undesirable stress concentrations in the structure material of the carton.

The end closure flaps 22 are integrally attached to opposite ends of the end panels 19 between the contiguous rounded corners 25, the flaps being sectioned from the panels by crease lines 29. As shown, each end flap 22 extends transversely in opposite directions beyond its line of attachment to the adjacent end panel 19 to define two elongated ears 30 which together with the medial portion of the flap have an overall length substantially equal to the width of the end panels. The ears 30 are covered with glue on one side and are preferably sectioned by crease lines 31 from the medial portion of the respective end aps to facilitate bending the ears around the corner can walls upon assembly of the carton.

The side panels 17 are substantially shorter in leng than the cnd panels 19 and extend only to the inner extremity of the rounded corners 25 on the end panels. Thus, in the preferred embodiment shown, opposite ends of the side panels 17 extend slightly beyond the lines of tangency of the panels with the end cans 12 in the cluster. Stated ditferently, the length of the side panels 17 inthis preferred construction is shorter than the overall length of the cluster 11 by a distance equal to approximately two thirds the diameter of one of the cans 12.

The side closure flaps 24 are formed as integral extensions of opposite ends of the respective side panels 17 and are preferably sectioned from the side panels by crease lines 32. Upon erection of the carton 1d, these side aps 24 are wrapped tightly around the cylindrical can surface at the corners of the cluster 11 and brought into overlapping engagement with the glue covered ears 30 of the end closure flaps 24, Figs. l and 3. It will be understood that the glue can be applied to the underside of the flaps 24 rather than to the ears 30.

The overlapping portions of the closure flaps 22, 24 thus Wrapped around the cans 12, in approximate endwise alignment with corresponding rounded ends 25 of panels 19, are solidly backed by the underlying can walls substantially to the full extent of the overlapping area of the flaps, Fig. 4. Thus the can walls form anvils against which the overlapping portions of the aps can be pressed to bring their contiguous covered surfaces into the rm mutual engagement requisite to the formation of a strong agglutinated bond between the flaps.

Application of pressure over the arcuate overlapping portions of the flaps 22, 24 can be conveniently carried out by the automatic packaging machinery used in erecting the cartons. Although such machines may be of any suitable character, they may as indicated in Fig. 5 comprise two opposed lug belts 34 defining pairs of opposed curved faces 35 adapted to embrace opposite ends of a train of erected cartons 10 in a manner designed to apply an even pressure to the corners of the cartons.

Since the bond which is effected between overlapping portions of the closure aps 22, 24 is coextensive with the overlapping areas of the iiaps, the overall strength of the bond is exceedingly high. As a consequence, the extent to which the flaps must be overlapped in order to be securely held together is reduced to a minimum. Thus it has been found that for ordinary packaging purposes the width of the end closure flaps 22 need not be greater than approximately one fifth of the total height of the cans 12. Similarly, the side closure flaps 24 are made only wide enough to extend slightly beyond the rounded corners 25 of the end panels 19.

In the preferred construction shown, the side closure flaps 24 are so dimensioned that the overall length of each side panel 17 and its attached closure flaps is equal to the combined length of the end panels 19 and their attached closure aps 22. Thus applicant has provided a very sturdy carton having narrow closure liaps 22 and 24 and short side panels 17 which adapts the carton for formation from an exceedingly narrow blank 14. In fact, the area of the sheet of pasteboard required for the formation of the blank 14 isv approximately twentylive percent less than that used in the manufacture of conventional cartons of similar capacity.

Further advantages of the carton provided by the invention reside in the degree of snugness with which it holds the packaged containers in contact with each other. After the cans 12 are forced into close Contact at the time pressure is applied to the rounded corners of the carton in effecting the seal between the closure flaps 22, 24, they are securely held together by the flaps which are virtually wrapped around the end portions of the cluster 11. As shown, the snugness with which the carton 10 grips the cluster 11 is increased by narrowing the ears 30 and shortening the side flaps 24 sufficiently to engage only the cylindrical walls of the cans 12 and not the can rims 26.

By virtue of the binding action of the carton 10 on the cluster 11, vibration and chattering of the cans 12 incident to handling and transporting the package is restrained and the normal tendency of the can rirns 26 to cut through the walls of the carton is minimized. Moreover, the corners of the carton are solidly buttressed by the cans which absorb the force of blows and thereby protect the carton corners from distortion and disruption. As a consequence, it is feasible to fabricate the carton blank 14 from stock materials which are substantially thinner than those used in conventional cartons. The savings realized from the use of the thinner stock materials in the manufacture of the present carton are, of course, in addition to those stemming from the use of blanks of a smaller overall size.

The rounded corners of the carton 10 give it a pleasingly neat appearance which is of special importance in making the package attractive to customers in the retail trade.

Moreover, the sizable rectangular openings 36 defined by the edges of the closure aps 22, 24 at opposite ends of the carton effectively display the packaged cans 12 to the customer. Also, the openings 36 permit the circulation of cooling air through the carton to expedite refrigeration of the cans 12, which feature particularly adapts the carton for packaging canned beer, which is oftentimes refrigerated in the package.

It will be perceived that the end flaps 22 at the upper and lower ends of each opening 36 form convenient handles by which the carton can be easily carried in the hand.

I claim as my invention:

l. A can package comprising a generally rectangular cluster of cylindrical cans arranged in corresponding axial orientation, and a one-piece carton enclosing the same, including a plurality of generally rectangular adjoined panels including two end panels and two side panels arranged in alternate relation to each other, each of said end panels engaging non-cylindrical surfaces of the cans of said cluster, being equal in length to the cluster and having four corners rounded and positioned to conform generally to the annular edges of the cans defining the respective corners of the cluster, said side panels being substantially shorter in length than said end panels, and closure flaps on opposite ends of said side panels and said end panels, said closure aps of said side panels being wrapped around the arcuate corners of the cluster and shaped by said arcuate corners in snug engagement with the contiguous cylindrical walls of the cans, said closure aps of said end panels extending toward one another and parallel to the axes of the cans in contining engagement with an end ofthe cluster, said end panel closure llaps having lateral extensions secured in overlapped engagement with said side panel flaps to hold the respective panels to extend across opposite ends of the cluster and to dene sizable openings in opposite ends of said carton.

2. A package comprising a plurality of cylindrical beverage cans or the like having beaded top and bottom edges and arranged in a rectangular cluster, and a carton therefor comprising the combination of end panels of generally rectangular shape engaging the tops and bottoms respectively of the cans, said panels having rounded corners corresponding generally to the curvature of the cans at said corners, and side panels hinged to side margins of said end panels and forming with said end panels a continuous band disposed snugly around said Vcluster and shaped by the corner cnrvatures of the cluster so as to bind the cans together, said end and side panels hav ing ap members spaced vertically from said end panels to provide slots at the rounded corners through which the beads of the corner cans are exposed to absorb the abrasion occurring at said corners during the course of handling, said respective flap members being overlapped and secured together around said corners.

3. A package comprising a plurality of cylindrical beverage cans or the like having beaded top and bottom edges and arranged in a rectangular cluster, and a carton therefor comprising the combination of end wall forming panels of generally rectangular shape engaging the tops and bottoms respectively of the cans, said end wall panels having rounded corners corresponding generally to the curvature of the cans at said corners, and side Wall forming panels hinged to side margins of said end wall panels and forming with said end wall panels a continuous band disposed snugly around said cluster and shaped by the corner curvatures of the cluster so as to bind the cans together, said end wall panels having laterally projecting extension flaps conformed around said curvatures and secured to said side wall panels, said extension ilaps being spaced from said side wall panels at the rounded corners a vertical distance approximating the vertical dimension of the can beads so that the beads of the corner cans thereby exposed between said extension aps and said side wall panels may absorb the abrasion occurring at said corners during the course of handling.

4. A can package comprising a generally rectangular cluster of cylindrical cans arranged in corresponding axial orientation, and a one-piece carton enclosing the same, said carton including two end Wall forming panels and two side wall forming panels arranged in alternate relation to each other, each of said end wall panels engaging non-cylindrical surfaces of the cans of said cluster, being equal in length to the cluster and having four corners rounded and positioned to conform generally to the annular edges of the cans dening the respective corners of the cluster, said side wall panels being substantially shorter in length than said end Wall panels, and closure ilaps on opposite ends of said side and end wall panels, said closure laps of said side Wall panels being wrapped around the arcuate corners of the cluster and shaped by said arcuate corners in snug engagement with the contiguous cylindrical walls of the cans, said closure ilaps of said end wall panels extending toward one another and parallel to the long axes of the cans and in confining engagement with an end of the cluster, said end wall panel closure flaps having lateral` extensions secured in overlapped engagement with said side wall panel closure flaps to hold the respective closure aps in extended relation across opposite ends of the cluster and to define sizable openings in opposite ends or. said carton, the lateral extensions on said end Wall panel closure llaps being spaced vertically from said end wall panels to afford openings at the corners of the carton through which upper and lower edges of the cans are exposed.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Re. 13,812 Miller Oct. 20, 1941 920,480 Kenny May 4, 1909 1,892,715 Wellmann Jan. 3, 1933 2,269,113 Kasch Jan. 6, 1942 2,285,399 Arneson June 9, 1942 2,391,639 Meller Dec. 25, 1945 2,564,449 Ringler Aug. 14, 1951 2,603,923 Chidsey July 22, 1952 2,611,527 Fisher Sept. 23, 1952 FOREIGN PATENTS 394,134 France Nov. 19, 1908

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2926782 *Jan 9, 1956Mar 1, 1960Andre Matic Machinery CompanyCarrier for cans and handle
US2936069 *Nov 8, 1957May 10, 1960Waldorf Paper Products CoCan carriers
US3042194 *Feb 16, 1959Jul 3, 1962Packaging Corp AmericaCarton and package including same
US3056494 *Mar 31, 1959Oct 2, 1962Diamond National CorpPackaging
US3143210 *Nov 16, 1959Aug 4, 1964Heydon John JCan package
US4919266 *Jun 9, 1989Apr 24, 1990The C. W. Zumbiel Co.Carton with end wall display window
US5197656 *Sep 4, 1991Mar 30, 1993The C.W. Zumbiel Co.Sleeve style carton
US5249681 *Jan 13, 1992Oct 5, 1993The C. W. Zumbiel Co.Carton dispenser system
US5295623 *Jan 28, 1993Mar 22, 1994OtorMethod and a blank for making a box around a load, and a box obtained in this way
US5360113 *Nov 3, 1993Nov 1, 1994Riverwood International CorporationEnclosed sleeve-type carrier
US5395043 *Dec 23, 1993Mar 7, 1995OtorA blank for making a box around a load
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US9073661Jun 27, 2014Jul 7, 2015Rock-Tenn Shared Services, LlcPolygonal container and blank for making the same
US9096344Mar 4, 2013Aug 4, 2015The C.W. Zumbiel CompanyCarton with corner dispenser
US20090266874 *Nov 4, 2008Oct 29, 2009Smith Kenneth CPolygonal container and blank for making the same
EP1352846A1 *Mar 12, 2003Oct 15, 2003SCA Packaging Deutschland AG & Co. KG SCA-VerpackungswerkeWrapper of corrugated paperboard or the like for bottles or cans
WO1990014996A1 *Jun 15, 1989Dec 13, 1990C.W. Zumbiel Co.Carton with end wall display window
WO1995012527A1 *Aug 11, 1994May 11, 1995Riverwood International CorporationEnclosed sleeve-type carrier
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/427, 206/154
International ClassificationB65D71/00, B65D71/16, B65D71/06
Cooperative ClassificationB65D2571/00728, B65D2571/00141, B65D2571/00277, B65D71/16, B65D2571/0066
European ClassificationB65D71/16