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Publication numberUS2751880 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 26, 1956
Filing dateJan 22, 1953
Priority dateJan 22, 1953
Publication numberUS 2751880 A, US 2751880A, US-A-2751880, US2751880 A, US2751880A
InventorsAdam M Markowski
Original AssigneeAdam M Markowski
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Animated display aquariums
US 2751880 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 26. 1956 MARKOWSK] 2,751,880

ANIMATED DISPLAY AQUARIUMS Filed Jan. 22, 1953 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. ADAM M. MARKOMSK/ ATTO/P/YEK I J 26, 1955 A. M. MARKOWSK! 2,751,880

ANIMATED DISPLAY AQUARIUMS Filed Jan. 22, 1953 4 Sheets-Sheet2 87 INVENTOR.

f I 1 ADA/4 M MA/Pwms/r/ 25 I F 5 f5 39 BY June 26, 1956 A. M. MARKOWSKI 2,751,880

ANIMATED DISPLAY AQUARIUMS Filed Jan. 22, 1953 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR. ADAM M MAPAOWSK/ -14 TTOR/YEX J n 26, 1 A. M. MARKOWSKI 2,751,880

ANIMATED DISPLAY AQUARIUMS Filed Jan. 22, 1953 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 IN VEN TOR. ADAM m1 MAM 0W1? United States Patent ANIMATED DISPLAY AQU Adam M. Markowski, Philadelphia, Pa.

Application January 22, 1953, Serial No. 332,709

20 Claims. (Cl. 119-5) My invention relates to display devices, and it relates more particularly to displays of the action type as well as those involving miniature representations and live subjects.

One object of my invention is to provide a portable display which is relatively inexpensive to construct, of unique interest, and which will have universal appeal.

Another object of my invention is to provide a substantially unitary display device which is capable of being used in a variety or" manners, each with its own appeal, and which may be used in conjunction with auxiliary devices such for instance as a Christmas tree, to form a blending base therefor.

A further object of my invention is to provide a display device which combines growing or otherwise live subjects with mechanical construction and operation to form a unitary, eye-catching and attention-holding display.

Another object of my invention is to provide a display device adapted to hold live subjects, such for instance as fish, and which is so constructed as to encourage eye-appealing movement on the part of the fish while improving the health thereof.

Further objects of my invention will appear from the description which follows hereinafter.

For the purpose of illustrating my invention, I have shown in the accompanying drawings forms thereof which are at present preferred by me, since the same have been found in practice to give satisfactory and reliable results, although it is to be understood that the various instrumentalities of which my invention consists can be variously arranged and organized, and that my invention is not limited to the precise arrangements and organizations of the instrumentalities as herein shown and described.

Referring to the drawings in which like reference characters indicate like parts:

Figure 1 represents a perspective view of a display device embodying my invention.

Figure 2 represents a plan view of a display device embodying my invention.

Figure 3 represents a sectional view taken generally along the lines 33 of Figure 2.

Figure 4 represents an enlarged sectional view taken generally along the lines 44 of Figure 2.

Figure 5 represents an enlarged sectional view taken generally along the lines 55 of Figure 2.

Figure 6 represents an enlarged sectional view of a miniature representation of a path, taken generally along the lines 66 of Figure 2.

Figure 7 represents an enlarged fragmentary view of a portion of the channel, showing one form of water- Wheel and guard assembly, and embodying my invention.

Figure 8 represents an enlarged perspective view of a channel portion, showing a method of cleaning the water contained therein, which method is rendered possible by my invention.

Figure 9 represents a perspective view showing a modi- 2,751,880 Patented June 26, 1956 fication of my display device wherein a severed tree is supported thereby and plantings combined therewith in a unitary display. V

Figure 10 represents an enlarged fragmentary view of an anchor means on said display device .for securing a severed tree therewith. I

Figure 11 represents an enlarged, fragmentary sectional view illustrating a trunk-mounting means which may be utilized in the assembly illustrated in Figure 9.

Figure 12 represents a perspective view of a display device of modified construction, and embodying my invention.

Figure 13 represents an enlarged perspective view of the bracket, post, horizontal water-wheel and display mechanism assembly detail of a portion of the modification of my invention illustrated in Figure 12.

Figure 14 represents an enlarged, fragmentary elevational view of the assembly illustrated in Figure 13, and showing the same in relation to the propeller.

Figure 15 represents a further enlarged, vertical sectional view, taken generally along the lines 15-15 of Figure 14.

Figure 16 represents an enlarged sectional view taken generally along the lines 1616 in Figure 13. 7

According to my invention I preferably provide a tray 29 having side walls 21 and 22, end walls 23 and 24, and a bottom 25. A channel 26 is preferably mounted on said bottom 25, and is preferably substantially disposed within the confines of said side walls 21, 22, and end walls 23, 24. The channel 26 comprises an inner wall 27 and an outer wall 28 spaced therefrom. The inner wall 27 and outer wall 28 are preferably each continuous and extend upwardly from the vicinity of the bottom 25 to substantially the level of the upper rim 29 of the tray walls 21, 22, 23 and 24. The channel 26 may have its own bottom (not shown), or its bottom may consist of that portion of the bottom 25 which is disposed between the walls 27 and 28. In either event the walls and bottom of the channel 26 are preferably disposed in substantially watertight relation to the rest of the tray 21}. Because of its continuous nature, the wall 27 encloses a region which may hereinafter be referred to as the island region 30; and for purposes of comparison that portion of the tray which extends beyond the outer channel wall 28, may hereinafter be referred to as the land region 31.

A drainage system is preferably disposed beneath the bottom 25, and preferably comprises a plurality of drainage lines. Thus, a drainage line 32 extends beneath the bottom 25 and is in hydraulic communication with a drainage outlet 33 disposed along the bottom of one end portion of the land region 31, a drainage outlet 34 disposed along the bottom of the island region 30, and a drainage outlet 35 disposed along the bottom of another end portion of the land region 31. A suitable cock or drain valve 36 may be disposed at one end of the drainage line 32 to permit the drawing ofi of liquid which seeps into the line 32 from the outlets 33, 34 and 35. Another drainage line 37 is preferably disposedv along the bottom 25 and extends from a drain outlet 38 disposed along the bottom portion 39 of the channel26, to a suitable cock or other drainage valve 40 which is adapted to draw off the liquid contents of the channel 26.

A watertight jacket or tube 41 may be disposed in the land region 31 and opens at one end thereof into the channel 26. The other end thereof may open in the vicinity of a wall such as the end wall 24. The jacket 41 is preferably disposed in watertight relation to the interior of the land region 31, and extends through the outer channel wall 28 in preferably watertight relation thereto. A propeller shaft 42 is rotatably mounted within the tube 41 and preferably extends throughout the 'lengthof the tube 41 and beyond the inner and outer ends thereof. A propeller 43 is fixedly mounted on the propeller shaft 42 at the channel end thereof, and transmission means such for instance as the pulley 44 is preferably fixedly mounted onthe outer end of the propeller shaft 42. The propeller shaft -is preferably so disposed with relation to the channel 26, that the axis of rotation of the propeller 43 is inclined upwardly and in a manner to'intercept the channel wall at a horizontal acute angle therewith. Thus, rotationof the propeller 43 will draw Water therethrough, in an upwardly inclined direction, and in a manner to impel said water against a wall of the channel 26 operatively to cause said Water to be deflected by said wall. Suitable guard means such for instance as the cage 45 is disposed about the propeller 43 and the channel end of the propeller shaft 42, operably instance as the belt 47. Thus, when the motor 46 is actuated, and liquid such as water 48 is disposed within the channel 26, the propeller'43 'is rotatedrin a manner a to draw the 'water 48 through the cage 45 and upwardly against the channel wall 28. Thus, turbulent current is created which is guided upwardly and tangentially away from the wall 28 operably to cause surface turbulence 49 in the region of the water 48 adjacent that portion of the wall 28 which is in the path of the current 50 which leaves the propeller 43. It will be noted that this turbulence. is occasioned not merely by obstructions to the current '51 leading to the propeller occasioned by the disposal ofthe cage 45within the path of said current 51, but also by the disposition of portions of the cage 45 behind the propeller 43 and in the path of the current 50. The resultant highly turbulent surface 49 aspirates into the water 48 suificient quantity of air to keep the water 48 from becoming stagnant, and in fact to maintain it in constantly fresh condition while at the same time imparting a flow of current which is relatively coaxial with the axis of the continuous channel 26.

A conduit 52 may extend upwardly through one of 'the regions of the tray, and is illustrated in the figures as extending through the island region 30.

The conduit is preferably mounted on the tray to open at one end, on the exterior of the tray 20, and at its other end to open preferably intoa portion of the tray which is within the confines of its walls 21, 22, 23 and 24. Thus, the conduit 52 may open through the bottom 25, and may extend upwardly to substantially the level of the upper rim 29. The lower end 53 of the conduit 52 is preferably secured in watertight relation to the bottom 25. A hollow post '54 may be provided with an internal diameter substantially equal to the external diameter of the conduit52, and also may have substantially fixedly disposed therein and projecting downwardly therefrom, an anchor rod'55. The upper portion of the post 54 may have mounted thereon a suitable lighting system 56. Electric wires 57 may extend from the electric lighting system 56 downwardly through the hollow interior of the post 54 and through the conduit 52 to a suitable location beneath the bottom of the tray 20. The anchor 'rod 55is of such width with respect to the wires57, that it is disposable with said wires within the conduit752 in a manner to bear against the. interior of the conduit 52 a substantial distance beneath the upper edge thereof,

operably to maintain the post '54 in substantial co-alignare provided for mounting the tray with its bottom 25 disposed above the floor or platformtnot shown) on which the tray is to be placed, an auxiliary leg 63 may be disposed on the bottom 25 and beneath that portion thereof which is positioned immediately beneath the spike 59. Anchor members such as suitable hooks 64 may be secured to the corners where the side walls 21 and 22 respectively join the end walls23 and 24, and in the vicinity of the upper rim 29 thereof.

A rotatable ornamental float device 65 may be provided for disposal in the channel 26, and preferably comprises a buoyant body portion 66 having weights 67 carried by its bottom portion, laterally projecting arms 68 disposed about its outer periphery, and a suitable ornamental device such for instance as the miniature representation 69 of a musician may be disposed on the upward portion of the buoyant body 65.

A vertical water-wheel 76 may be provided within the channel 26 and preferably comprises suitable vanes 71 mounted on a horizontal pivot 72, which in turn is sup ported by a bracket 73 which is mounted on a suitable portion of the tray assembly. Thus, for instance, the bracket 73 is illustrated as being trifurcated with its tines extending downwardly and otfset with the center tine disposed substantially along a plane parallel to but spaced from the plane of the end tines. Thus the resultant bifurcated end 74 of the bracket 73 may be slipped over the upper edge of one of the channel walls 27, 28 with the pivot 72 extending over the channel 26. The bracket may thus come to rest in the vicinity of' the junction of the tines 75 of the bifurcated end 74, and be supported against tilting by the faces of the tines 75 thereof hearing against the wall on which the bracket 73 is mounted.

A suitable guard means such for instance as the wire rail 76 is preferably mounted on the same wall 27 or 28 'on which the Water-wheel 70 is disposed, and extends into the channel 26 and about the Water-wheel 70. The ends 77 of the guard rail 76 may be upwardly bent and then reversely bent at their termini sotas to grip the upper edge 78 of the wall on which the rail 76 is mounted, and to dispose the main body 79 of the rail below. said upper edge 78 a suflicient distance to place the main body 7 9 within the vicinity of the level 80 to which the water 48 is intendedto be carried within the channel 26. The

water-wheel, 70 is of such a width; that it may be em- 7 braced by the guard rail 76 within the channel 26 and still leave room between the-guard rail 76 and the opposing wall of the channel 26 for an ornamental float 65 to freely pass therebetween.

The island portion 30 and land portion 31 are preferably substantially filled with any desired soil-like'material 81 such for instance as sand, gravel, peat moss, humus, or n the like. Suitable vegetation 88 such for instance as moss, grass, small growing plants, flowers, cactus, or the like, may be planted in or on the soil-like material 81. If desired, miniature representations of larger objects may be disposed on the land and island regions. Thus, for

instance, a pebble path 82 may be laid about the land turbance of its component parts, the pebble path 32 may j be formed of a pliant base 85 which may be formed of a woven tape, plastic or the like, and miniature colored bits of glass, plastic, stone or the like 86 secured to the upper face of the base 85 by any suitable mean such as the adhesive 87. The pliant base 85 enables the path to be snugly laid on the uneven surface of the soil 81 and vegetation 88 in a manner to resist dislodgment therefrom, while the adhesive 87 holds the pebbles 86 against dislodgment with respect to the base 85.

In a preferred form of my invention live fish 89 are disposed in the water 48 and are preferably of a width substantially greater than that of the openings through the cage 45.

In Figures 12 to 16, inclusive, are illustrated modified constructions embodying my invention.

Thus, in Figure 12, there is illustrated parallel vertical water-wheels 95 and 96 disposed in the channel 26 in portions thereof wherein the flow of the current 94, while being continuous within the channel 26, is in opposite directions with respect to the side walls 21 and 22 of the tray 20. The vertical water-wheels 95 and 96 are preferably of similar construction and mounting, and may be constructed and mounted in the same manner as is described above for the water-wheel 70. In operation, the water-Wheels 95 and 96 will each be impelled into rotation, and maintained in constant rotation, by the current 94. While the water-wheels 95 and 96 will rotate in tandem so far as the current 94 is concerned, they will in fact rotate in opposite directions with respect to the land and island regions 31, 30, and the side walls 21 and 22 of the tray 20, thereby giving the illusion of a constant relation of equal but opposite motion, without the use of gears or similar drive mechanisms to elfect such motions.

Disposed in the same channel 26, in Figure 12, is illustrated a bracket and post assembly wherein motion is derived from the current 94 for operating a display device such as the aerial rotor 113 carrying suspension devices 98, while at the same time serving to draw the water 48 upwardly into a greater aeration surface 99.

This bracket and post assembly 100 comprises a bracket 101 mounted on a suitable mounting such for instance as the fork 102 secured to the upper edge of the wall 28 against which the turbulent current 50 is impinged by means of the propeller 43. An arm 103 extends preferably horizontally from the fork 102 and over the channel'26. In one preferred construction, the bracket 101 is formed of a continuous strip of sheet metal wherein one end 104 comprises the inner time of the fork 102, and extends upwardly a suitable distance above the fork 102,whereupon it is reversely bent as at 105 and extends downwardly toward the base region of the fork 102, whereupon it extends horizontally to form the arm 103,

.and then extends upwardly to form the stud 106, and then rearwardly to form the platform 107 resting on the reverse fold 105, whereupon it extends downwardly to form the outside tine of the fork 102. A suitable sheet metal collar 108 may embrace the portions of the sheet .metal strip extending between the outer edges of the arm 103 and platform 107 and above the fork 102. The arm '103 is disposed a substantial distance above the level 109 which is normally attained by the surface turbulence 49, but is preferably disposed not substantially higher than the upper rim 29 of the wall 28.

A suitable vertical post or shaft 110 is suitably jour- 1 means such as cords or wires 115. The suspension members 98 may each comprise a weight 116 mounted on the flexible member 115, and embraced by a suitable covering 117 which is carried thereby and which may be in the shape of any desired object or other ornament. The rotor 113-may be carried by a suitable column 118 through which the shaft 112 passes, and if desired the column 118 may be'fixedly secured to the shaft 112. The base 119 of the column may rest on a suitable step bearing such for instance as the washer 120. Rotation of the rotor 113 carries with it the weighted members 98, which in turn are swung outwardly by centrifugal force, thereby delineating a pattern of a transparent annulus through which the members 98 travel, the annulus being greater in diameter than the diameter formed by the outer edges of the blades 114.

In operation, the turbulent current 50 impelled by the rotation of the propeller 43 impinges against the submerged portion 121 of the post 110, and is guided upwardly therealong until it strikes the lower face 122 of the arm 103. In addition, the turbulent current 50 and the turbulent surface 49 upwardly impinge against the forward edge 123 of the inner tine 104 of the fork 102, and is guided upwardly therealong to said lower face 122. The water thus guided upwardly against the outer and inner regions of the lower face 122 of the arm 103 is drawn by capillary attraction until it completely covers said face 122 between the outer and inner regions thereof, thereby establishing a substantially vertical sheet 99 of flowing water which is being continuously fed by the turbulent current 50. Moreover, the horizontal waterwheel 111 serves to provide a brake or bafiles to resist the turbulent current 50 and further to guide it upwardly, thereby further feeding the vertical sheet of water 99. In this manner, the aeriation of the water 48 in the channel 26 is greatly enhanced, particularly since the primary flow is that which is engendered by the propeller 43 and is thus drawn into the turbulent stream 50 and upwardly toward the aeriating sheet 99. It will thus be seen that by the same novel construction, aeriation and attractive display motion are simultaneously achieved.

It will be obvious that my novel display device is capable of use in various manners, and affords attentiondrawing and eye-appealing effects whichever manner is chosen. Thus, in one of its simplest forms, the device may be used as a purely miniature landscape scene with vegetation growing on both the land and island regions, with the channel disposed therebetween, and miniature representations 83, 84 of objects normally associated with such a landscape disposed in appropriate places about the tray. By the addition of water 48, the scene becomes more realistic, and with the addition of fish 89 it becomes even more so. With the inclusion of the waterwheel 70, or the waterwheels 98, 96, or the aerial rotor 113, the scene becomes even more picturesque; and with the operation of the propeller 43, new and startling results are brought about. Although the waterwheels and rotor thereby become actuated, the effect on the Eve fish is even more pronounced. The stirring of a current produces an almost electric effect on them, and no matter what position they may hitherto have been in, they tend at once to swim about and then to align themselves with the direction of the current, by swimming actively against it. Indeed, the fish are forced to swim against the flow of water in order to remain still with respect to the channel. If they do not swim against the current, they are bodily carried with it. Thus, the fish are constantly giving a display of motion which is eye-appealing and attention-drawing. Whether they swim or not, movement is displayed in the water.

With the inclusion of the ornamental floats 65, new and startling eflects are added to combine with the motions already produced. Thus, the float 65 is carried by the current and in an upright condition through the channel 26. While it is moving longitudinally through the channel, momentum is engendered by its weight, and it is hurled against one of the sides 27, 28 as the channel 26 curves through its circuitous route in its closed circuit. As

'the float 65 is hurled tangentially against one of the side walls 27, 23 it strikes said wall with one of its lateral projections 68. In so doing, the projection 68 tends to be retained by said wall while the current carries the mental floats.

bodyportion 66 forward, thereby imparting a spin to 7 the body portion 66. The ornamental float 65 is then carried along with the current While it freely spins therein until it strikes another side wall 27, 28 of the channel 26, whereupon the spin is either re-activated in the same direction, or a spin in an opposite direction is imparted thereto, depending upon which wall of the channel is struck and the direction of the previous spin. Various and devious paths of movement of the ornamental float and sudden changes of spin are thus brought into play. I One such path is illustrated in Figure 2 by the broken line 90.

It will be noted that by the combination of elements in my invention, an interrelation of eye-appealing and attention-drawing movements has been established which is of particular interest to the onlooker. Thus, while his gaze is soothed by the restful miniature landscape with actual vegetation growing thereon, and the quiet, steady movementof the waterwheel turning in constant rhythm before his gaze, which constant rhythm may itself be rendered attention-compelling by the equal and opposite motion of the vertical waterwheels and the steady motion of the horizontal rotor, all bathed in the soft glow of the lighting 56, his attention is constantly being drawn from the restful background to the forever unpredictable movements of the fish which are stirred into alternative actions of swimming against thecurrent orbeing bodily carried with the current, and the interplay of their movements with the equally unpredictable and devious gyrations and paths of movement of the orna- Not only so, but the sharp variations of movement of the ornamental floats are accentuated as they come in contact with the guard rail 79 and are restricted in their passage through the channel 26 by the presence therein of the steadily moving waterwheel 70 and the resulting restrictions of the channel available to the spinning ornamental float 65. Not only so, but the fish 89 themselves must negotiate the passage beneath or about the waterwheel 78 when they are either carried by the current through that portion of the channel, or choose to swim therethrough. Should the continuous .study of the interplay of motions begin to tire the on- 1 locker, he need merely rest his gaze upon the steadily moving waterwheels and rotor, and the substantially static and scenic landscape. Thus, the beholder may find himself substantially entranced for very long periods of time, shifting his gaze from the quiet, restful scene to the dynamic and unpredictable movements taking place in the channel 26, with the substantially steady movement of the waterwheels and rotor tending to bridge the emotional efiect between the quiet of the landscape and the action within the channel.

Notionly does the propeller 43 serve to impart current ,tothe channel 26 and bring about an aspiration of air into the water 48, .but it also forms an integral part of a water-cleaning method which is available for use in the channel 26. Because of the use of said channel for holding water 48 within which is'contained live fish 89, waste matter'accumulates and must be cleaned from the channel. This may be done by the simple expedient of opening the cock 40 and draining the dirty Water from the channel and replacing it with fresh water. An even simpler method, however, and one which. can be achieved in a space of but seconds, while at the same time enabling the same water to be reused, is to lower into the channel a net 91' having sides 92 of substantially the samersize and configuration as the interior periphery of jthe channel 26. Indeed, the side edges 93 of the net 91 may be spaced a distancegreater than the distance between the side walls 27 and 28, and the net 91 may then be tilted about its vertical axis'until its side edges 93 bear against the side walls 27. and 28. When the propeller 43 is actuated, the current 94 will force the water .48 through the net until it has completed one circuit 7 through the channel 26. In the courseof that circuit,

the waste material carried by the water 48 will havebeen collected by the net 91, and the net may then be removed and: cleaned. Inasmuch as the fish 89 tend to swim against the current, in most cases they will .not be caught in the net-'91. Even if they do swim into contact with the net, however, they need not be removed with the net, for a simple backward movement of the net or a pivoting of thenet about its side edges 93 will free the fish89 therefrom. It will thus be seen that by the use of the propeller 43, the water 48 may be cleaned of waste matter in one complete circuit through'the channel 26, while the water itself becomes refreshened by the aspiration of air thereinto.

The growing vegetation 88 may be watered in any desired manner, as by sprinkling or otherwise, and periodically the cock 36 may be opened to drain off water which has seeped through the soil-like substance 81 and accumulated at the bottom of the tray. While fish are kept in the channel 26, the'propeller 43 may be actuated if desired at periodic intervals, thereby further varying the demands on the fish, and giving them a rest from the'movement experienced during the motion of the water. In effect, the stopping of the propeller 43 will befound to be similar to that of fish swimming from mid-stream to a quiet Thus, the display .device may be used indefinitely. Not only so, but its appearance may be varied considerably without departure V pool .along one side of a channel.

from its basic elements, by the substitution of other ornamentation or the mounting of a tree such for instance as a Christmas tree on the island or land regions, and by a mental attraction.

I am aware that the invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from the spirit or essential attributes thereof, and'I therefore desire the present embodiments to be considered in all respects as illustrative and not restrictive, reference being had to the appended claims rather than to the foregoing descriptio to indicate the scope of the invention.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In combination, an aquarium comprising a container in the form of a continuous channel; power operated current-producing means in said channel and adapted to imchannel and in a manner to aspirate air thereinto; said,

channel having a drainage system.

3. In combination, an aquarium comprising a container in the form of a continuous channel; power operated current-producing means in said channel and adapted to impel a flow of water substantially along the course of said channel and. in a manner to aspirate air thereinto;

a movable display device mounted on said aquarium; means for deriving motion from said flow of 'water and transmitting said motion to said display device.

4. In combination, an aquarium comprisinga container in the form of a continuous channel; power operated current-producing means in said channel and adapted to impel a flow of water substantially along the course of said channel and in a manner to aspirate air thereinto; a water-wheel mounted on said aquarium and having a substantially horizontal axis and blades disposed thereabout, the path of rotation of said blades intercepting the course of said channel. V V f 5. In combination, an aquarium comprising a container in the form of a continuous channel; power operated current-producing means in said channel and adapted to impel a flow of watersubstantially along the course of said channel and in a manner to aspirate air thereinto; a water-wheel mounted on said aquarium and having a substantially horizontal axis and blades disposed thereabout, the path of rotation of said blades intercepting the course of said channel; another water-wheel mounted on said aquarium and having a substantially horizontal axis and blades disposed thereabout, the path of rotation of said last-mentioned blades intercepting the course of said channel but being disposed in a portion of said channel wherein the direction of flow with respect to said aquarium is substantially opposite to the direction of flow at said portion of said channel where said first-mentioned waterwheel is disposed.

6. In combination, an aquarium comprising a container in the form of a continuous channel; power operated current-producing means in said channel and adapted to impel a flow of water substantially along the course of said channel and in a manner to aspirate air thereinto; a movable display device mounted on said aquarium; means for deriving motion from said flow of water and transmitting said motion to said display device; a water-wheel mounted on said aquarium and having a substantially horizontal axis and blades disposed thereabout, the path of rotation of said blades intercepting the course of said channel; another water-wheel mounted on said aquarium and having a substantially horizontal axis and blades disposed thereabout, the path of rotation of said lastmentioned blades intercepting the course of said channel but being disposed in a portion of said channel wherein the direction of flow with respect to said aquarium is substantially opposite to the direction of flow at said portion of said channel where said first-mentioned waterwheel is disposed.

7. In combination, an aquarium comprising a container in the form of a continuous channel; power operated current-producing means in said channel and adapted to impel a flow of water substantially along the course of said channel and in a manner to aspirate air thereinto; a float device having a vertical axis, peripheral projections disposed about said vertical axis, means to maintain said axis in a substantially vertical condition when said float is freely supported by its own buoyancy in said water.

8. In combination, an aquarium comprising a container in the form of a continuous channel; power operated current-producing means in said channel and adapted to impel a flow of water substantially along the course of said channel and in a manner to aspirate air thereinto; a movable display device mounted on said aquarium; means for deriving motion from said flow of water and transmitting said motion to said display device; a float device having a vertical axis, peripheral projections disposed about said vertical axis, means to maintain said axis in a substantially vertical condition when said float is freely supported by its own buoyancy in said water.

9. In combination, an aquarium comprising a container in the form of a continuous channel; power operated current-producing means in said channel and adapted to impel a flow of water substantially along the course of said channel and in a manner to aspirate air thereinto; a water-wheel mounted on said aquarium and having a substantially horizontal axis and blades disposed thereabout, the path of rotation of said blades intercepting the course of said channel; a float device having a vertical axis, peripheral projections disposed about said vertical axis, means to maintain said axis in a substantially vertical condition when said float is freely supported by its own buoyancy in said water.

10. In combination, an aquarium comprising a container in the form of a continuous channel; power perated current-producing means in said channel and adapted to impel a flow of water substantially along the course of said channel and in a manner to aspirate air thereinto; a moveable display device mounted on said aquarium; means for deriving motion from said flow of water and transmitting said motion to said display. device; a water-wheel mounted on said aquarium and having a substantially horizontal axis and blades disposed thereabout, the path of rotation of said blades intercepting the course of said channel; a float device having a vertical axis, peripheral projections disposed about said vertical axis, means to maintain said axis in a substantially vertical condition when said float is freely supported by its own buoyancy in said water.

11. In combination, an aquarium comprising a container in the form of a continuous channel; power operated current-producing means in said channel and adapted to impel a flow of water substantially along the course of said channel and in a manner to aspirate air thereinto; a water-wheel mounted on said aquarium and having a substantially horizontal axis and blades disposed thereabout, the path of rotation of said blades intercepting the course of said channel; another waterwheel mounted on said aquarium and having a substantially horizontal axis and blades disposed thereabout, the path of rotation of said last-mentioned blades intercepting the course of said channel, but being disposed in a portion of said channel wherein the direction of flow with respect to said aquarium is substantially opposite to the direction of flow at said portion of said channel where said first-mentioned water-wheel is disposed; a float device having a vertical axis, means to maintain said axis in a substantially vertical condition when said float is freely supported by its own buoyancy in said water. i

12. In combination, an aquarium comprising a container in the form of a continuous channel; power operated current-producing means in said channel and adapted to impel a flow of water substantially along the course of said channel and in a manner to aspirate air thereinto; a moveable display device mounted on said aquarium; means for deriving motion from said flow of water and transmitting said motion to said display device; a water-wheel mounted on said aquarium and having a substantially horizontal axis and blades disposed thereabout, the path of rotation of said blades intercepting the course of said channel; another water-wheel mounted on said aquarium and having a substantially horizontal axis and blades disposed thereabout, the path of rotation of said last-mentioned blades intercepting the course of said channel, but being disposed in a portion of said channel wherein the direction of flow with respect to said aquarium is substantially opposite to the direction of flow at said portion of said channel where said firstmentioned water-wheel is disposed; a float device having a vertical axis, peripheral projections disposed about said vertical axis, means to maintain said axis in a substantially vertical condition when said float is freely supported by its own buoyancy in said water.

13. In combination, an aquarium comprising a container in the form of a continuous channel; power opated current-producing means in said channel and adapted to impel a flow of water substantially along the course of said channel and in a manner to aspirate air thereinto; anchor means on said aquarium adapted to secure in substantially upright condition a tree-trunk whose base is severed.

14. In combination, an aquarium comprising a container in the form of a continuous channel; power operated current-producing means in said channel and adapted to impel a flow of water substantially along the course of said channel and in a manner to aspirate air thereinto; a conduit extending through said aquarium and adapted to carry electrical wiring from the exterior to a display portion carried by said aquarium.

' 15. In combination, an aquarium comprising a container in the form of a continuous channel; power operated current-producing means in said channel and adapted to impel a flow of water substantially along the "course ofsaid channel and in a manner to aspirate air 'thereinto; anchormeans -on said aquarium'adapted to seto impel a flow of water substantially along the course 'of said channel and in amanner to aspirate air there- 'into; a portion of said aquarium being adapted to hold a soil-like substance and vegetation; drainage means for said last-mentioned portion; anchor means on said aquarium adapted to secure in substantially upright condition 8. tree-trunk whose base is severed, and which base is disposed substantially in said soil-like substance.

17. In combination, an aquarium comprising a con- -tainer in the form of a continuous channel; power operated current-producing means in said channel and adapted to impel a flow of water substantially along the course of said channel and in a manner to aspirate air thereinto; a moveable display device mounted on said aquarium; means for deriving motion from said flow of water and transmitting said motion to said display device; anchor'means on said aquarium adapted to secure in substantially upright condition a tree-trunk whose base is severed.

18. In combination, an aquarium comprising a container. in the form of a continuous channel; power operated current-producing means in said channel and adapted to impela flow of water substantially along the course of said channel and in a manner to aspirate air thereinto; a water-Wheel mounted on said aquariumand having a substantially horizontal axis and blades disposed thereabout, the path of rotation of said blades intercepting the 7 course of said channel; anchor means on said aquarium adapted to secure in substantially upright condition a tree-trunk whose base is severed.

19. In combination, an aquarium comprising a container in the form of a continuous channel; power operated current-producing means in said channel and adapted to impel a flow 'of watersubstantially along the course of said'channel and in a manner to aspirate air thereinto; a float device having a vertical axis, peripheral projections disposed about said vertical axis, means to maintain said axis in a substantially vertical condition when said 'float is freely supported by its own buoyancy in said water; anchor means on'said aquarium adapted to secure in substantially upright conditiona tree-trunk whosebase is severed. 5

20. In combination, an aquarium comprising a con 'tainer in-the form of a continuous channelg power operated current-producing means in said channel and adapted to impel a flow of water substantially along the course of said-channel and in a manner to aspirate air thereinto;

a moveable display device mounted on said aquarium; means for deriving motion from said flow of water and transmitting said motion to said display device; a waterwheel mounted on said aquarium and having a substantially horizontal axis and blades disposed thereabout, the path of rotation of said blades intercepting the course of said channel; another water-wheel mounted on said aquarium and having a substantially horizontal axis and blades disposed thereabout, the path of rotationof said last-mentioned blades intercepting the course of said' channel, but being disposed in a portion of said channel wherein the direction of flow with respect to said aquarium is substantially opposite to the direction. of flow at said portion of said channel where said first-mentioned water-wheel is disposed; a float device having a vertical axis, peripheral projections disposed about said vertical axis, means to maintain said axis in a substantially'ver- 'tical condition when said float is freely supported by its References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Rueppel Oct. 7, 1924 D.- 110,651 Smith July 26, 1938 739,236 Thompson Sept. 15, 1903 1,508,318 Hagenbeck et a1. Sept. 9, 1924 1,587,295 Gammeter June 1,1926

1,627,517 Littleford May 3, 1927 2,117,616 Levenstein May 17, 1938 2,272,582 Poppe Feb. 10, 1942 FOREIGN PATENTS 478,500 Germany June 25, 1929

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3326185 *Jan 19, 1966Jun 20, 1967Perez Aurelio GarciaAquarium light with aerator
US3542934 *Mar 6, 1968Nov 24, 1970Us NavySubmarine simulator
US3691995 *Apr 13, 1970Sep 19, 1972Little Glen MelvonSwimming pool for horses
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US4245400 *Oct 17, 1978Jan 20, 1981Johnson Burton RThree dimensional educational toy model subdivision
US4353699 *Jun 16, 1980Oct 12, 1982Johnson Burton RThree dimensional educational toy model subdivision
US4413436 *Jun 1, 1982Nov 8, 1983Ward Michael LAquarium with simulated stream flow
US4691459 *Feb 3, 1986Sep 8, 1987George ButlerArtificial aquarium
US4754571 *Sep 12, 1986Jul 5, 1988Wolfgang RiechmannTerrarium/aquarium combination
US5775260 *Jan 14, 1997Jul 7, 1998Jansen; JohnAquarium extension
US5782204 *Apr 3, 1997Jul 21, 1998Tidaltronics Inc.Wavemaker for living aquariums
US6397780 *Jun 21, 2000Jun 4, 2002James Scott YoungstromUnderwater apparatus for an aquarium and related methods
US6951187 *Jun 24, 2004Oct 4, 2005Mckoy Steven PAnimal feeding station
US20120103272 *Oct 26, 2011May 3, 2012Nicholas Joseph GramzaMicrocosm terrestrial and aquatic landscape habitat: A freestanding "miniature mountain" chain, topiary, upper pool, waterfall and pond-aquarium hybrid habitat with natural curves
US20130255584 *Dec 4, 2011Oct 3, 2013John M. LipscombWater Wheel Aerator Assembly For Pet Fountain
Classifications
U.S. Classification119/246, 119/247, D11/155, 119/253, D11/144
International ClassificationG09F19/12, A01K63/00
Cooperative ClassificationG09F19/12, A01K63/003
European ClassificationG09F19/12, A01K63/00A