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Publication numberUS2753156 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 3, 1956
Filing dateFeb 17, 1954
Priority dateMar 23, 1953
Also published asDE1012319B
Publication numberUS 2753156 A, US 2753156A, US-A-2753156, US2753156 A, US2753156A
InventorsRieger Hans
Original AssigneeRieger Hans
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Portable snow fence
US 2753156 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Mhz 3., 1956 H. RlEGER PORTABLE sNow FENCE Filed Feb. 17, 1954 waff/vra@ Hms Rpt-:GER:

PURTABLE SNW vFENClE Hans Rieger, Munich, Germany Application February 17, 1954, Serial Nrn-410,981

Claims priority, application Germany March 23, 1953 l2 Claims. (Cl. ZEG-125) This invention relates to fences, and more particularly to fences adapted to prevent the formation of snowdrifts, commonly referred to as snow fences.

in the past fences serving this function have been adapted; these fences however have either been constructed completely of wood resulting in a bulky cumbersome structure requiring continuous care and maintenance or have been constructed of wood pickets laced together lby baling wire. They have been constructed for example of wood boards criss-crossed over each other with an occasional stake driven into the ground. These fences have been built on the spot where required and complete demolition occurs when taking the fences down after use for the winter. In more recent years in an attempt to avoid the diiculties involved in building a fence on the spot these fences have been made of wood pickets connected together by baling wire. The result obviously is a rather flimsy, structurally weak construc non.

In the relatively rigid board fence of past years rotting becomes a great problem both at the point where the boards enter the ground due to the wetting `effect of the earth on the wood and at the point where the boards are nailed together due `to the collection of moisture at the nail joint. Difculty is also encountered since the boards tend to become brittle under cold weather conditions whereby the wind loads during snowstorms cause considerable damage. The baling wire-wood picket construction is also subject to the above-mentioned diie culties.

in an attempt to overcome these difficulties the present construction has been evolved whereby conventional wire fencing may be employed permitting the use of galvanized weatherproof wiring. Clearly the use of such wire mesh fences would itself be .inadequate in preventing the passage of snow. It is for this reason that exible slats are interlaced between the apertures of the wire mesh thus forming a bulwark against the passage of the snow. Spaces between the slats permit the wind to pass through thus diminishing the wind load to be snpported by the fence. The fence is maintained in position by means of periodically provided stakes or poles, thus keeping to a minimum the contactbetween fence element and earth and thereby diminishing the rotting effect of the moist ground on the fence.

lt is accordingly a primary object of this invention to provide a fence and a method of building same which can keep back the snow so as `to prevent snow drifts.

lt is a secondary object of this invention to provide such a fence which is readily portable whereby it may readily be taken down after a winters use and replaced at the beginning of the next winter season.

A further object of this invention is to provide a snow fence which can economically `be constructed of the sturdiest fence material available.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a fence in which earth to fence contact is kept at a minimum thereby minimizing any rotting.

CII

Another object of this invention is to provide a fence which may readily flex under wind load without breakmg.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a fence in which the elements are readily replaceable with a minimum of effort when repair is needed.

With the above objects in view the present invention mainly consists of provision of an intermeshed wire fence supported on posts adapted to be inserted into the ground spaced at lengths therealong and fastened thereto. Between these posts and interlaced in the mesh fance are provided snow retaining elements or slats.

The novel features which are considered as characteristic for the invention are set forth in particular in the appended claims. The invention itself, however, both as to its construction and its method of operation, together with additional objects and advantages thereof, will be best understood from the following description of specific embodiments when read in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. l is a view of a length of the fence showing one species of the invention;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged View showing a section of the fence with another embodiment of the stake arrangement and employing a different species of wire mesh;

Fig. 3 is a detail, drawn to a reduced scale, of the embodiment shown in Fig. 2; and

Fig. 4 is a cross-section taken on the line 4--4 of Fig. 3 through a slat shown in Fig. 3.

`Referring more particularly to the embodiment of the disclosure shown in Fig. l, it is seen that posts or stakes il are provided having pointed ends 2 so as to permit ready insertability into the ground. Supported on the stakes i is a length of wire fencing 3 of the mesh variety. The particular mesh employed in the embodiment disclosed in Fig. l is of the type wherein the strands making up the mesh of the fence cross each other. Clearly the particular type of fence employed may be varied so long as a mesh structure results. Between the posts or stakes 1 at spaced intervals along the length of fence 3 snow resisting elements or slats l are woven into the mesh. The particular orientation of the slats may be varied from a position at right angles to the ground to one parallel to the ground. ln the preferred embodiment the most desirable arrangement has been illustrated, namely: a positioning of the slats at right angles to the ground. lt is to be noted that the preferred construction has `a slat spacing wherein the slats, which are of a width equal to half that of the mesh, are arranged at least half a mesh width apart. The slats are preferably fastened to the wire fencing. ln the preferred ernbodiment this fastening is disclosed as taking place by means of a strand of wire 5 extending through hole 6 at an upper portion of the slat fastened to upper wire '7 of the fence. lt is illustrated as connected at the upper portion of the Slat, since when construction takes place at the fence site it eliminates the need for the workmen to stoop excessively, but may either be woven into the fence without fastening, or tied at any other convenient point.

The posts or stakes i are preferably made up of a light tubular metal. it should be obvious however, that though a preferred construction would employ a light tubular non-rustable material, stakes of :any other variety may also be utilized.

In the embodiment of Fig. 2 it is Ito be noted that the fence is provided of a sectionalized structure whereby separate units may be maintained. Note the stakes at the right of Fig. 2 indicating how two fence units may be joined. The disclosure of Fig. 2 also indicates the obviously permissible use of a different variety of wire meshing whereby the `strands of the mesh interlace and go back upon themselves. This mesh construction is most clearly indicated in Fig. 3.

The slats 4 may be formed of any light exible material. Light non-ferrous metal strips or plastic or wood may be employed whichever is found most economically feasible.

It will be understood that each of the elements de scribed above, or two or more together, may also nd a useful application in other types of snow fences differing from the types described above.

While the invention has been illustrated and described as embodied in snow fences, it is not intended to be limited to the details shown, since various modifications and structural changes may be made without departing in any way from the spirit of the present invention.

Without further analysis, Athe foregoing will so fully reveal the gist of the present invention that others can by applying current knowledge readily adapt it for various applications without omitting features that, from the standpoint of prior art, fairly constitute essential characteristics of the generic or specific aspects of this invention and, therefore, such adaptations should and are intended to be comprchended within the meaning and range of equivalence of the following claims.

What is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

l. In a fence adapted to be rolled up, in combination, a wire network formed by two groups of wire portions, the wire portion of each group being substantially parallel to each other and being inclined to the wire portions of the other group to form quadrangular wire meshes in said ne-twork; and a plurality of substantially parallel spaced slats each having opposite longitudinal edge portions and opposi-te faces extending between sa-id edge portions, said slats being interwoven between and held by said two groups of wire portions, the wire portions of each group passing across one of said faces of said slats, and passing under the wire portions of the other group at one of said longitudinal edge portions of each slat and over the wire portions of said other group at the other'longitudinal edge portion of each slat.

2. ln a fence adapted to be rolled up, in combination, a wire network formed by two groups of wire portions, the wire portion of each group being substantially parallel `to each other and being inclined to the wire portion-s of the other group to form substantially equal quadrangular wire meshes in said network; and a plurality of substantially parallel spaced slats each having opposite longitudinal edge portions and opposite faces extend ing between said edge portions, said slats being interwoven between and held by said :two groups of wire portions, the wire portions of each group passing across one of said faces of said slats, and passing under the wire portions of the other group at one of said longitudinal edge portions of each slat and over the wire portions of said other group at the other longitudinal edge por* tion of each slat, said slats being substantially in the plane of said wire network when the latter is in a plane and said slats being substantially normal to a diagonal of said meshes and having a width smaller than half of said diagonal and being spaced from each other a distance larger than their width.

3. In a fence adapted to be rolled up, `in combination, a pair of spaced substantially parallel wires; a wire network forrned by two groups of wire portions, the wire portion of each group being substantially parallel to each other and being inclined to the wire portions of the other group to form quadrangular wire `meshes in said network extending between said pair of parallel wires and said parallel wires interlaced with the wire meshes adjacent thereto; and a plurality of substantially parallel spaced slats each having opposite longitudinal edge portions and opposite faces extending between said edge portions, said slats being interwoven between and held by said two groups of wire portions, the wire portions of each group passing across one of said faces of said slats, and passing under Ithe wire portions of 4the other group at one of said longitudinal edge portions of each .slat and over the wire portions of said other group at the other longitudinal edge portion of each slet.

4. In a fence adapted to be rolled up, in combina-tion, a pair of spaced substantially parallel wires; a wire network formed by two groups of wire portions, the wire portion of each group being substantially parallel to each other and being inclined to `the wire portions of the other group to form substantially equal quadrangular wire meshes in said network extending between said pair of parallel wires and said parallel wires interlaced with the wire meshes adjacent thereto; and a plurality of substan tially parallel spaced slats each having opposite longitudinal edge portions and opposite faces extending between said edge portions, said slats being interwoven between and held by said two groups of wire portions, the wire portions of each group passing across one of said faces of said slats, and passing under the wire portions of the other group at one of said longitudinal edge portions of each `sla-t and over the wire portions of said `other group at the other longitudinal edge portion of each slat, said slats being substantially 4in the plane of said wire network when the latter is in a plane and said slats being substantially normal to -a diagonal of said meshes and having a width smaller than half of said diagonal and being spaced .from each other a distance :larger :than their width.

5. In a fence adapted to be rolled up, in combination, a pair of spaced substantially parallel wires; a wire network formed by two groups of wire portions, the wire portion of each group being substantially parallel lto each other Aand being inclined to the wire portions of the other group to form substantially equal quadrangular wire meshes in said network extending between `said pair of parallel wires and said parallel wires interlaced with the wire meshes adjacent thereto; a plurality of substantially parallel spaced .slats each having opposite longitudinal edge portions and opposite faces extending between said edge portions, said slats being interwoven between and held by said two group's of wire portions, `the wire portions of each group passing across one of said faces of said sla'ts, and passing under the wire portions of the other group at one of said longitudinal edge portions of each sla-t and over the wire portions of said other group at the other longitudinal edge portion of each slat, said slats being substantially in the plane of said wire network when the latter is in a plane and said slats being substantially normal to a diagonal of said meshes and having a width smaller than half of said diagonal and being spaced from each other a distance larger than their width and having adjacent at one of their ends an opening passing therethrough; and fastening means going through said opening for fastening said slats to one of said parallel wires.

6. A fence comprising, in combination, a pair of spaced supporting posts; a pair of spaced substantially parallel wires respectively fastened to and extending between said posts in a direction substantially normal thereto; a wire network extending between said posts and said pair of parallel wires, said wire network being formed by only two endless wires interlaced with each other and said parallel wires and forming quadrangular wire meshes between said parallel wires, and said two endless wires forming a plurality of loops wound about said posts, respectively, and intermeshed with the quadrangular wire meshes adjacent to said posts to fasten said meshes to said posts; and a plurality of spaced slats interwoven between said wire meshes substantially parallel to said posts.

7. A fence comprising, in combination, a pair of spaced supporting posts; a pair of spaced substantially parallel wires respectively fastened to and extending between said posts in a direction substantially normal thereto; a wire network extending between said posts and said pair of parallel wires, said wire network being formed by only two endless wires interlaced with each other and said parallel wires and forming substantially equal quadrangular wire meshes between said parallel wires, and said two endless wires forming a plurality of loops wound about said posts, respectively, and intermeshed with the quadrangular wire meshes adjacent to said posts to fasten said meshes to said posts; and a plurality of spaced slats interwoven between said wire meshes substantially parallel to said posts, said slats having a width smaller than half of a diagonal of said wire meshes and being spaced from each other a distance larger than their width.

8. A fence comprising, in combination, a pair of spaced supporting posts; a pair of spaced substantially parallel wires respectively fastened to and extending between said posts in a direction substantially normal thereto; a wire network extending between said posts and said pair of parallel wires, said wire network being formed by only two endless wires interlaced with each other and said parallel wires and forming substantially equal quadrangular wire meshes between said parallel wires, and said two endless wires forming a plurality of loops wound about said posts, respectively, and intermeshed with the quadrangular wire meshes adjacent to said posts to fasten said meshes to said posts; a plurality of spaced slats interwoven between said wire meshes substantially parallel to said posts, said slats having a width smaller than half of a diagonal of said wire meshes and being spaced from each other a distance larger than their width and having adjacent at one of their ends an opening passing there through; and fastening means going through said opening for fastening said slats to one of said parallel wires.

9. A removable snow fence comprising, in combination, a plurality of adjacent fence sections adapted to be rolled up, each of said fence sections comprising a pair of end posts; a wire network extending between said end posts and fastened to the same, said wire network being formed by a plurality of intermeshed wires forming substantially equal and substantially quadrangular wire meshes connected at the intersection points thereof for relative movement to each other; and a plurality of spaced flexible slats interwoven in and held by said wire meshes, said slats being substantially in the plane of said network when the latter is in a plane and being substantially normal to a diagonal of said meshes and substantially parallel to said posts, said slats having a width smaller than half of said diagonal and being spaced from each other a distance larger than their width,

l0. A removable snow fence comprising, in combination, a plurality of adjacent fence sections adapted to be rolled up, each of said fence sections comprising a pair of end posts; a wire network extending between said end posts, said wire network being formed by a plurality of intermeshed wires forming substantially equal and substantially quadrangular wire meshes connected at the intersection points thereof for relative movement to each other; a pair of wire spirals respectively wound about said end posts and interconnected with the wire meshes adjacent to said posts for fastening said network to said end posts; and a plurality of spaced flexible slats interwoven in and held by said Wire meshes, said slats being substantially in the plane of said network when the latter is in a plane and being substantially normal to a diagonal of said meshes and substantially parallel to said posts, said slats having a width smaller than half of said diagonal and being spaced from each other a distance larger than their width.

1l. A removable snow fence comprising, in combination, a plurality of adjacent fence sections adapted to be rolled up, each of said fence sections comprising a pair of end posts; a pair of spaced substantially parallel wires fastened to and extending between said end posts; a wire network extending between said end posts and said pair of substantially parallel wires, said network fastened to said end posts and interconnected to said parallel wires, said wire network being formed by a plurality of inter meshed wires forming substantially equal and substan tially quadrangular wire meshes connected at the intersection points thereof for relative movement to each other; a plurality of spaced flexible slats interwoven in and held by said wire meshes, said slats being substantially in the plane of said network when the latter is in a plane and being substantially normal to a diagonal of said meshes and substantially parallel to said posts, said slats having a width smaller than half of said diagonal and being spaced from each other a distance larger than their width and having adjacent at one of the ends thereof an opening passing therethrough; and fastening means going through said opening for fastening said slats to one of said pair of parallel wires.

1.. A removable snow fence comprising, in combination, a plurality of adjacent fence sections adapted to be rolled up, each of said fence sections comprising a pair of end posts; a wire network extending between said end posts and fastened to the same, said wire network being formed by a plurality of intermeshed wires forming substantially equal and substantially quadrangular wire meshes connected at the intersection points thereof for relative movement to each other; a plurality of spaced exible slats interwoven in and held by said re meshes, said slats being substantially in the plane of said network when the latter is in a plane and being substantially normal to a diagonal of said meshes and substantially parallel to said posts, said slats having a width smaller than half of said diagonal and being spaced from each other a distance larger than their Width; and a plurality of wire loops respectively wound about the top ends of adjacent end posts to connect adjacent fence sections to each other.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,058,274 Tirapani Apr. 8, 1913 1,655,318 Koksma Ian. 3, 1928 1,987,312 Ruppel Ian. 8, 1935 2,161,450 Bohland s June 6, 1939 2,260,948 Loftus Oct. 28, 1941 FOREIGN PATENTS 110,362 Sweden Apr. 18, 1944

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1058274 *Feb 10, 1911Apr 8, 1913Alfredo Carlo TirapaniRevetment for protecting embankments and banks of streams and the like.
US1655318 *Aug 27, 1927Jan 3, 1928Anton J WandtSnow fence
US1987312 *Jul 22, 1932Jan 8, 1935Ruppel Frederick HFence structure and method of making the same
US2161450 *Dec 8, 1937Jun 6, 1939Bohland Carl PSnow fence
US2260948 *Jan 13, 1940Oct 28, 1941Webster Loftus DanielSnow fence
SE110362A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2827729 *Sep 29, 1955Mar 25, 1958John V HoenePortable duck blinds
US3345040 *Aug 26, 1965Oct 3, 1967Rivelli Joseph AChain link fencing
US3572640 *Aug 11, 1969Mar 30, 1971Alcan Aluminum CorpFence lattice and retaining means therefor
US3712590 *Jul 28, 1971Jan 23, 1973Manner Plastic Materials IncSlats for a chain link fence
US3913889 *Oct 11, 1973Oct 21, 1975West Chester Chem CoSnow fence
US4339114 *Mar 17, 1980Jul 13, 1982Foresight Industries, Inc.Fencing system
US4860997 *Mar 18, 1988Aug 29, 1989Pacific Fence And Wire CompanySlat fence with retainer wire construction
US4872647 *Sep 29, 1987Oct 10, 1989Paradise Francis MDecorative attachment for a chain link fence
US5029819 *Dec 18, 1987Jul 9, 1991Kane Phillip JHandling and supporting flexible material of a fence
US6581914 *May 4, 2001Jun 24, 2003Juan Jose Saura SotillosModular fence
US7082716 *May 4, 2004Aug 1, 2006Darrell Keith DowneyRollable watering tube
US20130042544 *Jan 27, 2011Feb 21, 2013Gordon SabineBird control system
WO2010133713A2 *Oct 20, 2009Nov 25, 2010Malla Talud Cantabria, S.L.Barrier for deposition of particles
Classifications
U.S. Classification256/12.5, 256/34
International ClassificationE04H17/06, E01F7/02, E04H17/02, E01F7/00
Cooperative ClassificationE01F7/02, E04H17/066
European ClassificationE04H17/06B, E01F7/02