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Publication numberUS2754835 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 17, 1956
Filing dateOct 23, 1953
Priority dateOct 23, 1953
Publication numberUS 2754835 A, US 2754835A, US-A-2754835, US2754835 A, US2754835A
InventorsCasady Philip M
Original AssigneeMedical Equipment Lab
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for cleaning hollow tubular elements
US 2754835 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jul 17, 1956 P. M. CASADY 2,754,835

APPARATUS FOR CLEANING HOLLOW TUBULAR ELEMENTS Filed Oct. 23. 1953 2 Sheets-Shet l INVENTOR.

| Q PH/L/P M. CASADY, I

BY a

97 14 Trap/v5)- July 17, 1956 P. M. CASADY APPARATUS FOR CLEANING HOLLOW TUBULAR ELEMENTS 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Oct. 25, 1953 INVENTOR. CAsAoy, I

PHIL/P M ATT ENEX United States Patent APPARATUS FOR CLEANING HOLLOW TUBULAR ELEMENTS Philip M. Casady, Los Angeles, Calif., assignor to Medical Equipment Laboratories, Los Angeles, Calif., a corporation of California Application October 23, 1953, Serial No. 387,999 Claims. (Cl. 134-112 This invention relates to an apparatus for cleaning a plurality of hollow tubular elements each having at least one open end and more particularly to means for thoroughly cleaning and washing internal and external surfaces of syringes and the external surfaces of their associated plungers.

In treatment of patients in a hospitala great number of syringes are employed each day. Preferably, each syringe and plunger therefor should be cleaned after each use and before sterilization in order to prevent contamination of a solution being administered to a patient by a different solution previously contained with the hollow syringe. Some solutions used in the syringes tend to cling tightly to the internal surfaces of the syringes and are not readily removed therefrom. In some instances, certain syringes are not cleaned the same day in which they are used. The problem therefore of maintaining a suflicient number of clean syringes on hand and of effectively and thoroughly cleaning each syringe in order to prevent contamination is a serious one and one which heretofore has presented many difiiculties andhas consumed considerable time.

Present methods employed in hospitals for cleaning syringes and the associated plungers therefor include individually cleaning each. syringe and plunger by washing the syringe and plunger in a suitable cleaning or washing fluid such as a detergent. Sometimes the surfaces of an individual syringe may be scrubbed by suitable brush means. In some instances used syringes are allowed to accumulate and are then cleaned by soaking a batch of syringes in a suitable container in which suitable cleaning fluid is carried. The syringes in the container are usually not individually cleaned by may be slightly agitated within the container while in soaking position to attempt to remove solutions clinging to the internal surfaces thereof. After such a batch of syringes have been allowed to soak for a predetermined time the cleaning fluid is drawn OE and the batch of syringes may be rinsed in a suitable rinsing fluid. Obviously this latter method of cleaning syringes does not effectively and thoroughly clean internal surfaces of the syringes.

Obviously the manual efforts at cleaning a large number of syringes were ineflicient and as a result several prior syringe cleaning machines have been proposed for cleaning and washing a plurality of syringes at the same time. One of such prior proposed machines has included mounting the syringes on the periphery of a wheel and then rotating the wheel so that the lower portion of the wheel is dipped into a detergent solution and syringes carried thereby are immersed into the detergent. When a syringe reaches the top of the wheel,'it is so positioned that detergent is drained therefrom. Thus alternating dipping and draining of syringes is eflected. A different prior proposed syringe cleaning machine has included mounting syringes With their open ends downwardly facing and submerging the syringes into a solution 'of detergent. Means are provided whereby anair stream is bubbled upwardly into the detergent in each syringe, thereby causing slight agitation of the detergent therein. It will be obvious that such prior proposed machines did not effectively and efliciently clean and wash the internal surfaces of the syringe because of insufficient agitation of the cleaning fluid so as to effect a thorough washing of the surface.

The present invention contemplates a novel. apparatus for thoroughly and completely cleaning a large number of syringes in a short period of time such as from three to live minutes, depending upon the condition of the syringes. The apparatus of the present invention contemplates forcibly injecting a jet stream of Washing fluid into each syringe in such a manner that the fluid introduced thereinto subjects the internal surfaces of each syringe to a thorough flushing action.

In other words, the present invention contemplates ramming a large volume of washing fluid into a syringe and at a high velocity so that a vigorous, extremely turbulent, hard washing action is eflfected on the internal sur faces of the syringe. The present invention contemplates that this hard washing action be performed in an intermittent sequential manner so that each syringe is subjected to a cycle of washing and draining by the forcibly injected fluid and then draining said fluid therefrom. The apparatus of the present invention contemplates the handling of syringes or hollow tubular elements of different sizes and in the exemplary embodiment is capable of handling up to approximately syringes at one time.

The primary object of this invention therefore is to disclose and provide a novel apparatus for effectively cleaning and washing a plurality of hollow tubular elements having an open end, such as syringes, in a minimum of time.

An object of this invention is to disclose and provide an apparatus for cleaning a plurality of open ended syringes wherein the internal surfaces thereof are subjected to relatively rapid washing and draining cycles which include vigorously flushing the internal surfaces thereof and draining the washing fluid therefrom.

' Another object of this inventionis to disclose and provide an apparatus for washing hollow tubular elements wherein the internal surface of each element is subjected to a forceful, vigorous, turbulent action of a washing fluid.

A different object of this invention is todisclose and provide an apparatus as above mentioned wherein open ended hollow tubular elements or syringes of different sizes may be cleaned.

The invention contemplates an apparatus for cleaning a plurality of syringes wherein the Washing fluid employed therein is recirculated and wherein the Washing cycle may be semi-automatically or automatically con trolled in operation.

A further object of the invention is to disclose an apparatus as above described wherein the fluid employed for washing is also used for rotating the means for ejecting the fluid into. each of said elements.

A still further object of this invention is to disclose and provide an apparatus for cleaning a plurality of syringes which is simply constructed, easy to manufacture and which effectively and thoroughly cleans each individual syringe.

Generally speaking, this invention contemplates such an apparatus as above mentioned wherein an enclosure is provided for supporting therein a plurality of vertically stacked annular racks arranged about a common axis and adapted to carry a plurality of syringes in radially, inwardly facing relation. Rotatable means is mounted virtually coaxial with said common axis and carries a plurality of longitudinally spaced nozzles, the axis of each nozzle being aligned with the. axis of each tubular nozzle is rotated. The apparatus includes means for supplying a washing fluid to said nozzles whereby a forceful jet stream of water is 'ejected therefrom and which sequentially enters into the open end of the opposed associated syringes as the nozzles are rotated. The inclination of the syringes causes rapid draining of the fluid injected thereinto so that each syringe is capable of receiving additional fluid from the nozzle as it repeatedly rotates past each element.

Other objects and advantages of this invention will be readily apparent from the following description of the drawings in which an exemplary embodiment of this invention is shown.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a sectional view of an apparatus embodying this invention, the section being taken substantially in a vertical plane bisecting the apparatus.

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary sectional view taken in the planes indicated by line II-II of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary sectional view of a multiported valve means employed with'the apparatus shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view of the means for ejecting fluid into said syringes.

Fig. 5 is a sectional view taken in the transverse plane indicated by line VV of Fig. 4.

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary view taken from the plane indicated by line Vi-VI of Fig. 1.

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary perspective view of a modification of the rotatable means and mounting means therefor.

Fig. 8 is a perspective view of a fragmentary portion of a modified rack for holding the syringes.

An apparatus embodying this invention is generally indicated at 10 and may generally comprise an enclosure 11, a plurality of annular rack means indicated at 12 supported within the enclosure and of generally annular form for carrying in a circular arrangement a plurality of radially arranged hollow tubular elements or syringes 13. A means for intermittently ejecting a jet stream of fluid sequentially into each syringe is generally indicated at 14 and may comprise nozzles having their axes aligned with the axes of opposed syringes during rotation. Beneath the enclosure 11 may be provided a means 15 for supplying washing fluid to the rotatable means 14.

The enclosure 11 may comprise a cylindrical side wall 17 made of any suitable sheet material and preferably non-corrosive and stainless. The side wall 17 may be provided with a transparent window 18 mounted in an opening in said side wall by any suitable means such as a grommet 19. A slightly dished concave bottom wall 26 may extend across the bottom of the side wall 17, said bottom wall being provided with a central opening 21 having an annular screen 22 extending thereacross for permitting drainage of fluid from the enclosure into the means 15. The bottom wall is preferably made of the same material as side wall 17.

A cover 23 may extend across and cover the top end of the cylindrical side wall 17, said cover having an enlarged central opening at 24 for ventilating the enclosure 11. A baflie plate 25 of transparent material may be carried by the cover 23 as by a screw and spacer block assembly 26 in spaced relation to the opening 24 for preventing splashing or discharge of fluid from the enclosure through the opening 24. At the same time the transparent baffle 25 permits observation of the interior of the enclosure 11.

Beneath enclosure 11 may be provided a cylindrical housing 28 of generally cylindrical form and of slightly smaller diameter than the side walls 17. The housing 28 includes a bottom wall 29 which may be supported from any suitable supporting surface by means of a plurality of spaced shoes 30. The top margins of the housing 23 may be turned radially outwardly to provide a circumferential flange 31 arranged to support the bottom wall 2% of the enclosure at its circumferential margins.

Supported within the enclosure 11 by the bottom wall 20 thereof may be the rack means 12 which comprises a plurality of vertically stacked annular racks 33, said racks 33 being coaxially arranged about a common axis defined by the rotatable means 14. Each rack means 33 may be formed in any suitable manner from wire stock of noncorrosive stainless material. Each rack means 33 may include a pair of concentric rings 34 and 35 joined together by a plurality of spaced radially extending wire elements 36, some of which may extend beyond the outer ring 35 and are bent upwardly to provide a vertical portion 37 adapted to abut against the interior surface of the side wall 17 for coaxially positioning the rack with the means 14. The vertical portions 37 are integrally joined with an inturned horizontal leg 38 which is adapted to provide a support for a rack to be positioned thereabove. The bottom rack 33 in addition to the structure already described, may include circumferentially spaced depending leg means 39 which rest upon the circumferential margin of the bottom wall 20 for spacing the bottom rack a selected distance above the bottom wall 20.

Each rack means 33 may be provided with upstanding pairs of upwardly facing resilient wire clips 40, each pair of clips 40 being radially aligned with respect to the axis of the rotatable means 14, clips of each pair being carried respectively by the rings 34 and 35. The wire clips 40 may be secured to rings 34 and 35 in any suitable manner as by spot welding. The forward clip 40 may be provided with an inwardly facing bent section 41 in one leg thereof so as to position a syringe 13 a selected distance above rings 34 and 35. The rear or outer clip 40 may be similarly formed.

Each pair of clips 40 are adapted to carry and position a syringe 13 with the axis of the syringe inclined downwardly at a preselected angle of inclination. The angle of inclination of the axes of each syringe is preferably between 10 to 18 for reasons pointed out hereinafter. Each syringe includes a shoulder 4-2 which is positioned forwardly of the inner clip 40 so that when a jet stream of fluid hits the syringe, the shoulder 42 in engagement with inner clip 40 will prevent axial movement of the syringe. Each syringe 13 includes a rear portion 43 held by the outer clip 40 and each syringe may include a relatively small diameter passageway 44 leading axially from the interior of the main hollow syringe body.

A plunger 46 for each syringe may be held by the clips 40 below the syringe 13 in substantially the same radial arrangement as the syringes 13. The outer clip 40 may grasp as at 47 an annular groove formed on such plungers 46.

It should be noted that the racks 33 each position and carry a plurality of syringes with the axes of the syringes lying in a pattern of a frustrum of an inverted cone, the inverted cone in this example being relatively shallow. The open ends of such syringes face the vertex of the cone and are spaced therefrom a suitable selected distance. The vertex of the cone lies on the axis of the rotatable means 14.

The rotatable means 14 for directing a jet stream of washing fluid intermittently and sequentially into said syringes may comprise a hollow upstanding post 50 carried by the bottom wall 20 and having a bottom portion 51 (Fig. 3) extending therebelow into the means 15 for supplying washing fluid. The hollow post 50 has its longitudinal axis virtually aligned with the axis about which the annular racks 33 are arranged. Adjacent the top portion of post 50 may be provided a plurality of circular openings 52. The top wall 53 of the post may be integrally formed with an upstanding pin 54 for aligning and pivotally mounted an elongated hollow rotatable sleeve member 55 which is provided with an axial bore 56 for receiving said pin.

The hollow sleeve member 55 encircles the post 50 for a major portion of the length of said post. The hollow sleeve 55 is preferably formed with an inner diameter greater than the outer diameter of post 50 so as to define therewith an annular longitudinally extending chamber 57. The top end wall of the sleeve member 55 may be provided with a depending annular rib 58 adapted to provide annular bearing contact with the circumferential margins of the end wall 53 of the post. The bottom portion of sleeve member 55 may be provided with an inturned flange 59 providing a circular opening adapted to receive the post 50 and to serve as a guide bearing for the sleeve member 55. It will thus be noted that the annular chamber 57 is closed at its lower end by flange 59 and provides a chamber for receiving fluids from the hollow post 50 through the ports 52- for discharging said fluid along the length of the sleeve member 55.

The provision of a closed annular chamber 57 and openings 52 formed in the post at the top thereof causes the sleeve member 55 to lift slightly when washing fluid is flowing through openings 52 and into the chamber 57 for providing a water bearing between the opposed end walls of the post and the sleeve member. Thus the sleeve member 55 is readily rotatable.

Longitudinally spaced along the length of the sleeve member 55 in corresponding relationship to vertically stacked racks 33 may be a plurality of nozzles 60 each communicating with the chamber 57. For dynamically balancing the sleeve member, nozzles 60 may be positioned in diametric relationship as shown in Fig. 4. Each nozzle 60 is secured to the sleeve member 55 with the axis of the nozzle inclined upwardly so as to be aligned with the axes of syringes 13 carried by an associated rack. With respect to an associated rack 33 and the syringes carried thereby, each nozzle 60 lies virtually at the vertex of the inverted cone formed by the pattern of the axes of the syringes. A jet stream of fluid ejected from each nozzle 60 will directly and fully enter into the open end of each syringe as the sleeve member is rotated.

A port 62 may be provided beneath each nozzle 60 for ejecting a stream of fluid against the end face of plunger 46. Each port 62 is radially arranged with respect to the axis of the sleeve member 55 and is inclined upwardly.

Means for rotating the sleeve member 55 may comprise arranging nozzles 60 with their axes angularly related to a diameter of the sleeve member 55 which intersects the nozzle axis at the circumference of the sleeve member as shown in Fig. 5 so that the reactive force of the jet stream will rotate the sleeve member. If desired, as shown in Fig. 5, diametrically opposed angle-shaped nozzles 61 may be provided in virtually the same horizontal zone adjacent the top of the sleeve member for producing a further positive rotative force to the sleeve member by utilizing the flow of the washing fluid. The nozzles 61 also spray the outside surfaces of the syringes and plungers. It is understood other means may be employed for rotating the sleeve member 55.

The means for supplying washing fluid to the hollow post and through the rotatable means 14 may comprise a multi-ported valve means 63, a fluid pump 64, a motor 65 to drive said pump and a source of washing fluid. The source of washing fluid may be connected through a hose 66 to the inlet port 67 of the valve 63. The inlet port 67 leads to an upper compartment 68 which is ported as at 69 for communication through the screen 22 with the interior of the enclosure 11. Opposite inlet port 67 an outlet port 70 may be provided for connect. ing compartment 68 to a hose 71 which leads to the intake 72 of the pump 64. The pump 64 includes a discharge 73 which is connected to a conduit 74 which leads to an inlet port 75 formed in the valve means 63 and which leads to a compartment 76 below compartment 63. The compartment 76 is normally in communication with the bottom end portion 51 of the hollow post 50.

A valve member 78 normally biased to open position by a spring 78a may be provided with a circular valve head 79 opposed to the open bottom end of the post 50 and adapted to be moved into seating relationship'with the bottom edge face of the portion 51 for closing the open bottom end of post 50 to shut-off flow of washing fluid through the post 50. In shut-off position the head- 79 is spaced from its normal valve seat on cylindrical element 80 for permitting flow of fluid from compartment 76 to a compartment 81 which is provided with a drain port 82 connected with a drain hose 83. Thus when the valve member 78 is in shut-off position, fluid from. the enclosure will be pumped through the ports 69 to the pump and then discharged from the pump through. the compartment at 76, the cylindrical element 80 and the drain hose 83.

Means for actuating the valve element 78 from open to shut-0ff position may comprise an arm 84 pivoted intermediate its end as at 85 to a depending bracket 86- carried by the valve means 63. The free end of arm 84 bears against an end face 87 of the valve member 78 which extends without the body of the valve means 63. The other end of arm 84 may be pivotally connected as at 88 to a crank arm 89 pivotally connected as at 90 to a rotatable member 91 fixed to a shaft 92. The shaft- 92 extends without the housing 28 and carries at its end an actuator knob 93 which is adapted to be partially turned for opening and closing of the valve means 63.

In operation of the syringe cleaning apparatus of this invention the syringes 13 to be cleaned may be positioned in the racks 33 as illustrated in the drawings. The racks 33 may then be vertically stacked within the enclosure 11. A selected amount of washing fluid, preferably containing a detergent, may be introduced into the enclosure by permitting a selected quantity of fluid to flow into the enclosure through the valve means 63 whilethe valve member 73 is in normally biased down position. It is not necessary to operate the pump during this filling operation because the fluid will flow upwardly through ports 69.

After a selected quantity of washing fluid has been provided in the enclosure 11, the pump may be started and the fluid in the enclosure will be drawn downwardly through compartment 68, to the pump, through compartment 76, upwardly through the hollow post 50 and ejected outwardly from the nozzles 60 in the sleeve member. The pump 64 continues to recirculate the washing fluid for a selected time as measured by an automatic timing device 95 diagrammatically illustrated as beingcarried by the housing 28 in Fig. l and operably con nected to the motor and pump. The path of the fluid at the bottomof the enclosure is controlled and channeled so as to facilitate recirculation thereof by means of a plurality of angularly spaced, radially and upwardly extending vanes 96 arranged about the post 50.

The action of the jet stream of fluid ejected from each nozzle 60 should be particularly noted. The pump 64 is selected so that fluid will be pumped through the rotatable means 14 and through each nozzle 60 at a relatively great velocity. A jet stream thus ejected from a nozzle 60 is virtually a solid stream with very little dispersion of the fluid particles thereof. This virtually'solid stream of fluid hits a syringe which is axially aligned with the axis of the nozzle from which the stream is ejected in such a manner that a large volume of washing fluid is rammed into the syringe. The large volume of ramming fluid hits the end wall of the syringe and then attempts to double back upon itself with the result that an extremely turbulent action of the fluid is created within the syringe. This turbulent action provides a hard washing action which completely and thoroughly contacts entire internal surfaces of the syringe and thereby effectively flushes and washes said surfaces. In the syringes illustrated, the relatively small port 44 provided at the end is likewise thoroughly cleaned because the high velocity ramming fluid introduced into the larger chamber of the syringe forces a part of said fluid under pressure through the smaller port and thus cleans the internal surfaces of said smaller port 44. Immediately after the jet stream has hit a syringe, the jet stream passes to the adjacent syringe because of rotation of the sleeve member 53. The downward inclination of the syringes relatively rapidly drains the fluid from each syringe so that when the nozzle is rota-ted past said syringe again, the syringe will be virtually empty and capable of receiving another ramming slug of jet fluid.

Rotation of the sleeve member 55 and the nozzles 60 is preferably performed at a rate wherein each syringe is subjected to the above described hard washing action approximately twice each second and a half. Maintename of this intermittent hard washing action for a period of from three to five minutes serves to completely and effectively clean the internal surfaces of the syringes or of any other form of open-ended hollow tubular element placed in said racks.

Since the jet stream of fluid ejected from each nozzle is continuous, the stream of fluid also hits exterior surfaces of the syringes. The path of the jet stream is broken up and dispersed upon hitting the clips 40 and the exterior surfaces of the syringes so that washing fluid is' forcibly and turbulently sprayed against exterior surfaces of the syringe and the exterior surfaces of the plungers 46. A jet stream of fluid from each port 62 hits the end faces of the respective plungers 46 and thoroughly cleans said faces. A virtually complete washing of a syringe and its associated plunger is thus effected.

After the syringes have been thoroughly cleaned by the intermittent hard washing action of the detergent solution, the detergent solution may be drained in pumping from the enclosure and rinsing fluid introduced into the enclosure for circulation of the rinsing fluid for a predetermined length of time in order to completely and thoroughly rinse the internal and external surfaces of the syringes.

In Fig. 7 is illustrated a different modification of the rotatable jet nozzle means and the manner of mounting said rotatable means. A sleeve member 55 includes nozzles 60' as in the prior embodiment. In order to direct a jet stream of fluid against the end face of a plunger which is carried below the syringe on the rack, a small nozzle 100 may be provided in the sleeve member 55 diametrically opposite to its associated nozzle 60 and spaced below the nozzle 60'. A jet stream ejected from nozzle 100 is inclined upwardly and hits the end face of a plunger carried by the rack.

The sleeve member 55 carries a bearing ring 101 which is provided with an annular recess 102 for receiving the end of sleeve 55. The bearing ring 101 may be secured to the end of sleeve member 55 in any well known manner. The inner face of the bearing ring 101 provides a bearing surface which engages the adjacent outer surface of post 50'.

Secured to the bottom edge face of the bearing ring 101 may be a rectangular plate 103 lying in a plane perpendicular to the axis of sleeve member 55. The plate 103 carries at each corner a depending blade 104 having its bottom edge spaced above the bottom wall 20' of the enclosure. The blades 104 lie in vertical planes which may intersect the axis of rotation of sleeve member 55'. Below plate 103 a generally frusto-conical strainer or sieve member 105 may be provided for preventing foreign matter from entering the pumping unit and being recirculated through the system.

The plate 103 and the blades 104 carried thereby serve the purpose of controlling motion of fluid in the bottom of the enclosure so that fluid will properly drain through the opening in the bottom wall 20. The blades 104 may also act to slow down rotation of the sleeve member 55'. The braking action of the blades 104 in the water assists in providing a greater range of control of the speed of rotation of the sleeve member 55.

In Fig. 8 is shown a modification of the rack means whereby syringes may be readily accurately positioned in the rack in proper position for receiving a jet stream of water. In Fig. 8 radially spaced aligned clips 107 are carried by rings 34 and 35 in a manner similar to that previously described. Each clip 107, however, includes a laterally oflset portion 108 on each upwardly directed leg 109. The offset portions 108 are spaced apart so as to receive a selected size of syringe and the shoulders 110 formed thereby support said syringe.

In order to properly position a syringe longitudinally on the clips 107, a positioning ring 112 is carried by the rack radially inwardly of the inner clips 107 and above the syringe axes when a syringe is held by clips 107. The ring 112 is spaced from inner clip 107 so that the large open end of a syringe may be received and held in inner clip 107. The other small end of the syringe carries a tip with which a hypodermic needle cooperates. The ring 112 is spaced close enough to the inner clip 107 so that if a syringe is reversed with large open end facing outwardly the small end will contact the positioning ring when the syringe is attempted to be inserted into clips 107. Thus the syringe cannot be held by clips 107 with the wrong end presented to the jet stream.

It will thus be readily apparent to those skilled in the art that an extremely efiicient and effective method of washing open-ended hollow tubular elements of various diameters may be readily accomplished. Various sizes of nozzles may be employed, depending upon the size of hollow tubular element to be washed. While a semi-automatic arrangement has been illustrated, it is understood that the apparatus of this invention may be made fully automatic by well-known means so that a complete washing and rinsing cycle may be automatically performed.

Various other modifications and changes may be made in the apparatus described above which come within the spirit of this invention and all such changes and modifications coming within the scope of the appended claims are embraced thereby.

I claim:

1. In an apparatus for washing syringes, the combination of: a hollow enclosure including a bottom wall; a plurality of vertically stacked annular racks arranged in the enclosure and supported thereby about a common axis, said racks having positioning means adapted to carry a plurality of downwardly inclined syringes having open ends radially inwardly facing toward said axis; a hollow, non-rotatable post extending upwardly from the bottom wall and virtually coaxial with said axis, said post including a plurality of openings therein and being in communication with a supply of washing fluid; a hollow rotatable sleeve member carried by the post and defining with the post a longitudinally extending annular chamber in communication with the fluid in the post; a plurality of longitudinally spaced nozzles on the sleeve member in communication with the chamber, each nozzle being inclined upwardly to align with positioning means on an associated rack for forcibly ejecting directly into the open end of each opposed syringe a jet stream of washing fluid during rotation of the sleeve member; and means for supplying washing fluid to the nozzles through said post.

2. An apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein the bottom wall is provided with an outlet in communication with the means for supplying washing fluid for recirculating said washing fluid.

3. An apparatus as claimed in claim 2 wherein upstanding, radially extending vanes are provided on the bottom wall for directing flow of fluid to said outlet.

4. An apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein each rack includes means for holding plungers associated with each syringe being washed for washing said plungers.

5. In an apparatus for washing hollow tubular elements each having at least one open end, the combination of: a hollow enclosure; a plurality of vertically stacked annular racks supported by the enclosure and arranged about a common axis, each rack having positioning means adapted to carry a plurality of downwardly inclined elements having their open ends facing said axis; a hollow, non-rotatable post aligned with said axis and including a plurality of openings therein, said post being in communication with a supply of washing fluid; a hollow, rotatable sleeve member carried by the post and defining therewith an annular chamber extending longitudinally of said post in communication with fluid within said post; a plurality of longitudinally spaced ports in the sleeve member in communication with the chamber, each port being opposed to and aligned with positioning means on an associated rack for directing a jet stream of washing fluid into the open end of each element carried by said associated rack during rotation of the sleeve member; and means for recirculating Washing fluid ejected from said ports.

6. In an apparatus for continuously, intermittently washing internal surfaces of hollow, tubular elements, each having an open end, the combination of: means to support and hold in circular arrangement a plurality of tubular elements with radially directed axes; nozzle means rotatably supported and having an axis of rotation coincident with the center of said circular arrangement and alignable sequentially with each of said tubular elements; means for rotating said nozzle means; means for supplying washing fluid under high pressure to said nozzle means; said support means having resilient clip means for holding said tubular elements against longitudinal movement upon impact of a ram jet of fluid from said nozzle means with said tubular elements.

7. In an apparatus for continuously, intermittently washing internal surfaces of hollow tubular elements, each having an open end, the combination of: means to support and hold in circular arrangement a plurality of tubular elements With radially directed axes; nozzle means rotatably supported and having an axis of rotation coincident with the center of said circular arrangement and alignable sequentially with each of said tubular elements; means for rotating said nozzle means; means for supplying washing fluid under high pressure to said nozzle means; said support means having means for holding said tubular elements against longitudinal movement upon impact of a ram jet of fluid from said nozzle means with said tubular elements, said support and holding means including radially spaced clip means for releasably holding a tubular element.

8. In an apparatus for continuously, intermittently washing internal surfaces of hollow tubular elements, each having an open end, the combination of: means to support and hold in circular! arrangement a plurality of tubular elements with radially directed axes; nozzle means rotatably supported and having an axis of rotation coincident with the center of said circular arrangement and alignable sequentially with each of said tubular elements; means for rotating said nozzle means; means for supply- .ing washing fluid under high pressure to said nozzle means; said support means having means for holding said tubular elements against longitudinal movement upon impact of a ram jet of fluid from said nozzle means with said tubular elements, said support and holding means including interconnected, concentric ring elements, clip means carried by each ring element along spaced radians of said ring elements to receive a plurality of tubular elements, and a positioning ring adjacent to the clip means carried by the inner concentric ring element for admitting a tubular element to said clip means in one position only.

9. In an apparatus for washing internal surfaces of a syringe having an enlarged open end at one end thereof, the combination of: a hollow enclosure including a bottom wall; a hollow, rotatable sleeve member positioned centrally of said hollow enclosure and supported by said bottom wall, said sleeve member being provided with a plurality of longitudinally spaced nozzle means; a plurality of vertically stacked annular racks arranged in the enclosure and provided with means to support in radial arrangement a plurality of syringes, said support means positioning said syringes in downward inclination with enlarged open ends facing said sleeve member and in alignment with said opposed nozzle means, said support means having resilient releasable means adapted to hold each syringe against axial movement; and means carried at the bottom of said sleeve member for at least partial immersion in fluid in the bottom of said enclosure for re tarding rotation of the sleeve member.

10. An apparatus as claimed in claim 9 wherein the means carried at the bottom of said sleeve member include depending spaced vanes.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 321,128 Merriam June 30, 1885 1,246,556 Crow Nov. 13, 1917 1,323,216 Cornwall Nov. 25, 1919 1,638,549 Ohmart Aug. 9, 1927 1,763,992 Smith June 17, 1930 2,237,209 Arnold Apr. 1, 1941 FOREIGN PATENTS 699,209 Germany Nov. 25, 1940

Patent Citations
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US321128 *Jun 30, 1885 Bottle-washer
US1246556 *Jan 23, 1915Nov 13, 1917Jesse J CrowDish-washing machine.
US1323216 *Oct 2, 1916Nov 25, 1919 cornwall and c
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2915073 *Nov 29, 1954Dec 1, 1959Babson Bros CoMilk pipe line washing system
US3080874 *Jul 27, 1959Mar 12, 1963Gen Motors CorpDishwasher
US3358702 *May 21, 1965Dec 19, 1967Schaap TheodoreCombination disposal and washer
US7278433 *Dec 23, 2003Oct 9, 2007Dole Fresh Vegetables, Inc.Washing a cored lettuce head
US7484514Oct 9, 2007Feb 3, 2009Dole Fresh Vegetables, Inc.Washing a corded lettuce head
Classifications
U.S. Classification134/112, 134/176, 211/120, 134/168.00R, 134/186, 134/111
International ClassificationA61M5/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M5/001
European ClassificationA61M5/00C