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Publication numberUS2754997 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 17, 1956
Filing dateJun 10, 1953
Priority dateJun 10, 1953
Publication numberUS 2754997 A, US 2754997A, US-A-2754997, US2754997 A, US2754997A
InventorsRichard E Hopkins, Raymond J Lohr
Original AssigneeMarx & Co Louis
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toy water gun
US 2754997 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 17, 1956 R. E. HOI =KINS ET AL TOY WATER GUN 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 10, 1953 INVENTOR. RICHARD E. HOPKINS RAYMOND J. LOHR ATTORNEY J y 1956 R. E. HIOPKINS ET AL TOY WATER GUN Filed June 10, 1953 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.

RICHARD E. HOPKINS RAYMOND J. LOHR El 5 8 BY M ATTORNEY United States Patent ()fice 2,754,997 Fatented .luly l7, 195

TOY WATER GUN Richard E. Hopkins and Raymond J. Lohr, Erie, Pa., as-

signors to Louis Marx & Company, Tue, New York, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application June 10, 1953, Serial No. 360,634

11 Claims. (Cl. 22279) This invention relates to water guns, and more particularly to such a gun having the length and configuration of a shoulder gun, such as a shotgun or a rifle of the like.

Water pistols have been made for many years. In modern form the pistol grip or handle acts as a water reservoir and also houses a pump which is actuated'by a simulated trigger. The pump ejects water through a suitable small bore hole at the muzzle.

The primary object of the present invention is to gen.- erally improve water guns. A more particular object is to provide a water gun of such length and configuration as to simulate a shoulder gun rather than a pistol. It is evident that such a gun will have an enormously increased water storage capacity, and other advantages whichwill be pointed out later.

With the pump located in the usual rear position behind the trigger, it would be necessary to provide a long water discharge passage from the pump at the stock, to the muzzle of the gun. This would be costly, and would introduce hydraulic friction and reduce efficiency.

In accordance with one feature and object of the present invention, the pump is located in the barrel portion of the gun, and is much nearer the forward end than the rear end of the gun. Moreover, in order to provide a simple, direct and dependable mechanism for operating the pump, we provide the gun with a forearm grip in simulation of a repeating gun, and we use the simulated forearm grip to actuate the pump, instead of using a trigger. This construction has the important advantage of providing a forcible arm action for the pump, far greater than that obtainable when using a mere finger-operated trigger.

As so far described it would be necessary to provide a long suction pipe extending rearwardly and downwardly from the pump to the lowermost and rearmost corner of the stock. This would be expensive, and would reduce the efficiency of the pump action. A further object of the present invention is to overcome this difliculty, which we do by providing a dam in the barrel portion acting as a water trap to provide a localized auxiliary reservoir. The large gun stock is made hollow and water-proof, and acts as the main reservoir. The water pump is supplied with Water from the localized or auxiliary reservoir, and indeed the pump may be immersed in the auxiliary reservoir. With this arrangement water may be transferred at intervals from the main reservoir to the auxiliary reservoir by simply tilting the muzzle of the gun downward.

To accomplish the foregoing general objects, and other more specific objects which will hereinafter appear, our invention resides in the water gun elements, and their relation one to another, as are hereinafter more particularly described in the following specification. The specification is accompanied by drawings, inwhich:

Fig. 1 is a partially sectioned plan View of a water gun embodying features of our invention;

Fig. 2 is an elevation of the same;

Fig. 3 is a longitudinal section taken in the plane of the line'33 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary perspective view showing how a muzzle plug is received and mounted between the two halves of the gun at the muzzle;

Fig. 5 is a plan view of the pump of the gun, drawn to enlarged scale;

Fig. dis a section taken in the plane of the line 66 of Fig. 5;

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary partially sectioned elevation showing how the pump is immersed in the auxiliary reservoir;

Fig. 8 is a section taken approximately in the plane of the line 8-3 of Fig. 1, with the parts drawn to enlarged scale;

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary elevation of a part of one half of the gun, with the pump removed;

Fig. 10 is a rear end view of the forearm grip, with the back end plate removed; and

Fig. 11 is a section through the muzzle plug and valve mechanism.

Referring to the drawing, and more particularly to Fig. 3, the gun comprises a forward portion 12 and a rear portion 14, the rear portion being hollow and watertight, and acting as a main water reservoir. The gun further comprises a dam 16 in the forward portion 12, and this dam acts as a water trap to providea localized auxiliary reservoir 18. There is also a water pump generally desighated 2t), and this is supplied with water from the auxiliary reservoir 18. The gun further comprises means, in this case a forearm grip 22, to operate the pump. A small discharge hole is provided at the muzzle of the. gun. In this case the hole is conveniently formed in a suitable muzzle plug 24;, and water is forced from the pump through the muzzle plug. They are preferably connected bya suitable tube 2 6, and the use of such a tube is convenient when, as in the present case, the gun simulates a shotgun having the usual large diameter. shotgun barrel. With a gun simulating a small bore rifle the barrel itself may beused asthe connection between the pump and the muzzle. V

Considering the arrangement more specifically, the gun is long and shaped to simulate a shoulder weapon, the forward portion 12 here shown simulatesra shotgun barrel, and the rear portion 14 simulates the stock of a shotgun. The operating member 22 is longitudinally slidable beneath the barrel 12, and simulates the forearm grip of a repeating weapon. Thus the damlo is located behind the forearm grip 22, and the waterpump 20 is, located in the barrel portion of the gun ahead of the dam and. at the forearm grip. The piston rod 30 of the pump is connected'to the forearm grip 22 by means of a crosspin 32, which passes through slots in the gun, and, at the ends of which pin, are secured to the grip 22 by rivet heads as shown at 32 in Figs. 2 and 8. K

Referring to Fig. 1, the main body of the gun is preferably molded out of a suitable plastic, for example, high impact polystyrene, and the particular plastic used may have or may be sprayed with a gun-metal finish in order to improve 1 the realistic appearance of the gun. The main body of the gun is molded in two halves, indicated at 34 and 36, and separating on a center plane. 38. The halves as molded are generally alike, but include a few specific differences, apart from the fact that one .is a lefthand side and the other is a righthand side.

For example, at certain points one-half of the gun may be provided with tiny dowel projections, such as those indicated at 40, 42 and 44 in Fig. 3, while the other half is provided with mating holes tofreceive the dowels, The parts 46 and 48 are frusto-conical projections which come together from opposite sides of the stock, in abutting relation in order to rigidify and strengthen the stock despite the use of a comparatively thin wall thickness; The halves of the gun are provided with aisemicircular opening, which together provide a circular' opening to receive a suitable filler cap or stopper 50. This is preferably made of rubber and is preferably molded integrally with an anchor strap 52, the latter having a hole which is forced over a headed projection 54. The latter is made of two halves each molded integrally with the main body.

The body as molded includes the dam 16 and a horizontal extension thereof marked 56 (Fig. 3). When the parts of the body are secured together by the use of a suitable solvent or adhesive, the latter may be applied also to the edges of dam 16 and its extension 56. If only the vertical dam 16 were present, the gun could be tilted upward to an angle greater than that shown in Fig. 7, but the angle would be limited because the intake valve of the pump must be immersed in water. However, with the added horizontal extension 56 the gun may be tilted upward at a much steeper angle, while still retaining water around the intake valve.

If desired, and preferably, a small notch is made in the dam 56, as shown at 57 in Fig. 3 and Fig. 7. This permits air to escape when refilling the auxiliary reservoir from the main reservoir. The vent is preferably made small so that any escape of water through the vent when the gun is tipped upwardly is rather slow, in which case the benefit of the horizontal dam 56 is retained.

The auxiliary reservoir is bounded at its forward end by a step-shaped partition best shown at 58, 60, and 62 in Fig. 9. The horizontal part 60 has a half round recess at 64 which acts to receive a mating part of the pump. The vertical partition 62 has a half round and V-sectioned recess which receives another mating part of the pump.

Referring now to Figs. and 6, the pump is itself molded out of a suitable plastic such as polystyrene. It comprises a main cylinder 70 having a discharge connection 72 molded integrally therewith, and also having a part of an intake valve assembly molded integrally therewith at a point diametrically opposite the part 72. The forward end 76 is molded integrally with the cylinder, including a V-sectioned annulus or ring 78. The rear end of cylinder 70 is closed by a suitable spring retainer cap 80, which is cemented in position after inserting in the cylinder a piston 82 and a return spring 84. The piston 82 may be molded of plastic, and includes several thin gasket discs 86 and 88 backed by a thin metal disc 90 against which the spring 84 bears. The piston 82 is recessed at its forward end to receive the rear end of the piston rod 30, the latter being a cylindrical rod with an integrally molded solid enlargement 92 at its forward end. This has fiat sides, with a hole 94 passing diametrically therethrough.

The intake valve is completed by means of a valve retainer cap 96 which is cemented to the part 74 previously mentioned. The retainer cap has a conical seat supporting a ball check valve 98. This works gravitationally.

Reverting now to Fig. 9, it may be explained that the semi-circular groove 66 of the gun body receives and accurately fits the annular ring 78 shown in Figs. 5 and 6, and that the semi-circular seat 64 receives and accurately fits the cylindrical part 72 shown in Figs. 5 and 6. Moreover, while not apparent from the drawing, the outside diameter of the valve retainer cap 96 shown in Fig. 6, is selected to fill the side-to-side space between the inside walls of the halves of the gun body. Thus the pump assembly is seated in and securely held by the two halves of the gun when the latter are cemented together.

Moreover, in Fig. 9 attention is directed to the upper and lower guide tracks 102 and 104 which are located directly above and below the slot 106. The pin 32 (Fig. 2) passes through the slot 106 (and through a registering slot in the opposite side of the gun). The pin also passes through the enlargement 92 at the forward end of the piston rod. Thus with the ends of the pin passing through and secured to the sides of the forearm grip, as shown in Fig. 8, it will be evident that longitudinal reciprocation of the forearm grip causes a similar movement of the piston rod. The guide tracks 102 and 104 cooperate with the fiat vertical sides of the enlargement 92, and help guide the enlargement, and also help insure against unintended rotation of the enlargement during assembly of the gun, for such rotation would, of course, interfere with passage of the pin 32 through the parts of the gun as a more or less final step in the assembly of the same.

It has already been mentioned in connection with Fig. 3 that the muzzle plug 24 is connected to the pump by means of a tube 26. Referring now to Fig. 6 it will be seen that the rear end of the tube 26 is inserted in and may be cemented to the cylindrical upstanding connection 72 of the pump. The material of the tube 26 is preferably a flexible plastic. The pump 20 is rigidly mounted in the gun, and similarly the muzzle plug 24 is rigidly mounted in the gun, and in proper axial alignment with the barrel of the gun.

This is accomplished in a manner in which may be explained with reference to Figs. 3 and 4 of the drawing. The muzzle plug 24 is essentially a stepped cylinder having a larger diameter portion 108, which is reduced at the rear to a smaller diameter portion 110. The flexible tube 26 is inserted in and secured to the rear end of the part 110. The forward part 108 has a V-section ring 112 formed thereon, and this is received in a mating V-section groove 114 which is molded in the two halves of the gun, as shown in Fig. 4. Moreover, each half of the gun has an additional support 116, and these supports project toward one another and receive and hold the small diameter rearward part of the muzzle plug. Thus the muzzle plug is securely anchored in position and is held in proper axial alignment with the barrel of the gun. Assembly of the muzzle plug 24 and the pump 20 into the gun is greatly facilitated by the flexible character of the tube 26 which interconnects the same.

It will be understood that these parts may be made up ahead of time as a sub-assembly, that is, the pump may be assembled; the parts of the muzzle plug may be assembled; these two assemblies may be joined by tube 26; and the resulting sub-assembly may be placed in one-half of the gun before adding the other half.

The muzzle plug 24 preferably contains a discharge valve, and this eliminates the need for a valve ball directly above the pump in the connection 72 (Fig. 6). By locating the valve in the muzzle plug there is no dripping of water out of the muzzle of the gun when tilted downward. The valve is best shown in Fig. 11 of the drawing, referring to which it will be seen that there is a passage 130 the left end of which acts as a valve seat cooperating with a valve disc or gasket 132, which in turn is backed by a metal disc 134. The latter is urged rearwardly by a compression spring 136 housed in a valve chamber 138. This is formed in the forward part of the smaller diameter piece 110 of the nozzle plug assembly. The forward end of the piece 110 is secured within the large diameter part 108, as by means of a solvent or cement. When the pump is actuated the valve opens and water is ejected through the fine bore nozzle opening 140. This may be counterbored slightly as shown at 142.

Referring now to Fig. 1 of the drawing, it may be explained that each half of the gun has molded on the outside a pair of studs which act as a guide for the forearm grip 22. Referring to Fig. 10 it will be seen that the forearm grip is molded in one piece and includes guide tracks 122. These are slid over the studs 120 when assembling the gun, following which the crosspin 32 may be inserted and appropriately riveted or upset at its ends. This will hold the parts in assembly, because the crosspin and pump action will themselves limit the longitudinal travel of the forearm grip. However, for improved appearance the rear end of the forearm grip is closed by a suitablemoldable plasticplate indicated at 124 in Fig. 3. The rear edge of the forearm grip 22 may be recessed to receive the plate 124 when the latter is cemented in position. This is shown at 125 in Fig. 10.

The barrel 12 is generally cylindrical, except for a raised rib 126 along the top. The rear portion of the barrel is enlarged downward to form a lower nearly cylindrical portion 128 '(Fig. 8) which terminates at 130 (Fig. 3). In a sense the forearm grip 22 rides on this lower portion 128, and in any event encloses it. Referring now to Fig. 3, it will be seen that this lower portion is dropped even further at 132, thereby forming a sump for the auxiliary reservoir 18. The intake valve of pump 29 is disposed in the sump 132. It will be noted that the sump is housed and concealed Within the slidable forearm grip 22.

It is believed that the construction and operation, as well as the advantages of our improved water gun, will be apparent from the foregoing detailed description. To load the gun the stopper 5% is opened and water is poured through the filler opening until the gun seems full. The large quantity of water which will be carried by the gun is evident without further comment, and the gun may be designed to fire about two hundred full length shots at each loading. To fire the gun it is held with the stock resting against ones shoulder, with the right hand at the trigger guard, and with the left hand at the forearm grip. To fire the gun the grip is pulled rearward, thus forcibly ejecting a fine stream of water.

This operation may be repeated continuously while the gun is full. Later when the quantity of water has been substantially reduced, the gun may be fired for some twelve full length shots after each filling of the auxiliary reservoir 18. When the water in the auxiliary reservoir is exhausted, or at intervals without waiting for the water to be exhausted, it is merely necessary to tilt the gun with the muzzle downward, whereupon water flows from the stock forward to the auxiliary reservoir, and on again raising the muzzle of the gun the excess water returns to the stock but a quantity of water is trapped in the auxiliary reservoir, ready for another series of shots.

This is illustrated in Fig. 7, in which it will be seen that the gun is tilted upwardly so that there is no water visible immediately behind the dam 16 (although there may still be a good supply of water in the large hollow stock of the gun), yet a quantity of water is trapped in the auxiliary reservoir 18 ahead of the dam l6, and this water supplies the pump 20.

The front location of the pump permits economical construction, combined with a very realistic shape of the gun. The use of the auxiliary reservoir permits most of the gun body to be used as a water reservoir. Thus a large amount of water can be carried for a very large number of full shots, and an even greater number of short shots, for the number of shots which may be fired is greatly increased if the pump stroke is cut short. The use of the forearm grip as a pump actuating mechanism permits the gun to be operated by even a small child, and provides a strong water ejection because the full power of the childs arm is used, instead of only a single finger. I

It will be understood that while we have shown and described our invention in a preferred form, changes may be made in the structure shown, without departing from the scope of the invention, as sought to be defined in the following claims.

We claim:

1. A water gun having an elongated forward portion and an enlarged rear portion, said forward portion being normally at a higher level than said rear portion, said rear portion being hollow and Watertight and acting as a main water reservoir, a dam in the forward portion acting as a water trap to provide a localized auxiliary reservoir, said dam normally preventing water from run- 6 ning back from said auxiliary reservoir to said main reservoir, a water pump located in the forward portion and supplied from said auxiliary reservoir, means to operate said pump, and a discharge nozzle connected to said pump, the arrangement being such that water may be transferred from the main reservoir to the auxiliary reservoir at intervals by tilting the gun, thereby dispensing with the need for a suction supply from said main reservoir to said pump.

2. A water gun having a barrel and a stock and a forearm grip, said stock being hollow and Water-tight and acting as a main water reservoir, a .dam in the barrel portion acting as a water trap to provide a localized auxiliary reservoir, a Water pump located near the auxiliary reservoir and the forearm grip, said Water pump being connected to said forearm grip for actuation thereby, said water pump being supplied from said auxiliary reservoir, and a discharge nozzle at the muzzle of the gun connected to the pump, the arrangement being such that water may be transferred from the main reservoir to the auxiliary reservoir at intervals by tilting the gun.

3. A water gun in the form of a repeating gun having a barrel and a stock and a forearm grip movable relative to the barrel, said stock being hollow and water-tight and acting as a main water reservoir, a dam in the barrel portion acting as a water trap to provide a localized auxiliary reservoir, a water pump located near the auxiliary reservoir and the forearm grip, said water pump being connected to said forearm grip for actuation thereby, said water pump being supplied from said auxiliary reservoir, and a discharge nozzle at the muzzle of the gun connected to the pump.

4. A water gun in the form of a repeating gun having a barrel and a stock and a forearm grip slidable beneath the barrel, said stock being hollow and water-tight and acting as a main water reservoir, a dam in the barrel portion behind the forearm grip acting as a water trap to provide a localized auxiliary reservoir at the forearm grip, a water pump located in the barrel portion at the forearm grip, the piston rod of said water pump being connected to said forearm grip for actuation thereby, Water pump being immersed in and supplied from said auxiliary reservoir, and a discharge nozzle at the muzzle of the gun connected to the pump, the arrangement being such that water may be transferred from the main reservoir to the auxiliary reservoir at intervals by tilting the muzzle of the gun downward, and there being no need to provide a pump suction tube from the pump to the stock.

5. A gun as defined in claim 2, in which the auxiliary reservoir is provided with a depressed sump housed within the forearm grip, and in which the intake of the pump is disposed in said sump.

6. A gun as defined in claim 3, in which the auxiliary reservoir is provided with a depressed sump housed within the forearm grip, and in which the intake of the pump is disposed in said sump.

7. A gun as defined in claim 4, in which the auxiliary reservoir is provided with a depressed sump housed within the forearm grip, and in which the intake of the pump is disposed in said sump.

8. A gun as defined in claim 3, in which the body of the gun simulates a shotgun, and in which the pump is connected to the discharge nozzle at the muzzle of the gun by means of a slender tube housed within the simulated shotgun barrel of the gun.

9. A gun as defined in claim 4, in which the body of the gun simulates a shotgun, and in which the pump is connected to the discharge nozzle at the muzzle of the gun by means of a slender flexible tube housed within the simulated shotgun barrel of the gun.

10. A gun as defined in claim 3, in which there is a filler cap at the breech, so located as to somewhat resemble the hammer of a rifle.

11. A water gun in the form of an elongated shoulder gun having a barrel and a stock, said stock being hollow and water-tight and acting as a main water reservoir, a dam in the barrel portion acting as a water trap to provide a localized auxiliary reservoir, said auxiliary reservoir having a mean level which is higher than the mean level of the main reservoir when the barrel is in horizontal position, a water pump in the barrel portion supplied from said auxiliary reservoir, means to operate said pump, and a discharge nozzle at the muzzle of the gun connected to said pump, the arrangement being such that water may be transferred from the main reservoir to the auxiliary reservoir at intervals by tilting the muzzle of the gun downward, said auxiliary reservoir having sufficient capacity for repeated operations of the References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,706,532 Lefever Mar. 26, 1929 1,839,870 Dorph Ian. 5, 1932 2,435,527 Arpin Feb. 3, 1948 2,589,963 Richardson Mar. 18, 1952 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,902 Australia Apr. 30, 1931

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1706532 *Dec 5, 1927Mar 26, 1929Daisy Mfg CoLiquid gun
US1839870 *Feb 1, 1930Jan 5, 1932Dorph DagfinWeapon
US2435527 *Sep 11, 1947Feb 3, 1948Arpin John WilliamPacking assembly for water pistols
US2589963 *Apr 16, 1948Mar 18, 1952Richardson IrvingWater gun
AU190231A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3163330 *Mar 2, 1962Dec 29, 1964Mattel IncToy water shooting cap rifle
US4630757 *Jul 3, 1985Dec 23, 1986Hiroshi YanoToy gun
US5052587 *Dec 4, 1989Oct 1, 1991Graves John GWater gun
US5622159 *May 5, 1995Apr 22, 1997Lcd International, L.L.C.Toy weapon firing a shapeless semi-solid charge
US20150108161 *Oct 18, 2013Apr 23, 2015Philip YoungUltraviolet water gun
DE1200170B *Sep 7, 1962Sep 2, 1965Mattel IncSpielzeug-Wasserspritzwaffe
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/79, 222/324, 222/341, 222/385, 222/567
International ClassificationF41B9/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41B9/0037
European ClassificationF41B9/00B4D