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Publication numberUS2756677 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 31, 1956
Filing dateOct 14, 1950
Priority dateOct 14, 1950
Publication numberUS 2756677 A, US 2756677A, US-A-2756677, US2756677 A, US2756677A
InventorsMccullough Ira J
Original AssigneeMccullough Tool Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Well perforating device
US 2756677 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 3l, 195.6 n. 1. MCCULLOUGH WELL PERFORATING DEVICE 3 Sheets--Sheerl l Filed OCt. 14, 1950 fr0 d. MCCU//ouy INVENTOR.

ATTORNEY July 31, 1956 J. MCCULLOUGH WELL PERFORATING DEVICE 3 Sheets-Sheet. 2

Filed Oct. 14, 1950 fr0 L MCCU//ough INVENTOR.

@J4/AL ATTORNEY July 3l, 1956 J. MccULLOUGl-l WELL PEREORATING DEVICE 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Oct. 14, 1950 IN VEN TOR.

fm d. MCcU//ough ATTORNEY United States WELL PERFORMING nevica Iray J. McCullough, Los Angeles, Calif., assignor to McCullough Tool Company, Los Angeles, Calif., a corporation of Nevada Application October 14, 1950, Serial No. 190,105

'13 Claims. (Cl. IGZ- 20) This invention relates to devices employed in perforating the wall of a well bore and particularly to an improved form of` carrier employed to supportV explosive perforating charges of the hollow or so-called jet type during the operations of lowering such charges into a well bore, and'iring them after the carrier is in place, and which is thereafter retrievable from the well bore.

In the art of well perforating by means of explosive hollow charges, it is normally desirable to employ a multiplicity of perforating units, arranged generally longitudinally along a carrier, and which may be* tired, ordinarily simultaneously, or substantially so, to provide a corresponding plurality of perforations along the opposite section of the wall of the well bore. Various types of carriers have heretofore been employed which fall into two general classes, namely, recoverable and expendible. The recoverable type is ordinarily constructed in the form of a cylindrical steel body, which may be solid or hollow, and which is provided with a plurality of sockets, receptacles, or barrels into which the perforating units may bel inserted and protected against intrusion of well uids by suitable sealing covers or caps. The several perforating units are ordinarily connected to a suitable detonating train which yextends through the interior of the carrier body. Carriers of this general type haveseveral disadvantages inthat they are relatively expensive and complicated to construct, and although recoverable, normally suffer considerable battering and damage by the explosion of the charges, so that they may only be run a very few times before they mustbe discarded or require extensive re-machining or repair before re-use. Also, they. are necessarily relatively rigid, heavy, and bulky and must be, of considerable length to support the. substantial. number of charges commonly employed for a single run, have only relatively small clearance with respect to the wall of the well bore, and'consequently cannot be usedvto carry large. shaped charges in the well bore. As a result, they are subject to becoming.V stuck in the well bore, particularly where the latter is not straight or smooth, and often present diiculty in lowering and'in the recovery after tiring. Also, if such bodies should become broken in the well bore, a not uncommon occurrence, shing these broken parts out of the well may be very diicult or even impossible because of their size and mass.

Expendible carriers are of various types and may be constructed of various metals, plastics, cement and the like, and may be made in solid or open-Work structural form, all of' which are designed to disintegrate or shatter under the explosive forces of the charges.y Such carriers have the principal disadvantage thatthe pieces resulting from their disintegration remain in the well bore where they may plug the perforations made by the charges and may have to be washed or lished from the well borevto. clear the latter properly. Thus, in the case of expendable carriers, it isr highly desirable to provide constructions which will leave a minimum of so-called junk in thewell bore after use;

2,756,677 Patented July 3l, 19,56

Accordingly, the principal. objects of this. invention include the provision of an improved form of carrier for hollow-type explosive charges for insertion in awell bore, which will effectively support and positionI any desired number of such charges; which will leave a minimum amount of junk in the well bore; which, is of exceptionally simple and cheap construction such that it may be expended in use; which, while expendable in the sense that it is not re-usable, is nevertheless recoverable from the well bore; which permits use of charges of maximum dimensions for a given well bore diameter; which furnishes a positive indication of the firing of the several charges; and which possesses a high degree of exibility-such that it may be readily lowered through, and removed from, well bores which are not perfectly straight and smooth.

More specifically, the improved carrier in accordance with one embodiment of this invention comprises a narrow elongated strip of flat material, which mayk be relatively softand pliable metal, such as ordinary aluminum, brass, copper, zinc, or steel sheet, having a width such as to be readily insertible in the bore of a well. The side margins of the strip may be re-inforced in any suitable manner, as by bending the edgesat right angles to the plane of the strip to form short flanges; by rolling or crimping the edges to form beads thereon; or by rolling or crimping the edges around steel wires extending longitudinally along the side edges. Intermediate the edges of the strip and preferably along the center portion thereof, a plurality of longitudinally spaced holes or openings is provided for mounting individual perforating units which may be held in place by any suitable fastening means,y such as wire, clips, tape or the like. The upper end of the strip carrier is adapted for attachment to a lowering cable and a firing head for firing a detonating train which is strung along the carrier and connected to the several charges. Weighting means of any suitable form may be attached to the, car- Iier to assist in lowering the devicethrough a well bore. The reinforcement of the edges of the, strip carrier prof vides additional tensile strength without substantially reducing the flexibility of the Strip, and forms exible members which will bend or spread under transverse forces produced by detonation of the charges without shearing, so that the entire strip carrier remains suiiciently intact to be withdrawn from the well after the charges are fired. In order to further reduce they resistance to the shearing forces produced by the charges and to cause the strip to preferentially split or part. longitudinally intermediate the side edges, the metal strip may be additionally weakened longitudinally along its center portion in any suitable manner, as by removal of some of the metal intermediate the charge-supporting openings.

Other and more specic objects of this invention will become apparent from thefollowing detailed description when read in conjunction with the accompanying draw.- ings which illustrate a useful embodiment of this invention. and several modifications thereof.`

In the drawings:

Fig. l isa front elevationall View of oneform of the carrier structure in accordance with this invention showing theV structure fully assembled with the perforating charges preparatory to insertion in a well bore;

Fig. 2 isa longitudinal sectionalV view generally'along line Z-Zof Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a cross-sectional view along line 3--3 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is an elevational View of a strip carrierblank;

Fig. 5 is an endk Viewl looking upwardly toward" the lower endV oftheY carrier'bl'ank'along line 5--5' of Fig: 4;

arene?? Fig. y6 isf a fragmentary View showing an arrangement v f vrmay'be'compressed by encircling thelatter withf a metal L f l l tor; cnnnectingtogethei-:two Camel-.Sections f lockingfband, aslshowng-which'may be oany suit- I 1' l z, 'f ',Fg. y7r visapian` view yof a metalvclipshown positioned f rable :or conventional form: adapted .to -rmly fasten: neck -f f to; hold a-perforatng unit in place -on the' carrier; l f y23 to 'the firing' head, :to thereby attach the carrierto the f i l l Fig. -S, is afront elevation of fthe `metal clip looking f 5 f head' and the lowering line.; A pair :ofscrews l l l along line i3d-8.0iligtf'; 1 l f l l f f f .f .f f f 2:39f-3'extendthrough-a pair lof holes? 31u-#31 ira-'opposite -f f Fig. 9 fis;r an elevationaly view of =the clip; blank; 'f i v v f i f sidesiofineck'zsand screw intothe insertedportion of itliie 1 l Fig.y 101s -afview of the assembled carl-ier positioned f -f firing head to prevent relative rotation-between the carrier l f f 1 in: a well casingand yshowing ythe= carrier twisted 'about f f and h firing: head# -Fiiiug :head 29 iis' Connected 'to' the :its longitudinal axis yto alter the angular orientation` ot. 10 usual zlowering. cable lBld (Fig. 10'): by whichvthe carrier f f ille Porfofoiillg: Charge? i f v f f l may ybe lowered into and'fwithdrawn `from ya'welli bore 1 f v Eig. ll- 'is'y a yfragrnentary view of. they carrier which and: the` firing head may be provided with radially .arf f is rillustrative of. the condition of rthe'ca'rrier after tiring' f f .rangedupwardlyand outwardlyfextending wire? ngers 23 i i ofthe perforating units; t i 1 which may be :employedLin thefconventional. manner for'. Figs.v l2, y13 :and 14. are cross-sectional views ofy various` l5' positioning. the: carrier. inthe wellf bore. f modieti ,Shapes in Whichfthecarrier may be constructed;:y f f l The =carrier isl adaptedrto support kexplosive :perforatl Fig.. l5 isafragmeutary view, partly lin section, shot/vay ing units, designated generally byy they numeralsg. which f ingy an alternative :arrangementy forl tiring the perior-atingvr are generally: tubular inform and preferably of generally f .Charges mounted'on the carrier; and` f .i 1, f f i frusto-conical= external: shape.y Perforating units :of `,this r f f Fig.y 16 illustrates another means' by :which l they per-i .f type' 'are 7described;y iny detail kilu the S.y application of y foratingunits may be =fastened iin place ori-fthe 'fcarrieri. f William G.: -Sweetmamr Seriali No.r y163,146,y tiled vMay f Referring erst ming. 4; the carrier in aecerdancewitn l 20,v 1950.l but the Specicldetailsofsuchreroraringunits y .one embodiment gf; this inyentign y@Ornpyises ia. narrow' v r v ,do L noty form; apart of this invention, and only; the cx-v yelongated strip 2d constructed of a relatively-pliable sheet. l ternaglshape 'of outer casings '36 is 'illustrated herein for f ,metaL such as ordinarysheetbrassy copper,v zinc, alu*= 2:5; the purposey of; showing the manner in which such `unitsminurm ,or steel, of any` suitable orl standard thickness, f may bei mounted lor supported on zthe carrier-= of: this' zSuch as ,oneasixteeuth inch (0.36625),y i The widthi el? the i invention.. l Itfshould he understood, however; thatsuch; 1 rstrip will: be made;sornewhatless zthanf they diameter ofcafsings. contain: hollowed expiosive :chargeswhich are de-k ithe well bore intowhichr it is toi be inserted." By:y Wella Sinflhdfupoli deioioiiou iofdiohai'go' aihig'hvolooiiy u'al' vhere?,itwill be understoodfthat reference is .hadto either i i row gaseous lietgeneraliy alone the f1'waitin-iina'1v HXS of:r f ;theguguai-pipegei-:Casing,employed i: line 'a weit bore: or l i the charge unitwhich perfonnsthedesired perforation. ofi f fitheuncased bore itsel.- The lengthofstrip mayibey f the wall '015thewellizvore.':zw-:1fz ==l- .'f. .f: v zany suitable; or desired length, -a 'f convenient length for -As shown particularly in .Figa yl: and; 2,: one oi the .f .f f rmost purposes Abeing about l2 feet@ Thev side margins: l units 35 :is yinserted yinto reach of :the: openings .22 and;y f i `ofthe: strip 'are suitably reinforced by continuous pieces 35 posiionell corXilly: heloius rtho vtalier :ofv ihr/ exteriori f of strong :steelwire .'21, suchias piano wiraiwhichare fas, off the casing: 36 kserving to .lxnit; the' extent to which .f 2

f tenedy to'fthefstriprby rolling :or crimping'theedges: of thel the u-njtexterids:y throughithe yopening in accordance with f strip about 'the lengths of wire..y The reinforcement-thus: the diameterzofthe openingiZZ.. vtrdinarly; 'the casings'; i .provided for the feriges:y .of the metal strip. serves: to: im: 36 are provided withseriesof external annular shoulders= crease the' tensile estrength= of' fthe :carrier =and to :resist` 4D 3.7-2-37 increasingr in diametertoward the larger end: ofl f transverse shearingfor parting stresses'which maybe dethe casing. These shouldersl mayalso' serve as'abut'- veloped in the strip. Wire of about 0.072 to 0.125 inch meIlS t0 engage the margin of opening 22. The smaller in diameter, employed with aluminum strip about onethe diameters of holes 22, the greater will be the dissixteenth inch thick provides a construction which is tance which the discharge end of the perforating unit will found to be adequate in most cases. project from the side of the carrier. As the perforating A plurality of relatively large diameter circular holes UIliiS are normally made io Standardiled dimollSioXlS, the 22, are drilled or punched in strip 20 generally along its diameter` of openings 22 may he Selected in lolailon center line and preferably on uniform center spacing, the thereto to Provide the desired degree of lateral proloospacing between holes 22 being such as to provide the tion of the units relative to the face of the carrier. desired number of openings per foot 0f strip, for ex- 50 Perforating units of the type illustrated will ordinarily ample, four holes per foot on three-inch centers. be provided with an external annular shoulder 38 adja- Smaller holes 24 may be drilled or punched 'in the center Cent its discharge end. This may be employed for fastenportions of strip 20 intermediate adjacent pairs of the ing the unit in place on the carrier by means of metal larger holes 22 to thereby remove additional metal from ClipS 0f the form shown particularly in Figs. 7, 8 and 9. the strip along its center, one purpose being to addi- These clips comprise a circular band 39 adapted to slip tionally weaken the strip generally along its center line Over the discharge end 0f the perforating unit and Seat for purposes to be described hereinafter. These smaller against shoulder 38. A pair of at metal wings 40 exholes 24 also provide means for threading or winding tend from opposite sides of band 39 and are adapted to explosive detonating cord therethrough in forming dethe hout rea-1W21l'dly to extend along tho SidoS of the onating connections to the several perforating units, as Perfolaiirlg ullii and Pioleot ihlough Slots 25-25 io will be described hereinafter. Narrow slots 25-25, the opposite face of Strip 20- `The Projecting @uds of punched in the strip, are provided on opposite sides of wings 40 are then twisted, as at 41, in any Suitable each of the openings 22 for receiving the ends of the i manner to lock them to the slots, the degree of twist means employed for fastening the explosive charges in boing Such aS to dlaW the uuit rearwardly iu opening 22 place in the strip, as will be subsequently described. lo thel'ehy hold it lightly iu Place ill the Slot either hy Substantiauy blank portions 26 and 27 are left at wedging action 0f the tapered Surface of casing 36 in the upper and lower ends, respectively, of the strip. opening 22 or by compression of shoulder 37 against Referring now to Figs. l and 2, it will be seen that the the adjacent margin of the openingupper blank portion 26 may be rolled or otherwise suit- Alternate oueS of tho Poffofatiug units 35 may he iflably bent symmetrically about its longitudinal center line Sorted from opposite difeotions through openings 22, to form a generally tubular neck 2S for reception of the aS illustrated Particularly iu Figs- 1 and 2, the IoSuliug lower end of a generally conventional firing head, desig- Peffoatious heilig apart irl the Wall of tho Woll nated generally by the numeral 29. The latter is adapted hofo- It Will he understood that all of the Performing to be inserted in neck 28 and is provided with an annular units may be faced in the Same direction, if desired, O1'

groove 32 into which the adjacent portion of neck 28 75 in any other desired arrangement. Fig. 10 illustrates avisas?? another manner in which the perforating units may be oriented, at diierent angles, about the longitudinal axis of `the carrier. This is done by merely twisting the carrier in any suitable manner about its longitudinal axis. By virtue of the ilexible construction of the carrier this may be very easily accomplished and will ordinarily be done by first mounting the units in the manner illustrated in Fig. l and then applying the desired degree of twist to the carrier.

The detonating train for the units comprises a continuous length of flexible detonating cord 42, such as the wellknown Prima Cord, which extends along the length of the carrier and is trained successively over the rear ends of the several perforating units in the manner as illustrated, for example, in Figs. l and 2, the cord passing alternately to opposite sides of the carrier through openings 24. The rear ends of the casings 36 may be provided with notches 43 to receive and retain the detonating cord in proper detonating position over the ends of the units. In the arrangement illustrated particularly in Figs. l and 2, the detonating cord is tired from its lower end by means of a conventional electrically tired blasting cap 44 which is positioned adjacent the lower end of the detonating cord, to form a connection, designated generally by the numeral 45. Electric current for tiring the blasting cap is supplied thereto by means of a conventional electrical lead 46 which is strung along the face of the carrier and connects to an electrode 47 which extends through the center of firing head 29, electrode 47 forming part of a conventional electrical conductor (not shown) which is threaded in the usual manner through lowering cable 34- and extends therewith to the surface where conventional electrical initiating equipment (not shown) is located. Connection 45 formed between blasting cap 44 and the adjacent end of detonating cord 42 is enclosed within a suitable waterproof insulating jacket 48 which may form a part of the connection, and this connection may be suitably clamped to one side of portion 27 of the carrier, as by means of a U-bolt 49 which extends through openings Sil-50 provided in portion 27. The connection between the upper end of lead 46 and electrode 47 is also wrapped and enclosed in a suitable water-proof insulating covering 51 which may be shaped to be enclosed within the lower lend of neck 28 of the carrier, in a manner as illustrated p in Figs. l and 2. The upper free end of detonating cord 42 is also enclosed in a water-proof wrapping 52 to protect it against intrusion of iluids which may be present in the well bore. It will be understood that detonating cord 42 will also be encased within a suitable water-v proof, insulating covering such as rubber, or the like.

Fig. l5 illustrates a modified tiring arrangement by which detonating cord 42 may be red from its upper end, rather than from its lower end. Either tiring arrangement may be employed successsfully with the carrier construction herein described for tiring the complete train of perforating units.

While either the top or bottom tiring arrangement may be used successfully, it will generally be found to be preferable to use the arrangement for tiring the units upwardly from the bottom of the string. This tiring arrangement has the additional advantages that by ring the charges from the bottom, if the carrier should, through some untoward circumstance, part at the location of any particular charge, only the portion below this point, and from which the charges had been tired, would drop into the well bore, while the portion above the point of separation, containing the remaining charges, whether tired or unred, would be recoverable., The bottom ring arrangement, therefore, affords an additional important measure of safety and assurance with respect to protection of the well and the perforating device. This tiring arrangement may be applied with similar advantage to other and more conventional types 6 y of perforating devices in which a series of charges are mounted for sequential tiring.

Since the weight of the carrier including the perforating units mounted therein is relatively small, it may be found desirable in many cases to add weight to the carrier in order to assure rapid and uninterrupted descent of the carrier through the well bore, particularly where charges in succession.

there is fluid present in the well bore, as is most often the case. Such additional weight may be applied in vari ous ways. One convenient arrangement is illustrated and consists of a pair of lead bars 53-53 of generally semicylindrical form, which may be mounted on opposite sides of portion 27 of the carrier and connected together by means or" bolts 54 which pass transversely through the bars and portion 27. One of thebars may be hollowed out to accommodate connection 45 and serves also 'to protect this connection from striking projections which might be present along the well bore.

ln operation, the carrier having the perforating units mounted therein and connected to ring head and lowering line in the manner illustrated, for example, in Figs. l and 2, is lowered to the desired point in the well. Firing current will be supplied from the surface to blasting cap 44 which will explode and set off detonating cord It?. which will, in turn, detonate each of the The intervals between the ring of the successive perforating units will, of course, be extremely small so that for all practical purposes, their detonations occur substantially simultaneously. Explosion of perforating charges will completely disintegrate the perforating units. it is a characteristic of well designed hollow perforating charges, that a portion of the forces of the explosion will discharge from the hollowed end in the form of narrow gaseous jets along the longitudinal axis of the charge. However, substantial radial forces will also be developed and these will, of course, act upon the edges of openings 22 surrounding the perforating units. By making the carrier of relatively thin sheet metal, as described above, these forces tend to tear strip v2li apart, preferentially along its longitudinal center where the strip has been weakened by the removal 0f the metal to form openings 22 and additionally by the removal of intermediate portions of the metal in forming holes 24. This results in what I have termed a can-opener eect, in that the carrier strip is split longitudinally, the reinforced edges and the relatively Wider adjacent metal sections acting to effectively resist transverse shearing stresses so that the edge portions remain substantially intact and unbroken, although subjected to some degree of bending. Fig. ll illustrates the general appearance of a portion of the carrier after explosion of the charges. Upper and lower portions 25 and 27 which have not been substantially weakened also remain intact and remain connected to firing head Z? through the unbroken edge portions of the carrier, with the result that, after the charges have been red, the entire carrier, together with the wires 21 will be withdrawn from the well bore, along with the firing head and cable. Thus a very minimum of junk will be Ylett in the well bore.

lt will be noted from Fig. ll that the edges of holes 22 present a battered appearance, while the edges of holes 24, although torn apart, remain relatively smooth. The battered appearance of the holes in which the charges were originally mounted provides a very valuable indication that the perforating unit has, in fact, been detonated. When a string of perforating charges is lowered in a well and tired, it is, of course, highly important that all of the charges should re. With more conventional types of carriers heretofore employed, particularly expendible carriers, there was no practical way of determining whether or not all of the charges had fired, since the carriers remained in the well bore. yWith carriers constructed in accordance with the present invention, the carrier is not only recoverable, but is substantially intact except for the longitudinal split therein. Thus, merely by visual inspection of the carrier, after it is withdrawn from the well, a quick determination of the ring efficiency can be made.

Carriers in accordance with this invention have the additional advantage that, by virtue of their narrow, at construction, they occupy a minimun-1 amount of space in a well bore and thereby permit utilization of charges of maximum dimensions within the limits of the well bore diameter. Their longitudinal and lateral ilexibility permits them to be lowered in crooked well bores and through partially collapsed casing or tight places.

As noted, these carriers may be made in any desired length or made up of sections connected end `to end to obtain a length suflicient to support any desired number of perforating units. Fig. 6 illustrates one simple type of connection between carrier sections in which the ends of two sections are simply over-lapped slightly and bolted together.

Fig. 16 illustrates another arrangement for fastening the perforating units in place on the carrier without using the previously described metal clips. In this modification, a unit is inserted in its supporting opening 22 and several turns of ordinary electrical tape S may be wrapped cir.

cularly about the carrier and the ends of the unit in the manner illustrated to tie the two irmly together and retain the perforating unit in the desired position. It will be understood that various other conventional fastening arrangements may also be employed for this purpose.

Figs. 12, 13 and 14 illustrate in cross-section other suitable shapes for carriers constructed in accordance with this invention. In Fig. l2, the edges of strip 20 are merely turned inwardly and crimped to form reinforcing beads 56. In Fig. 13, the edges are shown double-crimped, as at 57. In Fig. 14, the edges are turned oppositely at right angles to strip 20 to form oppositely extending edge anges 58. It will be obvious that numerous' other arrangements may be successfully employed for eiectively reinforcing the side edges of strip 2 Generally speaking, the thickness of sheet 20 should oe the minimum commensurate with the strength required to provide firm support for the perforating units. It Should also be suciently rigid so as not to buckle or pile up when being lowered into the well bore While, at the same time, it should be suliiciently flexible to follow a crooked or inclined or irregular bore. As noted, about one-sixteenth inch aluminum sheet is adequate for most purposes, although sheets somewhat thicker or thinner may be successfully employed. Such sheets will have sufficient tensile strength to support whatever loads may be required in the ordinarycase and, of course, reinforcement of the edges provides such additional tensile strength, as may be required. Various other metals, such as copper, brass, zinc, soft iron, mild steel, and the like, having the desired physical characteristics and form, may be employed in the construction of the carriers in accordance with this invention. Also, various non-metallic sheet materials, such as semi-hard rubber or plastic compositions, and even suitably stifiened canvas or other fabrics may be employed for construction of carriers in accordance with this invention.

By reason of the relatively simple construction of the carriers herein described, it will be obvious that they may be constructed so that they may be discarded after use with small economic cost. The tiring head and weighting members which are also recoverable can be re-used repeatedly.

It will be understood that various changes and alterations may be made in the details of this invention within t the scope of the appended claims but without departing from the spirit of this invention.

What I` claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is: l. A well perforating device, comprising, an elongated continuous strip of relatively thin sheet metal shaped to be longitudinally inserted in a well bore, a plurality of longitudinally spaced openings in the medial portion of said strip intermediate the opposite side edges thereof whereby to provide longitudinally continuous marginal sections extending laterally from said openings to the side edges of said strip, an explosive perforating unit of the hollow charge type xedly mounted in each of said openings transversely to the plane of said strip, means for connecting the upper end of said strip to a lowering means, and a detonating train extending longitudinally ci said strip in detonating contact with each of said perforating units. I

2. A well perforating device, comprising, an elongated continuous strip of relatively thin sheet metal shaped to be longitudinally inserted in a well bore, a plurality of longitudinally spaced openings inthe medial portion of said strip intermediate the side edges thereof whereby to provide longitudinally continuous marginal sections extending laterally from said openings to the side edges of said strip, continuous reinforcing elements `extending longitudinally along said marginal sections, au explosive perforating unit of the hollow charge type xedly mounted in each of said openings transversely to the plane of said strip, means for connecting the upper end of said strip to a lowering means, and a detonating train extending longitudinally of said strip in detonating contact with each of said perforating units.

i 3. A well perforating device, comprising, an elongated continuous strip of relatively thin material shaped to be longitudinally inserted in a well bore, a plurality of longitudinally spaced openings in the medial portion of said strip intermediate the opposite side edges thereof whereby to provide longitudinally continuous marginal sections extending laterally from said openings to the opposite side edges of said strip, an explosive perforating unit of thehollow charge `type `ixedly mounted in each of said openings transversely to the plane of said strip, means for connecting the upper `end of said strip to a lowering means, and a detonating train extending longitudinally of said strip in detonating contact with each of said perforating units.

4. A Well perforating device, comprising, an elongated continuous strip of relatively thin sheet material shaped to be longitudinally inserted in a well bore, a plurality of longitudinally spaced openings in `the medial portion of said strip intermediate the side edges thereof whereby to provide longitudinally continuous marginal sections extending laterally from said openings to the opposite side edges of said strip, an explosive perforating unit of the hollow ycharge type xedly mounted in each of said openings transversely to the plane of said strip, means for connecting the upper end of said strip to a lowering means, a detonating element extending longitudinally of said strip in detonating Contact with each of said perforating units and initiating means connected to the lower end portion of the detonatingelement whereby to fire said units sequentially upwardly from the lowermost one of said units.

5. A well perforating device, comprising, an elongated continuous strip of relatively thin llat sheet material shaped for insertion longitudinally in a well bore, a plurality of longitudinally spaced openings through the medial portion of said strip and spaced from the opposite side edges thereof whereby to provide longitudinally continuous marginal sections of said strip extending laterally from said openings to the side edges of said strip, reinforcing elements disposed longitudinally along the side edges of both marginal sections, said marginal sections thereby having such structural strength that their resistance to lateral shear is greater than the resistance of said medial portion to longitudinal splitting, whereby the strip may be preferentially split longitudinally by the explosion of explosive units mounted in said openings, explosive perforating units of the hollow charge type mounted in one or more of said openings in fixed position transversely to the plane of said strip, and a detonating train extending longitudinally of said strip in detonating contact with each of said perforating units.

6. A well perforating device according to claim wherein said material is sheet metal approximately one-sixteenth inch thick, each of said reinforcing elements comprising a side marginal portion of said strip which has been bent inwardly upon itself.

7. A Well perforating device according tokclaim 5 wherein said strip carrying said units is twisted about its longitudinal axis to angularly orient said charges rela tive to each other about said axis.

8. A well perforating device, comprising, an elongated continuous strip of relatively thin sheet metal adapted to be longitudinally inserted in a well bore, a plurality of longitudinally spaced openings in the medial portion of said strip intermediate the side edges thereof whereby to provide longitudinally continuous marginal sections extending laterally from said openings to said side edges, continuous reinforcing elements extending longitudinally along said marginal sections, explosive perforating units of the hollow charge type fxedly mounted in at least some of said openings transversely to the plane of said strip, means for connecting the upper end of said strip to a lowering means, and a detonating train extending longitudinally of said strip in detonating contact with each of said perforating units.

9. A well perforating device, comprising, an elongated continuous strip of relatively thin sheet metal shaped to be longitudinally inserted in a well bore, a plurality of longitudinally spaced openings in the medial portion of said strip intermediate the opposite side edges thereof to provide longitudinally continuous marginal sections extending laterally from said openings to said side edges, continuous reinforcing elements extending longitudinally along said marginal sections, an explosive perforating unit of the hollow charge type fixedly mounted in each of said openings transversely to the plane of the strip, strengthrelief means other than said openings in said medial portion of the strip intermediate said units, means for connecting the upper end of.said strip to a lowering means,

and a detonating train extending longitudinally of said strip in detonating contact with each of said perforating units.

10. A well perforating device according to claim 9 wherein each of said reinforcing elements comprises said side marginal section bent inwardly upon itself.

11. A well perforating device according to claim 9 wherein said strength-relief means comprise non-chargesupporting openings.

12. A well perforating device according to claim 11 wherein said reinforcing elements comprise metal reinforcing wires secured to the marginal sections of said strip.

13. A well perforating device, comprising, an elongated strip of relatively thin sheet metal adapted to be longitudinally inserted in a well bore, continuous reinforcing elements disposed longitudinally along the side margins of the strip, a plurality of longitudinally spaced explosive perforating units of the hollow charge type ixedly mounted in the medial portion of said strip and extending transversely through the strip, said strip being twisted about its longitudinal axis to angularly orient said charges relative to each other about said axis, and a detonating train on the strip in detonating contact with the several explosive units.

References Cited inthe le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 224,024 Mason Feb. 3, 1880 386,535 Graham July 24, 1888 709,301 Capps Sept. 16, 1902 928,344 Swahn July 20, 1909 1,346,283 Vierling et al. July 13, 1920 1,443,207 Blount Jan. 23, 1923 1,794,411 Lalumiere Mar. 3, 1931 1,962,608 McEachern June 12, 1934 2,026,061 Prikel Dec. 31, 1935 2,409,848 Greulich Oct. 22, 1946 2,412,011 Sanderson` Dec. 3, 1946 2,494,256 Muskat et al I an. l0, 1950 2,543,814 Thompson et al Mar. 6, 1951

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Classifications
U.S. Classification102/310, 89/1.15, 102/319
International ClassificationE21B43/117, E21B43/11
Cooperative ClassificationE21B43/117
European ClassificationE21B43/117