Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2756863 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 31, 1956
Filing dateOct 10, 1951
Priority dateOct 10, 1951
Publication numberUS 2756863 A, US 2756863A, US-A-2756863, US2756863 A, US2756863A
InventorsLaxo Ed
Original AssigneeLaxo Ed
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Compound liner
US 2756863 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

2 Sheets-Sheet l E. LAXO COMPOUND LINER l/V/E/VTO/Z.

[p LAXO July 31, 1956 Filed Oct. 10, 1951 E. LAXO COMPOUND LINER July 31, 1956 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Oct. 10. 1951 //v VE TO/Q ED MXO ATTGRNE) United States Patent COMPOUND LINER Ed Laxo, Oakland, Calif.

Application October 10, 1951, Serial No. 250,766

4 Claims. (Cl. 198-33) This invention relates to a compound liner for lining can ends with a sealing compound.

In the manufacture of cans, the curled edges of can ends are filled with a sealing compound to provide a compound liner or gasket. This liner or gasket is intended to form a seal when the end is clamped to a can body by a seaming operation.

In machines intended to apply compound liners or gaskets to can ends, which are known as compound liners, a plurality of pairs of chucks are provided which are mounted for rotation about a central, vertical axis. Each pair of chucks comprises an upper chuck which is positively driven and a lower chuck which carries the can ends and is driven by frictional engagement of the superimposed can end with the upper chuck. A nozzle is employed to apply sealing compound to the curl of the can ends as they rotate with the chucks.

Machines of this character have been subject to certain disadvantages. The lining operation is e'ssentiallyquite simple but it must be carried out at high speed in view of competitive conditions in the can industry. Slippage between the positively driven upper chucks and the frictionally driven lower chucks occurs at the high speeds employed in commercial practice. This slippage causes scratching of the can ends, particularly those which are lacquered.

Also, in prior compound liners some of the sealing compound spills over onto the running mechanism of the lower chucks, congeals thereon and causes drag and slippage. This slippage not only results in scratching of the can ends but, also, in uneven application of the sealing compound.

It is an object of the present invention to provide an improved compound liner.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a compound liner having certain features which eliminate or lessen certain difliculties encountered with compound liners heretofore.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide a compound liner including chucks for rotating the can ends during application of the sealing compound, in which the chucks are designed and operated in a manner to reduce or eliminate slippage.

Still another object is to provide shielding means for shielding moving parts of the machine from sealing compound that may leak or spill.

These and other objects of the invention will be apparent from the ensuing description and the appended claims.

One form of the invention is illustrated by way of example in the accompanying drawings and is described in detail hereinafter.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a view, partly in side elevation and partly in section, of the compound liner of the present invention.

Figure 2 is a view taken along the line 11-11 of Figure 1, showing the lower chucks and chuck adapter in top plan.

Figure 3 is a section taken along the line III III of ice Figure 1, showing in detail the drive and lifter cam mechanism for the lower chucks.

Referring now to the drawings and more particularly to Figure 1, the machine of the present invention is generally designated by the numeral 10 and it comprises an upright column 11 to which is clamped a bottom support 12, as by means of set screws, one of which is shown at 13. The column 11 rotatably supports a lower or lifter chuck assembly 14 and an upper chuck assembly 15. The upper assembly 15 comprises a spider 16 which is rotatable on the column 11 and which includes arms 16a each of which is formed at its outer end with a sleeve 17 to receive bushings 18 and a shaft 19. A chuck 20 is threaded to the lower end of each shaft 19, the said chuck having a circular shape and a diameter somewhat less than that of the can ends, two of which are shown at 25. As illustrated, each chuck is formed with a downwardly projecting rim 26 and with a central plug 27.

Each shaft 19 is yieldably urged downwardly by an expansion spring 28 which is housed in and compressed by a cap 29 bolted to the spider 15 by a cap screw 30. The spring 28 bears against a ball bearing assembly 31 which, together with a screw 32 and a washer 33, retain the shaft 19 in the sleeve 17 and allow free rotation of the shaft.

The lower chuck assembly 14 comprises a spider 40 formed with a central sleeve 41 which is rotatable on bushings 42 fixed to the column 11. At its uppermost end the spider 40 is formed with a circular adapter plate and shield 43 which, as is most clearly shown in Figure 2, is formed with circular openings 44 to receive the individual lifter chucks 45. The particular machine of Figures 1, 2 and 3 is provided with four sets of chucks, hence with four openings 44, but it will be apparent that a greater or lesser number of chucks and a corresponding number of openings may be provided.

The spider arms are in the form of upper and lower shirts or shields 46 and 47, respectively, which serve as combined supporting elements and shields, in the manner and for the purpose explained hereinafter.

Formed integrally with and supported by the shields 46 and '47 are four sleeves 48 each of which contains bushings 49, which rotatably carry a lifter shaft 50. At its upper end each shaft 50 is threaded to a chuck 45 which is formed with an annular groove 56 to receive a corresponding groove in a can end and to seat the can end snugly. As illustrated, the curl 57 of the can end extends beyond the edge of the chuck. Near its lower end, and beneath the shields 46 and 47, a pinion 58 is keyed to the shaft 50 and at its lowermost end the shaft 50 is provided with support and lifter means in the form of a lifter cam 60 which is bolted to a support ring 59 which in turn is bolted to the bottom support 12. The lifter cam 60 is formed with an annular cam track 61 having a low dwell 65, a rise 66, a corresponding recede (not shown) and a high dwell 67. Each lifter shaft 50 is provided with a cam roller 68 which rides in the cam track 61 and is rotatably mounted on a shoe 69 which is best shown in Figure 3. Each shoe 69 is retained on its lifter shaft 50 by means of a washer 70 and a cap screw 71 (see Figure 1).

A gear 72 is provided for driving both the lower chuck assembly 14 and the upper chuck assembly 15 (which is fixed to the lower chuck assembly). The gear 72 is fixed to the spider 40 by means of cap screws 73. A driving gear 74 (see Figure 3) serves to drive the gear 72. Rotation of the gear 72 will, of course, rotate the entire bottom assembly 14 and the top assembly 15 about the axis of the column 11. At the same time the lifter shafts 50 and chucks 45 are positively driven about their individual axes by means of a ring gear 75 which is fixed to the lifter cam 65, as by means of screws 76, and the pinions 58 which are fixed to the shafts 50. The pinions 58 mesh with the stationary ring gear 75, and it will be apparent that as the spider 40 and the lifter chucks 45 rotate about the axis of column 11, the pinions 58 will roll on the ring gear 75 and will, therefore, rotate the shafts 50 and chucks 45 about their individual axes.

The machine thus described operates as follows: Can ends such as shown at 25 are fed to the machine by any suitable means. Such end feed machine will, of course, be driven in timed relation to the drying machine of the present invention. Each can end is deposited on one of the lifter chucks 45 with its curl extending over the edge of the chuck. Meanwhile, a sealing compound will be sprayed by means of a nozzle such as shown at 80 onto the curl of each can end as it passes by the nozzle. The machine will be driven by means of the gears 72 and 74. It will be seen that, at the receiving station A, the lifter chucks 45 and the upper chucks 20 are spaced apart sufliciently to receive the can ends as they are fed to the machine. Continued rotation of the bottom chuck assembly 14 in counterclockwise direction as viewed in Figure 2, will cause each cam roller 68, in turn, to ride up the rise 66 from the low dwell 65 to the high dwell 67, thereby lifting each chuck, in turn. The rise 66 is sufiicient to clamp the can end firmly against the upper chuck 2i) and to exert a compressive force on the spring 28. Continued rotation will bring each pair of chucks and each can end into registry with the nozzle 8%, which will spray sealing compound onto the curl and form a compound liner. The gears 58 and 75 will, meanwhile, rotate the lifter chucks 45 about the axes of lifter shafts 50. Consequently, the sealing compound will be applied to the entire circumference of the curl 57. It will be apparent, of course, that as many nozzles 80 may be used as desired or as may be necessary.

After the compound liner has been applied, each can end, in its turn, will be released as the corresponding cam roller 68 rides down the decline of the cam groove. Appropriate ejector or deflector means (not shown) may be used to remove each can end from the machine.

Among the several advantages of the machine thus described and illustrated, may be mentioned the fol-lowing: The lower lifter chucks 45 are positively driven whereas, in compound liners of prior design, the upper chucks are positively driven. The provision of a positive drive for the lower chucks is advantageous, among other things, because less slippage occurs. In machines of prior design, wherein the upper chucks have been positively driven and the lower chucks are driven by frictional engagement, the lower chucks tend to drag because of their inertia and because the moving parts become fouled with compound liner. This is undesirable because it results in slippage and scratching of the can ends, particularly those which are lacquered, and because it results in uneven application of the compound liner.

This ditficulty is obviated by the machine of my inven tion by reason of the positive drive provided for the lower chucks. The upper chucks are of relatively light construction and they are not subject to fouling by the compound because they are located above the nozzle 80. Consequently the upper chucks rotate very freely and the can ends exhibit little or no tendency to slip.

A further advantage resides in the fact that, in the operation of a compound liner, a certain amount of spilling of the sealing compound inevitably occurs. It will be apparent from an inspection of Figure 1 that the lower portions of my machine, which are most likely to be fouled by the spilled sealing compound, are effectively shielded by the shields 46 and 47. Also, even to the extent that moving parts of: the lower portion of the machine, such as the lifter chucks 45 and their shafts 50, become fouled by compound liner, no drag or lag results because the lifter chucks are positively driven.

Iclaim:

1. A compound liner comprising a turret mounted for rotation about a central, vertical axis; a plurality of upper, idler chucks disposed about said axis and slidably mounted in and carried by said turret for rotation therewith aud for limited sliding movement in a vertical direction, each said upper chuck being rotatable about its own axis and being adapted to engage a can end on a lower chuck to hold such can end in position on such lower chuck and to rotate by frictional engagement with such can end and lower chuck; resilient means urging each upper chuck downwardly; a plurality of lower driving chucks also disposed about said axis and in registry with said upper chucks to provide a plurality of pairs of aligned upper and lower chucks; each said lower chuck being adapted to seat a can end and to drive its opposing upper chuck by frictional engagement therewith and being slidably carried by said turret for limited vertical movement; turret rotating means for rotating the entire turret assembly, including said upper and lower chucks, about said central axis; means for simultaneously and positively driving said lower chucks to rotate the same about their individual axes; and cam means for lifting and lowering said lower chucks to bring each such chuck into operative engagement with its opposing upper chuck and to retract it from such upper chuck during each cycle of operation.

2. A compound liner comprising a vertical, stationary shaft; a sleeve rotatably mounted on said shaft for rotation about the vertical axis of the shaft; an upper turret assembly fixed to said sleeve and comprising a plurality of upper chucks dis-posed radially about said axis, each such upper chuck being mounted for rotation about its own individual axis and for limited vertical sliding movement; an expansion spring yieldably urging each upper chuck downwardly; a shield plate fixed to said sleeve and disposed beneath said upper chucks and adjacent thereto, said shield plate being formed with a plurality of openings in registry with said upper chucks; a lower turret assembly fixed to said sleeve and comprising a plurality of lower, driving, lifter chucks in registry with said upper chucks and with the openings in said shield plate to provide a plurality of aligned pairs of upper and lower chucks, each said lower chuck being mounted for vertical, sliding movement and being also rotatable about its own individual axis; means for rotating said sleeve; a ring gear fixed to said shaft and a pinion meshing therewith and fixed to each lower chuck for positively rotating said lower chucks as the entire lower turret assembly is rotated about said axis; lifter means in the form of a cam fixed to the frame of the machine and a cam follower fixed to each lower chuck for alternately lifting and lowering such chuck during each cycle of operation; and a lower shield disposed between said shield plate and said ring gear and pinions.

3. A compound liner comprising a plurality of pairs of chucks, each such pair comprising an upper idler chuck and a lower driving chuck, each lower chuck being adapted to support a can end in horizontal position with its curl accessible, each upper chuck being adapted to bear against the upper surface of a can end supported by the corresponding lower chuck to clamp the can end to such lower chuck, meanwhile exposing the curl of the can end; said compound liner also comprising turret means rotatable about a central vertical axis and carrying said pairs of chucks with the upper chuck of each pair in registry with the lower chuck of such pair, said turret means rotatably supporting said chucks in such a manner as to render the curls of the can ends supported and clamped thereby accessible; said compound liner also comprising means for positively rotating the lower chucks about their individual axes as the turret rotates about said central axis; said compound liner also comprising means for lifting each lower chuck into and maintaining it in operative engagement with its upper chuck during a portion of each cycle of operation to clamp a can end, and for lowering each lower chuck during another portion of such cycle to release the can end and to permit the placement of another can end on the lower chuck.

4. A compound liner comprising a plurality of pairs of chucks, each such pair comprising an upper idler chuck and a lower driving chuck, each lower chuck being adapted to support a can end in horizontal position with its curl accessible, each upper chuck being adapted to bear against the upper surface of the can end supported by the corresponding lower chuck to clamp the can end to the lower chuck, meanwhile exposing the curl of the can end; said compound liner also comprising turret means rotatable about a central vertical axis and carrying said pairs of chucks with the upper chuck of each pair in registry with the lower chuck of such pair, said turret means rotatably supporting said chucks in such a manner as to render the curls of the can ends supported thereby accessible and resiliently supporting the upper chucksfor only a slight degree of upward movement against a downward resilient force to permit firm clamping' of can ends; said compound liner also comprising of such cycle to release the can end and to permit the placement of another can end on the lower chuck.

' References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 908,373 Ayars Dec. 29, 1908 1,660,535 Van Halteren Feb. 28, 1928 1,848,382 Peters Mar. 8, 1932 2,109,505 Rue 2.. Mar. 1, 1938 2,110,755 Bleakley Mar. 8, 1938 2,277,129 Miller Mar. 24, 1942 2,287,356 Newman June 23, 1942 2,351,200 George et al. June 13, 1944 2,404,233 Hurley July 16, 1946

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US908373 *Feb 8, 1906Dec 29, 1908Ayars Machine CoCan-capping machine.
US1660535 *Mar 4, 1926Feb 28, 1928Steel Wheel CorpMeans for filling spokes
US1848382 *Sep 26, 1927Mar 8, 1932American Can CoCompound lining machine
US2109505 *Jul 24, 1934Mar 1, 1938Hoffman Beverage CompanyWrapping machine
US2110755 *Feb 7, 1933Mar 8, 1938Gillord CorpMethod and apparatus for applying metal coatings
US2277129 *Sep 17, 1940Mar 24, 1942President And Directors Of TheMachine for making paper containers
US2287356 *May 19, 1939Jun 23, 1942Newman IsidorLining machine
US2351200 *Sep 18, 1941Jun 13, 1944Wingfoot CorpRubber valve handling apparatus
US2404233 *Sep 23, 1944Jul 16, 1946Jr Samuel C HurleyMechanism for rotating articles
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3098553 *Jun 16, 1960Jul 23, 1963Rca CorpTube cage orienting and positioning apparatus
US4016968 *Sep 5, 1975Apr 12, 1977The Continental Group, Inc.Method and apparatus for orienting can ends
US4066162 *Nov 28, 1975Jan 3, 1978Harris CorporationOrbital turn
Classifications
U.S. Classification198/377.2, 118/319
International ClassificationB21D51/46
Cooperative ClassificationB21D51/46
European ClassificationB21D51/46